DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Plumbing (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/)
-   -   Best practices for Water Heater install? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/best-practices-water-heater-install-154537/)

simanco 08-22-2012 10:50 PM

Best practices for Water Heater install?
 
Howdy all,

Tomorrow I'll be exchanging our seeping electric water heater for a new one. Currently the water heater sits directly underneath a convoluted junction of water pipes. Kitchen, upstairs, incoming cold water and the washing machine feed are all joined in a mess above the water heater.

We've had a leak in that mess before, with it draining onto the top of the water heater, causing some rust.

All the piping is 1/2 & 3/4 CPVC and it is currently connected to the water heater with what appears to be copper flex of some sort.

So ... what's the best way to plumb a water heater into CPVC?

Is there any reason NOT to shift the water heater out from under all those connections? Or, is there any good reason to keep it there? It's centrally located and the longest run is straight up through two floors to the upstairs bath.

The easiest thing to do will be to pick up two new pieces of that flex pipe and put it back where it is, but I'm more interested in "the right way."

Also, is there any reason to elevate it? I've seen some water heaters setting on top of blocks. It's sitting on dry concrete in a dry basement.

Is there any problem in running the T&P overflow into the condensate pump for the HVAC?

Thanks so much,
Jim

Canucker 08-22-2012 11:00 PM

Any pics so we can get a look at your current set up? It would help with the recommendations. I'm thinking a manifold off your outlet with home runs to every outlet. Do you need a mixing valve in your area? I wouldn't bother piping it to your condensate pump, it might work if the relief was weeping but there's no way it'll keep up if it actually opens on pressure

joecaption 08-22-2012 11:12 PM

Just set it in a drain pan, there sold right next to the water heaters.
Those stands are made for gas heaters.

hvac benny 08-22-2012 11:14 PM

If you pipe the t&p into the condensate pump, and the discharge of the t&p is below the water level, the back pressure could potentially stop it from functioning, and you now have a 40 gallon bomb in your basement. It's best to just pipe it straight down, into a drain if you have one. Never pipe it up, into a trap or into a bucket.

TheEplumber 08-23-2012 12:36 AM

See my comments with **
Quote:

Originally Posted by simanco (Post 994416)
Howdy all,

Tomorrow I'll be exchanging our seeping electric water heater for a new one. Currently the water heater sits directly underneath a convoluted junction of water pipes. Kitchen, upstairs, incoming cold water and the washing machine feed are all joined in a mess above the water heater.

We've had a leak in that mess before, with it draining onto the top of the water heater, causing some rust.

All the piping is 1/2 & 3/4 CPVC and it is currently connected to the water heater with what appears to be copper flex of some sort.

So ... what's the best way to plumb a water heater into CPVC?
**Use Use CPVC x MIP adapters or "sharkbites". Then you can connect braided or copper flex supply lines to the heater

Is there any reason NOT to shift the water heater out from under all those connections? Or, is there any good reason to keep it there? It's centrally located and the longest run is straight up through two floors to the upstairs bath.
**If you expect more overhead leaks, move the tank a little- or leave it. Need to consider your wire length too
If it was a little to the side you could make future overhead repairs easier

The easiest thing to do will be to pick up two new pieces of that flex pipe and put it back where it is, but I'm more interested in "the right way."
**Not a code violation to be under pipes. It'll be fine
Also, is there any reason to elevate it? I've seen some water heaters setting on top of blocks. It's sitting on dry concrete in a dry basement.
**No reason, but you might consider a styrofoam pad. I only use pans to protect finished floors/ceilings and have a place to drain it to
Is there any problem in running the T&P overflow into the condensate pump for the HVAC?
**won't do any good. If the valve blows that little pump won't keep up

Thanks so much,
Jim



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:02 AM.