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-   -   Copper bond epoxy (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/copper-bond-epoxy-18110/)

rjniles 03-06-2008 06:14 PM

Copper bond epoxy
 
Was at Lowes and saw a product called "Copper Bond", a 2 part epoxy for joining copper pipe and fittings. Directions say mix the 2 parts and appy to clean pipe and fittings, 15 minutes later good for 200 PSI. Looked interesting for tight applications were you don't want to use a torch. Has any one had experience with Copper Bond? How do the code compliance people view this product?

Ron The Plumber 03-06-2008 08:46 PM

I don't view it, never used and won't, I don't trust that type of application for bonding copper pipe together.

majakdragon 03-07-2008 09:41 AM

Copper pipe and fittings are made to be soldered, not "glued". An inspector would have you tearing it out. If you want to glue fittings, use PVC. It is a shame that companies are producing stuff and claiming it will work for all applications, while it doesn't meet code and could cause more problems than it solves.

Marlin 03-07-2008 06:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by majakdragon (Post 105118)
Copper pipe and fittings are made to be soldered, not "glued". An inspector would have you tearing it out. If you want to glue fittings, use PVC. It is a shame that companies are producing stuff and claiming it will work for all applications, while it doesn't meet code and could cause more problems than it solves.

But is says used by plumbers right on it!

Ron The Plumber 03-07-2008 06:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Marlin (Post 105342)
But is says used by plumbers right on it!

I think it is approved method by UPC Code, but you won't find this plumber using it.

Marlin 03-07-2008 06:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron The Plumber (Post 105343)
I think it is approved method by UPC Code, but you won't find this plumber using it.

You're just jealous Home Depot let us in on all the plumber secrets! Copper glue, flex tail pieces, plastic trip levers, angle stop repair kits, etc.



I was joking though. I'm a junior mechanic at a plumbing and heating shop. I see cheap fixes like those listed above all the time. People end up paying more to have us fix not only the original problem but their mistakes as well. Do it right, or pay someone to do it right.

majakdragon 03-08-2008 09:21 AM

The one I really laugh at is the flexible, corrogated plastic trap that you can move around to make it fit your mistake in measuring. Codes change by State and some allow things that others don't. LOCAL Code office is the key here. One example is Studor valves. They work, but are not accepted in all areas.

Chimonger 03-19-2017 07:15 PM

Re: Copper bond epoxy
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by rjniles (Post 104933)
Was at Lowes and saw a product called "Copper Bond", a 2 part epoxy for joining copper pipe and fittings. Directions say mix the 2 parts and appy to clean pipe and fittings, 15 minutes later good for 200 PSI. Looked interesting for tight applications were you don't want to use a torch. Has any one had experience with Copper Bond? How do the code compliance people view this product?

Bot a 'lipstick on a pig' flipped repo. Been fixing big ticket items on it for the last 3 years. What a racket, is Real Estate around here! :vs_mad:
We're more experienced than the average bear at most things repair. :glasses:
DH worked on subs, using epoxy to bond plumbing...that kinda sold me.
Our water supply line valves under bathroom sink started leaking suddenly. Debacle trying to use Sharkbite, then more compression valves to fix...terrible!
Exasperated and exhausted from long hard day, called plumber, see if they had some secret magic we'd never known of. Rotorooter showed up, assessed situation:
1. They couldn't do the proper soldering of a threaded copper nipple onto the pipe today.
2. They would cut-back the pipe to get to fresh copper [making it impossible to do repairs later if needed]
3. They'd use same compression valves that had leaked badly; but assured us it's all in the technique, so trust them.
4. Don't worry, they have a great warranty on their work [[but when asked what about damage to house from their leak.....>>crickets<<...changed subject]]
5. They'd charge $375 + parts + tax to do this.
We just said no.
We don't trust the compression fittings; copper is meant to be soldered, not compressed. And, can't afford their pricetag.
Thank goodness for my very own submarine marine machinery mechanic!
But...had issues around soldering. And I wasn't keen on the "cold solder" junk.
But he found the Copper bonding epoxy at ACE hardware, bot some of that and some food-safe thread seal.
Done. In minutes. Let set. Use.
No leaks...but job is new...no idea how long it will last.
So, will keep an eye on it, and will later get some leak detector alarms for under each sink, laundry, water heater areas.
Just because something is new, doesn't mean it won't work. I understand those who know and are comfy with sweating copper. Frankly, I'd rather that.
But, plumbers around here either aren't working 24/7 emergencies as they claim to, or don't want to do copper sweating [maybe because of not getting call-backs for more intensive repairs, caused by their compression fittings??]
With our decades of encounters with some interesting plumbing adventures, etc., this epoxy seemed a decent fix we're willing to try.
I'll have to try to remember to return here to post updates on it...sometime down the road.
Home Depot [Lowe's too, I think], also carry some pipe-wrap mesh stuff, that is supposed to stop leaks...I have some of that on hand, just in case of pipe holes [old copper + 30 years of hard water = threatening pipe rot]
There are some interesting new things, that could help get things under control at least, to buy time until proper job can be done.
If this epoxy holds well, at least until we can afford to re-plumb the house, it's good. If it doesn't hold, at least we can take a breather, to locate a better plumber option, just in case.

MTN REMODEL LLC 03-19-2017 07:33 PM

Re: Copper bond epoxy
 
I was in a Habitat/Humanity store the other day that had tons of something called like "Copper Weld" in a small tube like dispenser.... don't know if it is the same as the OP brought up.

For $1 I bought a tube... went home and read it carefully... it sort of implied it was an acceptable approved product... with a string of cautions that it can't be torqued.

Gosh... I wonder who gave all this miraculous product to Habitat/Humanity to dump.??????


(For close quarters where you can't get fire to sweat, bite the bullet for a sharkbite. I do have decent confidence in sharkbite.... hope I'm not proven wrong in the future... but at least you can disassemble them)

hkstroud 03-19-2017 08:49 PM

Re: Copper bond epoxy
 
I'm having a lot of trouble imagining copper supply lines under a bath lavey that I couldn't sweat.
I don't think I would call Rotorooter to clean a drain line much less repair a supply line.
Sharkbites are easy but expensive and some times a little big and bulky. I wouldn't bury a compression fitting but I have never had one leak.

I have some of that Copper Weld. Used it to make a frame out of copper pipe once. Seemed to bond fairly well, never used it for water supply. I might try it for a drain line some day.

A little off the subject of this thread but here is a plumbing story for you cup cakes out there.

Got a call from Mrs. P about two weeks ago. She said she didn't have any water in her house. Said she didn't have any water in the kitchen or the bath.

I said "OK, Ill be right over."

Mrs. P. lives about 5 minutes away.

I go over and sure enough she doesn't have any water anywhere.

Then she tells me that she went up under the house to turn off the water to the hose bibs so they wouldn't freeze.

Not only is the end of February but she had forgotten that I changed her hose bibs to frost free.

I went up in the crawl space and turned the main valve back on.
Then lectured her about calling me and not doing things like that any more.

Mrs. P has gotten to the point she needs a walker most of the time

Mrs. P is 95.

clarenceboddick 03-19-2017 09:40 PM

Re: Copper bond epoxy
 
The practical issue is adhesion and resistance to line pressure and temperature fluctuation. Copper has a different rate of thermal expansion than epoxy. If you sanded and cleaned the pipes and fittings very well and used enough, it might work for awhile. I wouldn't use it, especially inside walls and attics. It would be an interesting experiment to try it outside on a hose bib and see how long it lasts.

I've always wondered how long Loctite green bearing and sleeve retainer would work on copper with fittings that didn't have much slop. Strong stuff for transmission rebuilding.


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