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-   -   Broke the Tub Drain Crosspiece, Now What? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/broke-tub-drain-crosspiece-now-what-22259/)

MrBill_DIY 06-14-2008 04:11 PM

Broke the Tub Drain Crosspiece, Now What?
 
I was trying to remove the tub drain crosspiece, in order to replace it, and the crosspiece broke. I was following the method recommended: sticking the handle of a pair of pliers into the crosspiece and turning the pliers. The crosspiece part of the drain just snapped -- I didn't even turn it all that hard.

What should I do next? I understand that plumbers have a special tool designed for removing these things. I don't suppose that Home Depot would have something like that, would it? Or should I just give up and call a plumber?:mad:

Alan 06-14-2008 06:49 PM

the 'special tool' uses the same crossbars to unscrew as you were turning using the pliers.

If there is still any metal left, you might be able to get the 'special tool' to work. Home Depot does carry them.

http://s7.sears.com/is/image/Sears/0...sm=0.9,0.5,0,0

Ron The Plumber 06-14-2008 06:53 PM

Or this one if the other don't work.

http://www.plumbingstore.com/images/tool-drainkey.jpg

MrBill_DIY 06-14-2008 07:13 PM

Thanks, I did some internet research and found a third tool sold at Lowes, called a tub drain removal dumbell wrench, made by Superior. I think I'll try that first. It seems that breaking the crosspiece is a common problem, which I guess is why they make the tool to work without the crosspiece.

Mike Swearingen 06-15-2008 11:33 AM

In lieu of a special tool, I simply cut a small "V" notch in the lip of the drain with a hacksaw blade, and drive the drain around counter-clockwise with a hammer and screwdriver or chisel in the notch to unscrew it.
Heat the drain with a hair dryer first to soften the old plumber's putty.
Good Luck!
Mike

Alan 06-15-2008 01:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mike Swearingen (Post 130579)
In lieu of a special tool, I simply cut a small "V" notch in the lip of the drain with a hacksaw blade, and drive the drain around counter-clockwise with a hammer and screwdriver or chisel in the notch to unscrew it.
Heat the drain with a hair dryer first to soften the old plumber's putty.
Good Luck!
Mike

Never thought of that one before! Still don't want to hit it too hard, though.

MrBill_DIY 06-15-2008 03:19 PM

I bought the "dumbell wrench" sold at Lowes, but it just broke off the remaining bits of the crosspiece. The label says it will remove tub drains without a crosspiece, but I don't see how because there's nothing else for it to grab. Anyway, I tried wrapping duct tape around the wrench to make it thick enough to grab the inside of the drain, and that did create a lot of grabbing, but still not enough to turn the drain. I also tried softening the putty with a hairdryer, and that didn't help either. So I went online and bought "The Drain Key" that Ron suggested (it expands to grab the inside of the drain), and it should be here in a few days. I thought of doing something like Mike's trick with cutting a notch in the lip of the drain, but that seems a little risky at this point, and I'm not feeling lucky right now.

Mike Swearingen 06-15-2008 04:02 PM

I should have said "tap" instead of drive, but it has always worked for me.
Mike

ttboy001 06-18-2011 10:04 PM

You just helped another DIYer
 
Bravo Mike,

Your suggested fix worked out for me, and saved me the $30 on the drain key. Then I found out that I have a 1 3/8" fine threaded drain instead of the rather common 1 1/2" variety that now dominate the shelves. I found only one style, but had to go to the city over to purchase as the store in my town had none left.

You have got to love the "projects".

Honestly, thanks for the post Mike.

PS. I registered just to reply to this post.....very appreciative.

Mike Swearingen 06-19-2011 03:40 AM

Hey, no problem. You're very welcome, but I'm 68 and have been DIYing for more than 50 years and everything that I supposedly "know", I learned from others. There's always more than one way to skin a cat and that's what DIYing is all about. It's great fun to me, and I'm still doing it all of the time. Going to replace some old warped and split boards out on my pier and dock today (Father's Day 2011), for instance...it'll be one old warped board on another, but I'll Git-'R-Done. lol
Thank you,
Mike

abfall99 04-30-2012 10:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mike Swearingen (Post 130579)
In lieu of a special tool, I simply cut a small "V" notch in the lip of the drain with a hacksaw blade, and drive the drain around counter-clockwise with a hammer and screwdriver or chisel in the notch to unscrew it.
Heat the drain with a hair dryer first to soften the old plumber's putty.
Good Luck!
Mike

Howdy Mike, same problem here... crosshairs broke after using the usual tool:
(BrassCraft Tub Drain Removal Tool from Home Depot).
http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...&storeId=10051

The Drainkey from Lowes has nothing but 1 star reviews.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_272239-943-0...=#BVRRWidgetID

So thought of trying your method. You're suggesting cutting into the lip/vertical piece of the drain with a very small hacksaw? Would banging it with a chisel and hammer give it enough leverage to then turn the drain?

jaydevries 04-30-2012 11:37 PM

before i got this tool by rector seal
http://www.rectorseal.com/Golden-Ext...Drain-Tool.php

i always used a cold chisel and hammer. put chisel on inside of drain lip hit it straight on till i got a good notch then hit on angle to unscrew repeat when notch moves enough where you can not get good hit with hammer.untill loose enough to turn by internal drain wrench or drain tool

http://www.ridgid.com/Tools/Internal...h/EN/index.htm

plummen 05-01-2012 07:04 AM

Dremel with a cut off wheel works also :)

ben's plumbing 05-02-2012 09:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alan (Post 130589)
Never thought of that one before! Still don't want to hit it too hard, though.

it works well do it all the time as you said have to be careful not to damage to tub.....Iam a surgeon with a sawzall..:laughing::laughing:


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