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Old 03-07-2016, 12:24 PM   #1
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Check my DWV setup please


Okay, so being out of state for work I can't get this inspected until next week. As that gives me another weekend to correct any mistakes, I wanted to post some pics and see if anyone can point anything out that needs to be corrected.

This is from replacing the rotted out iron pipe under the basement floor on my fiancÚ's house, and while I was at it the stack was replaced and the utility sink was ran to the stack above ground (with an AAR)

I also added a stand pipe near the house center wall for the A/C condensate drain. Previously, it just was a PVC pipe laying across the floor going to the floor drain.

This is my DIY completion of the project from this thread:
Old clay sewer pipes under basement

One finaly note, when I rebuilt the stack it ended up as I needed to jog it to the side from where it was originally. As I laid the pipe starting from the cleanout near where the line exits the house, I followed code for slope and put it in at 3/8" per foot. This resulted in the bottom of the stack being lower than it was previously, and since that as right over the storm drain pipe, it was necessary for the bottom of the stack to be moved over.
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Check my DWV setup please-stack.jpg   Check my DWV setup please-near-furnace.jpg   Check my DWV setup please-20160306_182011.jpg  

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Old 03-08-2016, 12:00 AM   #2
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What is the vertical pipe between the laundry sink and washer? I doubt the san tee on it's back will be accepted

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Old 03-08-2016, 07:09 AM   #3
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The 3" vertical pipe connecting to the iron pipe at the top is the stack with the toilet, shower and bathroom sink connecting to a branch in the iron fitting above the frame. The kitchen branch with the sanitary tee on its back has 2 vertical pipes, one visible the other behind the dryer going to the 2 bowl kitchen sink. 1 pipe to each bowl, 1 being a disposal.

I did figure the kitchen as it was is a sketchy setup, but the sanitary T I did that way because I wasn't sure I could come up with a way that a wye would fit... which was an issue with the existing height of the kitchen branch.

In retrospect I think I can a wye work if I redo the kitchen branch, which probably needs to be vented as it currently is not. Okay, I see that the can of worms is opened. Relatively speaking to the overall cost and effort, making this part right is a relatively small piece of the whole project cost and effort.

If anyone has a chance to diagram what I need it would be appreciated. I can probably work through it by the weekend when it will be the next chance to work on it but the guidance would be appreciated...
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Last edited by WillK; 03-08-2016 at 07:16 AM.
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Old 03-08-2016, 08:07 AM   #4
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A vertical drain must enter a horizontal line with a combination wye and 45. Santees can't go on their backs in a drainage application.

Replace the two 45's with a 90- that will give you more room to fit the 3" wye in

Or replace the 45's with a vertical santee to receive the branch to the washer. Then of the top of the tee- use two 45's to offset over to the 3" stack.

I'm not sure how you vented the washer. Does it have a vent?
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Old 03-08-2016, 08:48 AM   #5
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Okay, I probably need to make a diagram, but on the right in the picture is the dryer. The washer would physically be located where the hole in the floor is and drains into the utility sink on the left in the picture. The washer is vented with an AAV that is connected to the 1 1/2" horizontal pipe with a sanitary T on its back. Correct me if I'm wrong about that being allowed, I wouldn't be heartbroken if I had to redo that because it was hard to get to due to the pile of dirt. But I would rather do it after I get the hole filled in.
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Old 03-08-2016, 10:50 AM   #6
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Hypothetically, could I get this inspected for the part that needs to get buried so I can do that this weekend and correct the non-buried part for final?
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Old 03-08-2016, 11:02 AM   #7
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Quote:
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Hypothetically, could I get this inspected for the part that needs to get buried so I can do that this weekend and correct the non-buried part for final?
Your inspector might want an additional trip fee, but you could do 2 inspections
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Old 03-08-2016, 12:03 PM   #8
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Well I'm assuming he's going to do 2 inspections anyway because he'd want to inspect the pipe before I bury it and put in the floor, or would it be normal to do the final at this point and trust that nothing is going to shift or break during burial and concrete? I've only ever done exposed plumbing permits before so I'm assuming it's 2 inspections like an electrical permit with rough and final... It would just really simplify my life to be able to get the concrete in this weekend if I can get the "rough" inspection covered this week by my father in law letting the inspector in to look.
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Old 03-08-2016, 12:07 PM   #9
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so how is it that a homeowner that doesnt know plumbing , be aloud to pull plumbing permits?
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Old 03-08-2016, 12:12 PM   #10
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Typically there is a ground rough, top out or rough in, then a final.
A job your size, I'd combine the first 2.
Perhaps ask for the ground rough, then quiz the inspector on your above ground proposed work
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Old 03-08-2016, 04:09 PM   #11
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Okay, got a call in to the inspector and they'll do 2 inspections that's no problem.

Here's another question under the category of while I've got the floor open...

Royal Oak had a major issue not long ago with basements flooding in many houses due to excessive rain/snow melt and the storm sewers backing up into the sanitary sewer and consequently flooding basements. This house was not one of those houses, but if I can put in a device while I'm doing some work, it could be a small positive selling point. I don't think I can put in a whole house backwater valve because you have to decouple the house's foundation/storm drain system from the sanitary system and that's simply beyond the scope of this project...

Am I wrong about not being able to put in a backwater valve? If I put one in that wasn't downstream of where the storm drain joins the sanitary, it would protect the basement but not the storm drain is my understanding of why it's required to decouple the systems

Could I put a backflow preventer on the floor drain? Or does that still have the same problem?
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Old 03-08-2016, 05:35 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhatRnsdownhill View Post
so how is it that a homeowner that doesnt know plumbing , be aloud to pull plumbing permits?

A home owner has the ability to pull any permit. That does not mean he will pass an inspection. The home owner must still follow the same plumbing code and have the same test as any hired plumber would have to do.

I just spent 2 hours telling a home owner how to cut all his shiny new plumbing out today because of vent issues, fitting use issues etc etc.

Then I get the great privilege of listing with code sections over 40 separate violations. Most of it would have been prevented with a consultation.

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Old 03-08-2016, 05:42 PM   #13
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Quote:
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Okay, got a call in to the inspector and they'll do 2 inspections that's no problem.

Here's another question under the category of while I've got the floor open...

Royal Oak had a major issue not long ago with basements flooding in many houses due to excessive rain/snow melt and the storm sewers backing up into the sanitary sewer and consequently flooding basements. This house was not one of those houses, but if I can put in a device while I'm doing some work, it could be a small positive selling point. I don't think I can put in a whole house backwater valve because you have to decouple the house's foundation/storm drain system from the sanitary system and that's simply beyond the scope of this project...

Am I wrong about not being able to put in a backwater valve? If I put one in that wasn't downstream of where the storm drain joins the sanitary, it would protect the basement but not the storm drain is my understanding of why it's required to decouple the systems

Could I put a backflow preventer on the floor drain? Or does that still have the same problem?

Yes you can install a backwater valve on the floor drain if only the floor drain is on that run and nothing from the first or second floors.

By the way I would strongly suggest you call for a consultation first. You have testing issues you need to plan on and venting issues. If you call for an inspection you may get turned down and then you get the privalege of paying a fine.
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Old 03-08-2016, 06:40 PM   #14
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Quote:
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A home owner has the ability to pull any permit. That does not mean he will pass an inspection. The home owner must still follow the same plumbing code and have the same test as any hired plumber would have to do.

I just spent 2 hours telling a home owner how to cut all his shiny new plumbing out today because of vent issues, fitting use issues etc etc.

Then I get the great privilege of listing with code sections over 40 separate violations. Most of it would have been prevented with a consultation.
one of the towns I work in will let the homeowner do electric, but only after passing a written test at the building dept, if they fail, its a one time chance, and not for plumbing, but that was years ago, so maybe it has changed...
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Old 03-09-2016, 12:35 PM   #15
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Quote:
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so how is it that a homeowner that doesnt know plumbing , be aloud to pull plumbing permits?
First question that came to my mind was why does someone with that view come to a DIY forum. But that aside, I'm pretty sure part of the reason is because if homeowners weren't allowed to pull plumbing permits they'd just do plumbing without a permit anyway and not have the inspection that comes with it and not have a chance to learn from or correct their mistakes. This isn't rocket science and a mistake isn't going to be uncorrectable or in most cases deadly.

Case in point, the kitchen branch I intend to correct. See diagrams showing current setup and how I intend to rebuild it. The currently unvented kitchen branch gets an AAV and both bowls go through 1 trap, dishwasher goes into disposal, use a 2" pipe to the stack. It should look a lot more clean where it currently looks convoluted.

As I think about it, it might make more sense if I move the disposal to the right hand bowl so it's closer to the dishwasher, and the drain on the non-disposal side can be on the side closer to the stack.
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