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splint 01-12-2013 10:30 AM

booster?
 
I recently read thru the forum dealing with boosting the water pressure and couldnt really find the answer i need. We are on a county coop water line that we share with another family member on our farm.The water pressure in our home is very weak.I realize that i need to install a booster,but every plumber i have talked to tells me to order a different brand and different setup(tank or non tank).I really just need your expert opinion on a good brand to buy and setup.thanks

joecaption 01-12-2013 10:37 AM

Is it really a pressure problum or a flow problum?
Undersized lines, old steel pipes, pluged up aeriators on the faucets, no or undersized pressure tank can all cause the same issues.

Does no good to increase the pressure if there's not enough flow.
Stand on a garden h ose and see just how much flow you get, pressure will go up on one side but less comes out on the other.

splint 01-12-2013 10:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1091680)
Is it really a pressure problum or a flow problum?
Undersized lines, old steel pipes, pluged up aeriators on the faucets, no or undersized pressure tank can all cause the same issues.

Does no good to increase the pressure if there's not enough flow.
Stand on a garden h ose and see just how much flow you get, pressure will go up on one side but less comes out on the other.

pressure problem.already been checked,county coop reduced their output pressure a few months ago at their storage about a mile from here due to their aging underground pipes.

joecaption 01-12-2013 11:33 AM

http://www.ehow.com/how-does_5008387...anks-work.html

AllanJ 01-12-2013 02:23 PM

All pump systems require a pressure tank downstream of the pump.

How large a pressure tank you need depends on how much water you might draw at one time and whether the supply can keep up with the pump over a long period of time. It is undesirable for your pump to draw water so fast that your neighbor loses all pressure.

Method 1 would use a pump with a fairly low gallons per minute rating (to avoid cutting off your neighbor) and a large, say 100 plus gallon, pressure tank that doubles as a storage tank. You would be able to draw a reasonable amount of water, enough for more than one shower or a full washing machine cycle, while the pump refills the tank at its leisure. The tank capacity should be more than twice the amount of water you are likely to draw at one time. To be able to draw half the tank's capacity, you calibrate the tank pressure to (and you must find acceptable for usage) half the pump turn off pressure even though the pump turn on pressure might not be that low.

Method 2 uses a nonpressurized tank (cistern) upstream of the pump as well as the pressure tank (need not be more than 20 gallons now) downstream. The cistern is filled using just the pressure from the supply line and can use a float similar to that in a toilet tank to turn the incoming water on and off. The pump can be of relatively high gallons per minute rating.

Because a cistern requires drawing in makeup air from the atmosphere, you may need additional chlorination or other treatment at your house and a way to keep bugs out.


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