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Old 01-24-2010, 09:05 PM   #1
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Deep well pressure tank


I have a Well X Trol pressure tank that was manufactured in 10/2001 and installed sometime after that by a pump installer. It is the 2nd tank that this well has had. This tank now needs to be replaced as I am certain that the air bladder is no good.

I will have it replaced by a local pump and filter man that has done good work for my sister and parents. How long would these tanks normally last and can they be effected by small particles in the water?

I am using a filter now after the pressure tank that should prevent these from showing up plugging aerators etc. However, there is either a real good supply of these built up in the pipes and hot water coil of the boiler from before the filter went on a couple of years ago or these are somehow being produced in the water after the filter.

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Old 01-24-2010, 10:20 PM   #2
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Longevity is sort of hard to pinpoint with well tanks; an awful lot depends on the installation. Is it in a damp, dank crawlspace, or is it in a nice dry basement with good ventilation around it?

I went with a Well-Mate fiberglass tank. It's actually designed for direct burial in the ground (if you choose to do so), so it costs a little more (mine's installed in the basement). The steel tanks always eventually rust out; the fiberglass tanks don't.

I like to place the dirt/rust filter on the inlet side of the well tank. One of the biggest causes of failure has to do with the build-up of dirt/rust/sediment in the 1/4" tube leading to the pressure switch. When that tube gets clogged, the pump won't shut off until the pressure is well beyond the 60psi cut-off.

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Old 01-26-2010, 01:16 PM   #3
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what happens when the filter plugs up and pressure can not reach the pressure switch
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Old 01-26-2010, 09:25 PM   #4
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Any filters should be between the pressure tank and the demand (in this case the house).

The bladders in tanks usually wear out long before the tank itself because of the cycling. The more times the pump starts and stops the shorter the life of the tank bladder.

When you replace the tank this time you may want to consider installing a Cycle Stop Valve www.cyclestopvalves.com. They will extend the life of the pump, pressure switch and the tank while at the same time give you constant pressure like city water pressure and they are reasonable.

www.dci-inc.us
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Old 01-26-2010, 09:36 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by rudolph58 View Post
what happens when the filter plugs up and pressure can not reach the pressure switch
That should never be a concern as long as the filter is changed/serviced when it's supposed to be.
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Old 01-26-2010, 11:27 PM   #6
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That should never be a concern as long as the filter is changed/serviced when it's supposed to be.
This is still not fool proof.

Sudden heavy demand on the water system can stir up silt and sediment in the water table around the well and clog the filter....also, as the filter loads, it will created more back pressure and load on your well pump...which could lead to premature pump failure.
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Old 01-27-2010, 01:47 AM   #7
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i have to agree with andrew on this one i am gonna say this once if you put in a filter make sure it is after the pressure switch. You very well could burn up the well pump if you dont.
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Old 01-27-2010, 06:50 AM   #8
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This is still not fool proof.

Sudden heavy demand on the water system can stir up silt and sediment in the water table around the well and clog the filter....also, as the filter loads, it will created more back pressure and load on your well pump...which could lead to premature pump failure.
It's a valid point, but it's also a scenario I've never seen play-out in 15 years of plumbing. I've seen some nasty, unbelievably clogged filters but none that have stopped the water flow completely.

The larger concern, I think, is human error: failing to maintain the filter; failure to install a bypass loop and use it properly while the filter is being serviced etc. I can see someone relying on the integral so-called "bypass" valve (which is really just a shut-off valve) on the filter housing while changing filters. If someone tries using the water in the house while the valve is off, the pump will be pumping against a dead end.

My customers are pretty well-off and tend not to do their own maintainance, so I've always felt safe doing it the way I do. But you're probably right that it's not the right advice for a DIYer.
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Old 01-27-2010, 06:13 PM   #9
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You should never put anything between a submersible pump and the pressure switch that controls it.

If you do, a submersible pump can build enough pressure to blow it off the drop pipe in the well or cause leaks requiring pulling the pump to fix them. And... the pressure tank doesn't care if the water is clear or dirty, dirty water won't hurt a pressure tank in any way.

Also, there is little sense in filtering invisible 'dirt' anyway. And if your water is visibly dirty, a backwashed filter is the best choice to clarify the water where disposable cartridge filters are the worst choice because they were never meant to be used as POE (point of entry) "whole house" filtration.
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Old 01-27-2010, 07:03 PM   #10
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Well water should never be dirty. Never.

This is how to develop a well. Note the clear cup in the man's hand?? He will not move the rig off the hole until the water is clean.

Deep well pressure tank-pict0126.jpg
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Old 01-27-2010, 10:30 PM   #11
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My filter is not between the submersible pump and the pressure switch.

Driller1 -- I believe that the water over a long period of time has changed, the deep well was put in over 20 years ago (by an old man with a "pounder" type drilling rig, not a rotary drill).
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Old 01-28-2010, 12:00 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by meboatermike View Post
My filter is not between the submersible pump and the pressure switch.

Driller1 -- I believe that the water over a long period of time has changed, the deep well was put in over 20 years ago (by an old man with a "pounder" type drilling rig, not a rotary drill).
The old 2" wells do "slime" over down in the bedrock. However, this typically leads to low water yield, not sediment. If the well is that old, start saving for a new one.
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Old 01-28-2010, 08:26 AM   #13
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around here the pound type usuallt give better water flow due to not fusing sides, tends to fracture and open more water ways
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Old 01-28-2010, 08:40 AM   #14
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around here the pound type usuallt give better water flow due to not fusing sides, tends to fracture and open more water ways
We hydrofrac to the north of the state. Always air drill up there.

In Michigan we get a real mix. Because of the glacier activity, 50 foot distance between wells can give you VERY different results. We have a 370 foot rock well 30 foot from 50 foot screened well. Always a good time!!
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Old 01-28-2010, 11:29 AM   #15
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Deep well pressure tank


The well actually has a 6" ? well casing not, certainly not 2". Hit ledge at 3 feet or less. And yes, mine is quite deep and yet the neighbor just up from me had one drilled a week after mine and only went like 50' with way more water. We originally had dug wells almost across the street from each other and were both close to running out on dry summers. Still have not regretted putting in the deep well even though I might have waited had I known he was going to stop using his dug well.

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