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Old 07-23-2007, 02:34 PM   #1
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Copper tubing for icemaker?


I'm curious. Most of the installation instructions I've seen for the water supply line to a built in ice maker call for copper tubing and explicitly prohibit plastic (teflon?) tubing. Why is this exactly? In fact, I've seen some icemaker installation kits that include teflon tubing. Strangely, I had a condo for 6 years whose icemaker was fed via teflon tubing and I never had any issues.

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Jim
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Old 07-23-2007, 08:47 PM   #2
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Copper tubing for icemaker?


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I'm curious. Most of the installation instructions I've seen for the water supply line to a built in ice maker call for copper tubing and explicitly prohibit plastic (teflon?) tubing. Why is this exactly? In fact, I've seen some icemaker installation kits that include teflon tubing. Strangely, I had a condo for 6 years whose icemaker was fed via teflon tubing and I never had any issues.

Thanks!
Jim
Plastic tubing can be damaged too easily, biten by vermon, nicked or pinched off by refrig. itself. It can swell and burst in hot weather. Plastic tubing is never a good idea for city water pressure.
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Old 09-08-2011, 12:55 PM   #3
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Copper tubing for icemaker?


I need to install water line to ice maker.I have pex tube.how do I tap into this.
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Old 09-08-2011, 01:44 PM   #4
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Copper tubing for icemaker?


I have installed these water lines in plastic as well and they have survived for years. MechanicalDVR does have some good points as well, at least related to pinching and being nicked.

Copper on the other hand can only be run to a point behind the fridge, from that point you will need a flex line, it is a good idea to put a shut-off valve right behind the fridge as well.

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Old 09-08-2011, 04:52 PM   #5
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Copper tubing for icemaker?


Copper is the best for water lines to ice makers, use a regular valve teed off a water line then reduced to 1/4 " do not use saddle valves they leak and come lose and sometimes do not shut off when you need them to.

When you bring your copper water line up behind the refrigerator make 4 or 5 loops (like a slinky toy) coiled up then hook it to the refrigerator ice maker connection and secure it with a clamp on the refrigerator that way you can roll the refrigerator out for cleaning and service with out worrying about the water line, just take it easy when rolling it out and back make sure the coil is in the right position. Try to usse "L" copper it's thicker than "M" a little more money but it's worth it.
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Old 09-08-2011, 08:52 PM   #6
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Copper tubing for icemaker?


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Copper is the best for water lines to ice makers, use a regular valve teed off a water line then reduced to 1/4 " do not use saddle valves they leak and come lose and sometimes do not shut off when you need them to.

When you bring your copper water line up behind the refrigerator make 4 or 5 loops (like a slinky toy) coiled up then hook it to the refrigerator ice maker connection and secure it with a clamp on the refrigerator that way you can roll the refrigerator out for cleaning and service with out worrying about the water line, just take it easy when rolling it out and back make sure the coil is in the right position. Try to usse "L" copper it's thicker than "M" a little more money but it's worth it.
I don't fully agree with your comment on copper....as they now make braided stainless lines just for hooking up ice makers.
As you explained, they are extra long and just wrap up behind the refrigerator and the extra length allows for roll-out.
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Old 09-09-2011, 05:54 AM   #7
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Copper tubing for icemaker?


You don't have to fully agree on anything the Op can use anything he/she wants.

PS: Installation instructions recommend copper, and another point we all know braided lines have been around for years and it's not new.

Last edited by COLDIRON; 09-09-2011 at 06:17 AM. Reason: added text
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Old 09-09-2011, 08:07 AM   #8
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Copper tubing for icemaker?


Braided is the way to go.
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Old 09-09-2011, 08:46 AM   #9
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Copper tubing for icemaker?


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Braided is the way to go.
I agree 100%. Ease of installation, flexibility, superior to copper.
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Old 09-09-2011, 08:53 AM   #10
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Copper tubing for icemaker?


I'm a braided man myself.
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Old 09-10-2011, 07:46 AM   #11
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Copper tubing for icemaker?


There must be 50 ways to install a refrigerator ice maker water line.
After all the suggestions have been considered use this to determine the final installation.

With the refrigerator there was installation manuals and operation manuals the manufacturer recommended a certain way to perform the installation as stated in the manuals. That's the approved way.

The manufacturer don't care about flexibly, or ease of installation but he does care about copper being superior to vinyl or braided lines.

They just want it installed in a trouble free reliable way that will last many years trouble free.

PS: spend anywhere between $500 and $4000 and do a cheap waterline install that can wreak havoc on your home just don't make sense.$$$$$$$
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Old 09-10-2011, 11:30 AM   #12
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Copper tubing for icemaker?


Your argument that copper lines are superior to braided stainless steel lines is flawed.
Take a look at the responses from plumbers. I would consider them experts in this field.
Compression fittings don't like movement and that is what happens each time the refrigerator is moved for cleaning. Certain types of water can raise havoc with copper over time due to thin wall design.
I am not here to argue with anyone............my personal opinion is that braided lines are superior to copper. COLDIRON feels copper is the superior product.
Two plumbers have recommended braided over copper. The OP now has a choice to make.

My new washing machine came with rubber hoses from the manufacturer and the manual mentioned how to hook them up. I threw the rubber hoses away and went with a superior product of braided hoses.
I am expecting the Appliance Police to come and get me any day now.
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Old 09-10-2011, 12:05 PM   #13
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Copper tubing for icemaker?


We use copper for our icemaker hookups. I wasn't even aware that there was such a thing as a 1/4" x 1/4" braided stainless flex supply. One thing about the stainless is that people tend to overtighten them and rip the rubber gasket that's down inside of the fitting.

Is one superior to the other? I'd guess the 1/4" copper is a little cheaper. If you have a valve under the sink and have to route the line through the cabinets, copper is probably available in a length that will allow you do do this without couplings, and the braided stainless is not.

Everything has an application at which it excels, and I don't think one or the other is better 100% of the time.

I had plastic tubing on mine until I found a mouse in the house. (caught that sucker) and replaced the tubing with copper because it had teeth marks in it.
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Old 09-10-2011, 01:10 PM   #14
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Copper tubing for icemaker?


When it comes to new installs I will use copper on ice makers and dishwashers, why? Because I have a nice long roll of it on my truck that will do multiple installs, and I know how to put a compression fitting together so they won't leak. I'll even use chrome supplies on toilets because IMO they look much better than a loopy flex line under the tank.
Yep, I'm partial to copper. That comes from my commercial construction background I guess. No flex lines were allowed. For a DIY'er- use flex lines
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Old 09-10-2011, 11:51 PM   #15
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Copper tubing for icemaker?


I use polyflow......good to about 500 PSI....it would take a hell of a rat to chew through it....
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