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Old 05-26-2012, 08:31 PM   #1
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Continuing sump pump pipe questions


I have already had some of my questions answered in another post, but now I need clarification on other advice I received.

I have a house built in 1935 with a little water in the basement. I found that one of the clay pipes under the cement floor that feeds into the sump pump pit was damaged. I sledge hammered a trench around the basement, and I will be putting PVC pipe with two holes on the bottom for drainage. I have been told to put down gravel first and wrap a “sock “around the PVC pipe. I have conflicting stories as to if I should put 6 mil plastic over the pipe and or use a ground cloth for weeds over the pipe before cementing over the top of it.

The 6 mil plastic idea came from an inspector from another city. The plastic would act as a vapor barrier. A contractor told me that is the wrong thing to do, and I should just put a landscaping ground cloth over the gravel and then add cement. What process would you all use? I have not yet laid the pipe.




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Old 05-26-2012, 08:35 PM   #2
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Continuing sump pump pipe questions


The inspector is correct---lay pipe and silt sock--pack with gravel---top that with a vapor barrier--then replace the concrete--

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Old 05-26-2012, 09:46 PM   #3
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Continuing sump pump pipe questions


It is even better to line the excavated surfaces with filter fabric and the put in very permeable mixture of clean rock and clean sand under, along and over the PVC. This increases area to collect the water and avoids the problem with concentrating the locally rapid flow (carrying silt through the coarse rock) and clogging the sock near the the holes, clogging the sock in a small area.

The socks are good for retailers since they take little room and are easy to sell.

A vapor barrier over the permeable soil is very cheap and worthwhile to put down before pouring a concrete "cap" over the excavation.

Dick
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Old 05-26-2012, 10:10 PM   #4
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Continuing sump pump pipe questions


When you say silt sock you are refering to the one that goes over the PVC pipe right? Some say that will clog the holes. Most seem to favor use of the sock.

Also, do I cap all this with actual concrete mix or cement mix? I have no experience with cement/concrete in large quantities.

Thank you both for helping me to continue this project.
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