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Old 02-28-2012, 10:37 AM   #1
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Can water flow be used to recharge batteries?


Hi;
I am curious as to whether the flow of water through a faucet that uses automatic sensors could be used to spin a small turbine, and generate enough power to recharge batteries in the faucet. My current thinking is that the normal flow of water would not be enough to provide charging current to the batteries, or that such a generator would be too expensive to incorporate into the faucet, with regular battery replacement being the most cost effective method for keeping the faucets working.

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Old 02-28-2012, 10:54 AM   #2
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Can water flow be used to recharge batteries?


this has been discussed in other forums and the bottom line is that the energy generated vs. the cost of the setup and overall reduction in pressure in the line wouldn't make sense. in order to generate electricity, you have to create quite a bit of friction (i.e. backpressure) in the line to run a "generator" of some sort. using just a small amount of "extra" pressure in the line where it wouldn't reduce the overall house pressure too much would generate so little electricity that it isn't worth it. also, it would only be generating electricity while the water was running which is a small fraction of the day.

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Old 02-28-2012, 11:19 AM   #3
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Can water flow be used to recharge batteries?


I've never even heard of this before. My personal idea is to create an exercise bike that has a turbine/transformer/converter in it that would generate electricity while your on it. Good way to get the wife to lose a few and save money on your electricity.

Disclaimer: If you come to market with such a device, I expect 50% royalties per annum.
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Old 02-28-2012, 11:25 AM   #4
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Can water flow be used to recharge batteries?


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Originally Posted by psilva8 View Post
I've never even heard of this before. My personal idea is to create an exercise bike that has a turbine/transformer/converter in it that would generate electricity while your on it. Good way to get the wife to lose a few and save money on your electricity.

Disclaimer: If you come to market with such a device, I expect 50% royalties per annum.
lol, i like that idea. might even get myself to lose a few. i wonder what kind of wattage the average person could generate.
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Old 02-28-2012, 11:44 AM   #5
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Can water flow be used to recharge batteries?


Quote:
Originally Posted by psilva8 View Post
I've never even heard of this before. My personal idea is to create an exercise bike that has a turbine/transformer/converter in it that would generate electricity while your on it. Good way to get the wife to lose a few and save money on your electricity.

Disclaimer: If you come to market with such a device, I expect 50% royalties per annum.
Years ago I remember reading something like this. Supposedly a guy hooked up an exercise bike to the TV in his kid's room. If the kid wanted to watch TV, he had to work for it.
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Old 02-28-2012, 11:50 AM   #6
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Can water flow be used to recharge batteries?


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Originally Posted by NitroNate View Post
lol, i like that idea. might even get myself to lose a few. i wonder what kind of wattage the average person could generate.
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Originally Posted by Blondesense View Post
Years ago I remember reading something like this. Supposedly a guy hooked up an exercise bike to the TV in his kid's room. If the kid wanted to watch TV, he had to work for it.
OK, who is willing to paypal me the 500k to get this thing going?
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Old 02-28-2012, 12:24 PM   #7
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Can water flow be used to recharge batteries?


A 20 YO male can probably put out 1 hp for 30 seconds and 180w for 10 minutes.
You don't need an exercise machine to measure either of these values.

The power in water flow; hp = GPM x PSI/1700. If your bathtub delivers 6 GPM at 5 PSI you get 13w.


Last edited by Yoyizit; 02-28-2012 at 02:34 PM.
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