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-   -   ?Combination of copper & pvc pipe with SharkBite ? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/combination-copper-pvc-pipe-sharkbite-169694/)

handyman92865 01-21-2013 07:48 AM

?Combination of copper & pvc pipe with SharkBite ?
 
Has anyone used the SharkBite push in connection with the combination of copper and the pvc pipes? How reliable is this type of connection? I want to use to install a water softener because I do not know how to solder.

joecaption 01-21-2013 08:45 AM

That will work fine.
But I would suggest you take the time to learn how to solder, it's not really hard to learn how to do it.
http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=...pipe&FORM=VDRE

paul100 01-21-2013 09:42 AM

Actually I don't think it will work. PVC pipes have a different outside diameter then copper. They will work on CPVC pipes.

handyman92865 01-21-2013 11:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by paul100 (Post 1098547)
Actually I don't think it will work. PVC pipes have a different outside diameter then copper. They will work on CPVC pipes.

Thanks for the reply. What is the different between PVC and CPVC pipes? Do they sell the CPVC pipes at Home Depot?

jagans 01-21-2013 11:42 AM

PVC = Polyvinyl Chloride
CPVC= Chlorinated Polyvinyl Chloride

joecaption 01-21-2013 12:04 PM

PVC should not be used for the supply lines, only copper, CPVC, or Pex.

jeffnc 01-21-2013 12:08 PM

The Sharkbite works fine with CPVC and copper. There is no such thing as PCV to copper for a supply line. PVC is for drains.

If you're doing the piping from scratch, go ahead and use PEX. If you have CPVC (sounds like you need to check into that a little), then it can be used.

jagans 01-21-2013 12:22 PM

Im sorry, but the main line from my well is 1 inch PVC and is labeled "For Cold Water". Apparently, it is the hot water that makes the use of CPVC mandatory for potable water.

jeffnc 01-21-2013 01:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jagans (Post 1098676)
Im sorry, but the main line from my well is 1 inch PVC and is labeled "For Cold Water". Apparently, it is the hot water that makes the use of CPVC mandatory for potable water.

Well I suppose local codes differ. Normally PVC can be used for the main line coming into the house, but not for internal supply. I assumed the line the OP was talking about was house-side plumbing. Of course PVC is used for lots of other water supply uses - pools, etc.

jagans 01-21-2013 04:04 PM

I thought some of you might find this interesting. I was right about the heat. Dont like the Dioxin thing though with regard to fire. No free lunch. In theory, you could plumb your cold side with PVC, but of course why would you? Sounds like CPVC is a better animal all around. I kind of wonder why Pex has become so popular, I guess price? Too many crimped on fittings for me. I would only use soldered copper if I could, but my water tends to be acidic. Nothing like good ole type L if you ask me.

Physical properties

CPVC shares most of the features and properties of PVC. It is also readily workable, including machining, welding, and forming. Because of its excellent corrosion resistance at elevated temperatures, CPVC is ideally suited for self-supporting constructions where temperatures up to 200 F (90 C) are present. The ability to bend, shape, and weld CPVC enables its use in a wide variety of processes and applications. It exhibits fire-retardant properties.
Comparison to polyvinyl chloride (PVC)

Heat resistance

CPVC can withstand corrosive water at temperatures greater than PVC, typically 40C to 50C (104F to 122F) or higher, contributing to its popularity as a material for water piping systems in residential as well as commercial construction.
Mechanical properties

The principal mechanical difference between CPVC and PVC is that CPVC is significantly more ductile, allowing greater flexure and crush resistance. Additionally, the mechanical strength of CPVC makes it a viable candidate to replace many types of metal pipe in conditions where metal's susceptibility to corrosion limits its use.
Fire properties

CPVC is similar to PVC in resistance to fire. It is typically very difficult to ignite and tends to self-extinguish when not in a directly applied flame.
Due to its chlorine content, the incineration of CPVC, either in a fire or in an industrial disposal process, can result in the creation of dioxins.

jeffnc 01-21-2013 04:16 PM

Plumb something like a bathroom or larger and you'll quickly see the advantages PEX has over all the others.

By the way PEX is a mash of Cross-linked PolyEthylene so it's all caps just like PVC. It's not a brand name.


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