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-   -   Can I Move Toilet Drain Into Wall? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/can-i-move-toilet-drain-into-wall-148432/)

Toilet Bowl 06-27-2012 03:52 PM

Can I Move Toilet Drain Into Wall?
 
Hello folks, I want to move my toilet but its on concrete and I really don't want to have to jackhammer it up. So my question is can I redirect it up into the wall thru the framing? Sorry I have zero knowledge in plumbing but will read up if I have to. Just wanted to know if its possible.

I want to move it to where the toilet paper thing is. The pipe coming up from the ground is no problem cause I would extend the shower (from the left side) all the way to the other wall (where the toilet paper is) and build a seating area to conceal it.

http://i49.tinypic.com/dpfi4k.jpg


http://i49.tinypic.com/298w7r.jpg

the venting can be easily moved as well.

joecaption 06-27-2012 03:56 PM

A whole lot of work for little gain.
The floor would have to be jack hammered out all the way under the wall, you would need at least a 6" thick wall for the drain pipe.

Toilet Bowl 06-27-2012 04:11 PM

damn, I really need more space on the wall. as of now my max shower size can be 30" wide. I'm assuming If I were to build the wall out with another 2x4 I'd have sufficient space? Moving the toilet like this is pretty much my only viable option

wkearney99 06-27-2012 08:19 PM

Just where do you think the toilet would drain where it to go "into the wall"? There are such things as toilets that recess their tank and have their drain in the wall cavity. They're not cheap and it still has to drain down to a sewer line. Where is the other line you'd use?

It'd be a lot simpler to just rent a jackhammer and do it right. Bust the floor, re-route the plumbing (properly) and concrete it over again.

Honestly, if you didn't know enough to already know this answer, then perhaps you really should consider speaking with a local plumbing professional about it.

Bonzai 06-27-2012 08:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wkearney99 (Post 952890)
Just where do you think the toilet would drain where it to go "into the wall"? There are such things as toilets that recess their tank and have their drain in the wall cavity. They're not cheap and it still has to drain down to a sewer line. Where is the other line you'd use?

It'd be a lot simpler to just rent a jackhammer and do it right. Bust the floor, re-route the plumbing (properly) and concrete it over again.

If you didn't know enough to already know this answer, the perhaps you really should consider speaking with a local plumbing professional about it.

The type of toilet referred to above is typically in the region of $1200 cost (here in BC anyway) ... no idea where in the world you are so that may mean nothing. If you can afford one of these wall mounted toilets then you can afford to do it right ... jack hammer time!

joecaption 06-27-2012 08:25 PM

I must be missing something, mounting it to the wall would not gain a single inch of space.
Even the way it is now looks like it was installed to close to the wall.
http://homerenovations.about.com/od/...bathlayout.htm

Bonzai 06-27-2012 08:27 PM

Any by the way, you probably want to place a rag in that drain for now unless you find the smell of sewer gases something that particularly rocks your world :whistling2:

ben's plumbing 06-27-2012 09:25 PM

its not practical to even do that....jack hammer the floor....:yes:

Toilet Bowl 06-27-2012 09:26 PM

Just took it out today, thanks for the tip on covering it, and the placement is fine, theres 15 and 15" to each side. Also I'll be buying a rear drain toilet, so the drain can come from the wall they're pretty much the same price

Heres my idea on paper, I think my post was misunderstood. All I wanted to know was If i could move the drain from the toilet to a new location by moving the drain thru the wall

http://i46.tinypic.com/24y1bhx.jpg

Bonzai 06-28-2012 01:59 AM

Ok so all the pros who have responded are telling you bad idea ... And also if you are in North America or UK (the areas I am generally familiar with) then this does not meet code in most if not all areas. Not only would you have to notch out studs in that back wall totally (is it a load bearing wall) but also you will have to raise the shower such that the curb would be a silly height. I guess if you want to spend way more time and money and end up with a bathroom that is not to code (depending where you are of course as we don't know) then go for it ... But if you actually want constructive feedback then jack hammer the floor and do it right.

wkearney99 06-28-2012 07:59 AM

You're planning on running behind the wall and back into the existing toilet flange? And how do you expect that to work? As in, it will not work. Do not do this. Mistakes with sewage get expensive and nasty. Do not do this. If something goes wrong with your re-routed nonsense then you'll have to bust open the whole shower bench covering it.

Just do it the right way. Bust open the concrete and move the toilet flange properly. This is not a hard job. Fixing a half-ass nightmare WILL BE.

oh'mike 06-28-2012 08:21 AM

Opening the slab with a jack hammer--3 hours tops---

Your plan will not pass code--it will be a drainage failure---and the elevated floor will look like a mess.

By the time you allow for the shower P-trap your shower will be 10 inches above the floor--

Toilet Bowl 06-28-2012 03:20 PM

alright I'll look into the jack hammer way, thanks

but to be clear, nothing is elevated. the drain pipe will be concealed under a shower seat and the wall is not load bearing, i was going to build it out to accommodate anyway. and i live in canada.

Toilet Bowl 06-28-2012 03:43 PM

does someone wanna tell me why it'll fail tho? adding the pipe up, and behind a wall back out to the new location seemed like a quick fix to me

Evstarr 06-28-2012 03:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Toilet Bowl
does someone wanna tell me why it'll fail tho? adding the pipe up, and behind a wall back out to the new location seemed like a quick fix to me

You'd have to cut off the flange, attach a 90 facing back, pipe into the wall, another 90 to turn sideways, run new pipe in the wall sloping up, 90 out of the wall,stub out to the toilet flange location, add another 90 pointing up, attach a new flange, box in the pipes and build a sturdy platform about 16+ inches high to sit the toilet on top of, which means steps... Etc etc

Hmm come to think of it, that really would be a throne wouldn't it?

Plus with all those turns, it would tend to clog. And, if takes you more than about 5 feet, you'd have to open the floor any way to remove the existing trap and move it to the new location because you can't have 2 traps on a fixture.


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