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-   -   bathroom in basement (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/bathroom-basement-19730/)

analogmusicman 04-10-2008 02:42 AM

bathroom in basement
 
ok, I DID read some earlier threads about basement toilets. I just have a few questions.
my plan is to install a "powder room" (just a toilet and sink) in the basement and yes there is water and drain available there. the drain is currently a 2" or so drain from a sink which will be taken out. this drain goes down into the concrete and I guess it connects to the larger drain pipe down there. so, I'm going to have to break up some concrete. my question is, how far beneath the top of the floor is that larger pipe located usually? the house was built in '79 so it's probably ABS right? do I cut into that ABS and install a tee? the toilet flange is cast iron so it must attach to some ABS from the tee, how does it attach, with cement? what about venting? oh yes, exactlly HOW do you break up the concrete, a jackhammer?
any comments,suggestions,answers,derision gladly accepted:yes:

tnx,

Gencon 04-10-2008 07:23 AM

Yup, rent a jackhammer.

The toilet drain will be 3" and will connect to the 4" main with a wye.
Somewhere between 18" and 5' from the toilet flange, there should be a 3x3x2 wye that the vanity drain ties into. Since the vanity only requires a 1 1/4" drain, this 2" pipe also acts as a wet vent for the toilet. Inside the wall, where the vanity trap arm connects, you will need a 2x1 1/2x1 1/4" tee.
The 2" goes down for the wet vent, the 1 1/4" is the branch for the vanity connection and the 1 1/2" goes up to vent both fixtures.
Your house may have a vent connection roughed in already-look for a 1 1/2" pipe stubbed down through the floor with a cap on it- careful when you remove the cap, it may be full of water.
If there is no vent rough in, you will have to connect your vent on the next floor up above the flood level rim of the highest fixture. This is usually done somewhere above the bathroom sink, only if its 1 1/2" already, otherwise you have to tie into the main vent stack. If this is a bungalow, it may be easier to connect to the vent stack in the attic.Drill holes through the bottom of a wall from the basement and another through the top of the wall in the attic, and feed the pipe straight up through the wall. Its important that both holes line up.

Marlin 04-10-2008 07:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by analogmusicman (Post 115169)
ok, I DID read some earlier threads about basement toilets. I just have a few questions.
my plan is to install a "powder room" (just a toilet and sink) in the basement and yes there is water and drain available there. the drain is currently a 2" or so drain from a sink which will be taken out. this drain goes down into the concrete and I guess it connects to the larger drain pipe down there. so, I'm going to have to break up some concrete. my question is, how far beneath the top of the floor is that larger pipe located usually? the house was built in '79 so it's probably ABS right? do I cut into that ABS and install a tee? the toilet flange is cast iron so it must attach to some ABS from the tee, how does it attach, with cement? what about venting? oh yes, exactlly HOW do you break up the concrete, a jackhammer?
any comments,suggestions,answers,derision gladly accepted:yes:

tnx,

Cast iron isn't a thing of the past. It is still required underground (around here) and for all commercial applications. If you're toilet flange is cast iron you probably have cast iron pipes under your slab. You will need special sawzall blades and a steady hand to cut it, or a special snap cutter made for cutting cast iron (much easier but pricey).
The line is usually 6" to 18" under the slab. That larger line could be anywhere, you could well have 2" pipe run 20' across your basement before tieing into the larger line. You can tell by finding the stacks in your basement then finding your house trap (if you have one). It will usually be a straight shot from the stack to the house trap but their are no guarantees.
A jackhammer is the usual tool of choice for cutting the concrete. You get a much cleaner looking cut using a saw cut though. The drawback to that again is cost. Even if you rent they make you buy the blade which isn't cheap. They also make a ton of dust which can be kept down to a degree by running a hose on the floor as you go.
Call your local building inspector and make sure you can use PVC underground, you might have to use cast if you're under the same codes as I am. You will also cut in a wye, not a tee for the toilet. The toilet also needs to be properly vented.

analogmusicman 04-10-2008 09:15 PM

thanks for all the great info you guys! this is sounding like a big hassle especially if like you say, I just MIGHT run into some cast iron pipe. I like to DIY but as they say "discretion is the better part of valor" so I'll probably farm out the work to a plumber. any ideas what the approximate cost would be just to have somebody put a toilet drain in? any plumbers out there in the colorado springs area?

tnx,

analogmusicman 04-11-2008 09:41 PM

If you're toilet flange is cast iron you probably have cast iron pipes under your slab



I thought ALL toilet flanges are cast iron...you mean there are some that AREN'T?

tnx,

Calm_Blue_Ocean 04-11-2008 09:54 PM

Where I live there is no cast iron, everything is PVC or ABS and the local stores only stock ABS flanges (it depends where you live). I would be very surprised if your pipes are anything other than cast iron under the slab (I can't imagine anyone sticking a cast iron flange on anything else). Don't be too scared by the jackhammering, I just did my basement and it was much easier than expected. Dealing with cast iron (from what I've read) may be a little trickier.

Marlin 04-12-2008 04:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by analogmusicman (Post 115703)
If you're toilet flange is cast iron you probably have cast iron pipes under your slab



I thought ALL toilet flanges are cast iron...you mean there are some that AREN'T?

tnx,

Nope, they make them out of PVC, PVC and steel, copper, and brass.

Boston Plumber 04-12-2008 01:26 PM

5 Attachment(s)
Hi Guys:

Just a little visual help over there for analogmusicman...;)

Like Marlin said, flanges come in all sorts of materials (see pics.) as well as cast iron.

Good day!!

analogmusicman 04-12-2008 11:06 PM

boy, I'm getting some kind of education from you people in this forum (all topics):thumbup:

tnx,


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