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Pddc 03-28-2013 11:27 PM

Bathroom Smell - Wrong install of vent, AAV?
 
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I renovated my basement bathroom last year and installed an air admittance valve to vent the bathroom without fully understanding how it works.

Now I feel there is some smell coming out. Not sure it's from the valve or some other thing, as I kept the valve in the wall (yes I know..., i know where it is exactly, just wanted to avoid putting an ugly trap door there)

Is the place I installed the valve wrong?

If so, how would I be able to vent this bathroom?

Drawing attached. Thanks so much for your input

Javiles 03-29-2013 11:27 AM

Location please..

Pddc 03-29-2013 11:55 AM

It's in the basement

fetzer85 03-29-2013 01:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pddc (Post 1148429)
It's in the basement

No...where do you live? :-)

Pddc 03-29-2013 01:11 PM

Montreal, canada

joeplumber85 03-29-2013 02:33 PM

Your entire basement rough-in was done improperly, it is not correctly sized or vented properly and SHOULD be redone properly.

An AAV is sometimes permissable in certain situations but can only be used to vent 1 fixture. In your current set up the toilet & shower are not considered vented, nor is the basin which also will have an illegal S trap given the rough-in. The code violations concerning your rough-in are all related to drain flow and trap siphonage, which will be allowing sewer gas into the bathroom.

Your best and most cost effective solution would be to open the basin wall up and tie the utility sink vent and a new basin vent together and then run them up thru the roof or tie them into a nearby existing vent. Your toilet will still not be properly vented but the other 3 fixtures will be and this should eliminate the sewer gas smell.

The cheap/short-term fix would be to install another AAV for the basin with the S trap and that is most likely the guilty fixture for the majority of sewer gas smell, but you will most likely still have issues with sewer gas escaping from the shower trap but not as frequently as you currrently are.

Pddc 03-29-2013 08:10 PM

Joe, Thanks for the time to analyze the situation. Needless to say I'm disappointed that my first and only project has the downfalls you mention given I tried to research as much before pouring the concrete!

Living and learning, and that's ok. I took the risk after refusing a quote I thought was exorbitant

When you say incorrectly sized, why would that be? it's 3"for the toilet, 2" (I believe for the shower and sink

the basin, is actually a p trap if I understand correctly as it comes out of a T from the wall.

For the vent, isn't it impractical to run a vent to the roof for a basement bathroom? I have a main and 2nd floor. the only pipe that goes all the way to the roof, is the vent that also brings the sewage to the 4" pipe you see on the picture. In these cases, how is it correctly done?

thanks so much for your time.

joeplumber85 03-29-2013 08:46 PM

Sizing drainage lines is based on more then just what fixture is being served by the drainage pipes. A toilet must be a minimum 3" pipe, the vent for a toilet can 1 1/2" if it's dry and is under a maximum length. In your instance, if properly vented, you'd be wet venting that toilet thru the vent @ the utility sink. However, you've exceeded the hydraulic load permitted for wet venting a toilet through a 2" pipe and it should of been up-sized to 3" if run the way you currently have it run.

According to your drawing there is no vent serving the basin, so why would there be a tee fitting in the wall? What is coming out of the top of the tee if there is no vent or AAV there? If there is no vent, then following your p-trap the drainage pipes would most likely go directly down into your 2" branch. Thus making an S-trap.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pddc (Post 1148659)
For the vent, isn't it impractical to run a vent to the roof for a basement bathroom? I have a main and 2nd floor. the only pipe that goes all the way to the roof, is the vent that also brings the sewage to the 4" pipe you see on the picture. In these cases, how is it correctly done?

thanks so much for your time.

As far as the vent goes, you must have multiple vents if you have multiple bathrooms, laundry facilities or a kitchen. Most likely they merge together in the attic or somewhere before leaving the roof in a 2-3" vent.

Yes it is impractical to run a vent through the roof from a basement, but not as impractical to install a bathroom where one was not designed to go. If this was being done correctly, a professional plumber would survey your house and determine if it was easier to
a) tie into an existing vent on the main floor
b) run a separate vent up through the main floor/upper floor and either connect to a vent in the attic, or go through the room.
c) go thru the side of the house and run up through the roof that way.

Pddc 03-29-2013 09:00 PM

The tee is there in case I had to add an extra aav. It extends up and is capped. I could easily add an extra one if it would make it better, but you say its not the way to go.


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