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Old 05-14-2013, 04:45 PM   #16
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Cast Iron Sewer Pipe 1950s


I just replaced a countertop and kitchen sink for someone this morning that had Galvanized pipes that were installed in the 50's Here is what the inside of the pipe looked like right where it tied into the 4 inch main cast Iron waste stack. Pipe had an S trap, never properly vented. I put in an AAV Under the sink, and ran all new DWV PVC to the soil stack.
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Old 05-14-2013, 06:40 PM   #17
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Cast Iron Sewer Pipe 1950s


I would suggest you get a professional plumber from your area make sure they pull a permit if required by local authority. Get three prices.
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Old 05-14-2013, 10:13 PM   #18
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Cast Iron Sewer Pipe 1950s


added new picture of attic sewer vent in first post. on the bright side, if there's one, is that the sewer vent in attic doesn't look rusty, which i hope means it doesn't have to be replaced. 2 more questions:

1. is it a moisture issue in crawl space that caused it to rust so badly? or, could it be from iron and sulfur reducing bacteria in well water?

2. in what condition would you expect the cast iron pipes in the ground to look? i mean...there are millions of homes with these cast iron sewer pipes in the ground, and not everyone is replacing or inspecting them.

Last edited by Scully; 05-15-2013 at 06:15 AM.
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Old 05-15-2013, 07:50 AM   #19
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Cast Iron Sewer Pipe 1950s


You can start by replacing the sections that leak and do it in phases.

I just did an 8 foot section that started to leak near my basement wall, I dug 4 feet out in front of the house. The pipe going to the street was 1/4" thick after only being in the ground for 120 years.

Since you are talking about pricing here is what it cost me for 8' and some fittings:

1. I dug the hole in front of the house (no charge).
2. I bought the stuff from supply hose ($150) including the hydraulic cement prior to the plumber coming out.
3. Plumber came and installed section of pipe with a clean out and a new drain Y for a future project he used clamps with a stainless band for the transition
4. I backfilled and cemented the basement wall.

$220 for 5 hours of work for the plumber.

*****The plumber is a "friend of a friend". He also knows I enjoy learning. He had the chain snapper, he also tought me how to use the snapper because he knows I will probably do all the accessable pipes going forward (after I buy a snapper). I will probably get one on Fleabay and use it, once the whole house is done, I will unload it.
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Old 05-15-2013, 07:36 PM   #20
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Cast Iron Sewer Pipe 1950s


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scully View Post
2 questions to all:

1. how much would it cost to hire a plumber to replace everything i see in that crawl space?

2. should i be concerned about the pipes beyond the foundation?
It appears to me that there may have been some sort of insulation on the cast elbow in photo 5, and it is entirely possible that acid in the insulation accelerated the destruction of the cast iron pipe. The pipe in the attic looks fine, and I would guess the pipe underground probably is not that bad, as it has not been in open air where oxygen could get to it. You have to make sure you properly support the cast Iron stack with a proper riser clamp when you replace those fittings with PVC. You will need to get numbers locally.
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Old 05-15-2013, 07:41 PM   #21
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Cast Iron Sewer Pipe 1950s


Quote:
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...the house inspector never looked at it when i bought the house.
His report made no mention of the house being due for a re-pipe?
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Old 05-15-2013, 07:49 PM   #22
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His report made no mention of the house being due for a re-pipe?
he did not inspect it because he was in the crawl space for 2 minutes. his only comment was: "it's dry down here."

the house was on septic when it was built in 1955. it's possible that methane from septic could've caused the rusting. i wonder what types of pipes they used when they switched to city sewer.
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Old 05-15-2013, 09:48 PM   #23
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Cast Iron Sewer Pipe 1950s


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scully View Post
he did not inspect it because he was in the crawl space for 2 minutes. his only comment was: "it's dry down here."

the house was on septic when it was built in 1955. it's possible that methane from septic could've caused the rusting. i wonder what types of pipes they used when they switched to city sewer.
the amount of concentrated methane would have to be unrealistically large to corrode the pipe.
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Old 05-24-2013, 11:41 AM   #24
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Cast Iron Sewer Pipe 1950s


The split in the hub is the clue that the CI (except the vent lines!) is likely near the end of it's life. I see there is "MED" on the vent hub in the attic. What it isn't on the hubs is "XH" for extra heavy cast iron. XH is the type that lasts 60+ years
Cut as much out of the wet lines as you can, leave the vent lines in if its too hard to replace them, they should be OK.
I use a small grinder with a metal cut-off wheel to cut CI.
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Old 05-25-2013, 04:41 PM   #25
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The split in the hub is the clue that the CI (except the vent lines!) is likely near the end of it's life. I see there is "MED" on the vent hub in the attic. What it isn't on the hubs is "XH" for extra heavy cast iron. XH is the type that lasts 60+ years
Cut as much out of the wet lines as you can, leave the vent lines in if its too hard to replace them, they should be OK.
I use a small grinder with a metal cut-off wheel to cut CI.
what does "MED" on the vent hub mean? since the plumber will be breaking open the wall in the laundry room, he will remove a small section of the vent line and replace with PVC.

in the future, if i decide to remodel the attic and add a bathroom, can that cast iron vent line be used?
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Old 05-25-2013, 04:47 PM   #26
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Cast Iron Sewer Pipe 1950s


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scully View Post
what does "MED" on the vent hub mean? since the plumber will be breaking open the wall in the laundry room, he will remove a small section of the vent line and replace with PVC.

in the future, if i decide to remodel the attic and add a bathroom, can that cast iron vent line be used?
MED is the grade of the pipe (wall thickness)
You will need to add a waste stack to the upper floor for future plumbing- 3" will handle a bathroom. You cannot use the vent for drainage.
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Old 05-25-2013, 04:52 PM   #27
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Cast Iron Sewer Pipe 1950s


MED--Medium---

The cast iron attic vent can be used for future work---However,once you are cutting into it--you might as well replace the old with new PVC---it is so much easier to work with.
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Old 05-25-2013, 04:59 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheEplumber View Post
MED is the grade of the pipe (wall thickness)
You will need to add a waste stack to the upper floor for future plumbing- 3" will handle a bathroom. You cannot use the vent for drainage.
Quote:
Originally Posted by oh'mike View Post
MED--Medium---

The cast iron attic vent can be used for future work---However,once you are cutting into it--you might as well replace the old with new PVC---it is so much easier to work with.
so the attic vent can be used for drainage?

i have a new roof. will the roof have to be disturbed and fix if i replace the attic cast iron vent?
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Old 05-25-2013, 05:22 PM   #29
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Quote:
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so the attic vent can be used for drainage?

i have a new roof. will the roof have to be disturbed and fix if i replace the attic cast iron vent?
No- it is a dry vent and should remain so. You need to add a separate drain stack from the attic fixtures to the crawl space- then it can connect to the existing building drain. 3" will handle the additional bathroom.
Have your plumber run up a separate drain stack as he replaces the old pipe- he'll understand what you're trying to do
The existing attic portion of the vent can be gingerly removed from the roof jack and replaced with plastic pipe- assuming the boot is only a year old.
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Old 05-25-2013, 07:31 PM   #30
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Cast Iron Sewer Pipe 1950s


Quote:
Originally Posted by tjfslaughter View Post
You can start by replacing the sections that leak and do it in phases.

I just did an 8 foot section that started to leak near my basement wall, I dug 4 feet out in front of the house. The pipe going to the street was 1/4" thick after only being in the ground for 120 years.

Since you are talking about pricing here is what it cost me for 8' and some fittings:

1. I dug the hole in front of the house (no charge).
2. I bought the stuff from supply hose ($150) including the hydraulic cement prior to the plumber coming out.
3. Plumber came and installed section of pipe with a clean out and a new drain Y for a future project he used clamps with a stainless band for the transition
4. I backfilled and cemented the basement wall.

$220 for 5 hours of work for the plumber.

*****The plumber is a "friend of a friend". He also knows I enjoy learning. He had the chain snapper, he also tought me how to use the snapper because he knows I will probably do all the accessable pipes going forward (after I buy a snapper). I will probably get one on Fleabay and use it, once the whole house is done, I will unload it.
you got a great deal at $220

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