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brandisophie 11-06-2010 04:54 PM

converting laundry room to bathroom
 
Hi everyone-my house was built in the mid-60s on a concrete slab. I have one bathroom on the left side of the house, and a laundry room on the far right rear of the house. I'm thinking of enlarging the laundry room by taking additional space from an adjoining room and converting it into a bathroom/laundry room. My question is this: Since I already have water and drain for the wash machine, other than adding additional plumbing lines for sink/tub or shower, what is required for the toilet? Will my concrete slab need to be busted up? Is a sewer line for toilet different from the existing drainage for wash machine? If not, can I tap into that drainage? Thanks for your assistance.

TheEplumber 11-06-2010 05:03 PM

Minimum drain size for toilet is 3". Minimum for a clothes washer is 2" or possibly 1.5" on older homes. Based on these code requirements you will need a 3" line brought to your proposed toilet location. You will have a 3" or 4" near your existing bathroom. Tie into this line for new work.

brandisophie 11-06-2010 05:11 PM

So, would the best way to do this be to dig a trench across my back yard around to the side of the house where the other bath is, as opposed to busting up all the flooring and slab through the entire house? Don't suppose we could go through the attic?

TheEplumber 11-06-2010 05:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brandisophie (Post 529834)
So, would the best way to do this be to dig a trench across my back yard around to the side of the house where the other bath is, as opposed to busting up all the flooring and slab through the entire house? Don't suppose we could go through the attic?

Probably, you need to check your elevations to make sure you enough grade. No, if you can drain by gravity flow then that is what your inspector will want

Bonzai 11-06-2010 06:29 PM

Another possible toilet solution that does not require breaking up the floor is a Saniflo macerating toilet. If you look for this on YouTube you'll see an installation video that explains how the drainage works. It does not use a regular 3" drain and no need to open up the concrete. However the toilet with macerator retails for around $850 from what I can tell compared to leas than half that for a regular toilet. Probably going to install one for a client in their condo as no place for a regular drain.

brandisophie 11-06-2010 09:13 PM

thanks--obviously, I need to inquire with a plumber and the permitting office. I live in south Louisiana and am about 8 - 10 feet above sea level, so that might make a difference.

brandisophie 11-06-2010 09:14 PM

thanks, that sounds like an expensive toilet, but compared to the alternative, it might actually be cheaper. Will have to do some research.

oh'mike 11-07-2010 07:32 AM

Do check with the code folks--They may allow you to put in a sewage pit and ejector pump--

That would allow you to run the lines up, through the attic--

Eplumber is probably right about the code,however, sounds like you may be digging a trench-Mike-

Homerepairguy 11-07-2010 01:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bonzai (Post 529873)
Another possible toilet solution that does not require breaking up the floor is a Saniflo macerating toilet. If you look for this on YouTube you'll see an installation video that explains how the drainage works. It does not use a regular 3" drain and no need to open up the concrete. However the toilet with macerator retails for around $850 from what I can tell compared to leas than half that for a regular toilet. Probably going to install one for a client in their condo as no place for a regular drain.

First time I've heard of a macerator toilet so after reading your post, I did a web search. Found this youtube This Old House video that has a great description of that kind of toilet. Here's the link to save others from searching:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X72TvsTEH-k

Looks like a great solution to the OP's question. In his case, he could just tie the output of the macerator toilet to his existing laundry room drain without having to run any pipes in the attic.

Just be sure the kids don't flush any rags or toys down the toilet ..... :)


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