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-   -   Bath tub leaking through Drain (http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/bath-tub-leaking-through-drain-19228/)

nitu_752002 03-30-2008 09:50 AM

Bath tub leaking through Drain
 
Hi

Our bath tub was leaking through the drain and we found out once the water started dripping onto our main floor dining room. Anyway, now we have a whole on the main floor ceiling thats about the size of an inch and a leaking drain.

We tried to pour a bucket of water and it leaked, we tried pouring a jug of water straight into the drain and it leaked so i think the leak is from somewhere under the tub. We have a closet right behind the tub area. Would it be possible to get access to the tub drain from the closet or would we have to cut the ceiling on the main floor? Also does anyone have any good ways of hiding the patch work if we cut from the main floor. We had one quote to fix the leak from main floor ceiling and then respray the entire ceiling and that was $900.

Please help.
Thanks

Ron The Plumber 03-30-2008 10:12 AM

Best to access the drain of the tub from below, as you might need to replace the entire waste and overflow assembly, this will also allow the moister in the ceiling to dry out.

Double A 03-30-2008 01:03 PM

Unless you just do not want to make a claim, then your homeowners insurance usually pays for the damage caused by the leak, but not the leak itself.

I would get more than one estimate on the damage repairs and hire the contractor directly to fix it, instead of using one of your insurance companies choosing.

This may not be the route you want to go, as you will most likely have a deductible to pay, and after paying that, may have paid out the cost of all or most of the damage repairs, and you'll have a claim on your record. Some companies will drop your coverage for more than x number of claims in y number of months.

I agree with opening the ceiling up and repairing from below, as this allows the best access and view of the problem. It might be necessary in any case, as access from an adjacent wall might not be inadequate.

Other than being ugly and letting in some drafts (and making a mess) there is no real problem with opening that ceiling up some (removing the drywall) to expose the area and allow it to start drying out. It will need to be very dry to allow for proper repairs anyway.

GL.

nitu_752002 03-30-2008 01:23 PM

Hi I don't think the leak is big enough to be on the home insurance and like you said, i think our deductible will cover most of the expense. The whole on the ceiling is about an 1 inch and the water mark is about 3 inch right now. I hope this can be fixed for much less cost than my initial quote. Thanks

plumber Jim 03-30-2008 07:32 PM

Your best bet is to bite the bullet and open the ceiling. It won't cost any more to patch a 12" x 12" hole than it would for a 2" x 2" hole. plus If you pay a plumber to come fix it he will have to make that same hole anyways. who knows maybe you will find that its just a loose tub show gasket or a slip nut if that the type of waste and overflow that was used. at the very least if you can see the leak in the ceiling you can get a better estimate as to what the cost will be to repair it.







http://www.broomfieldplumber.com

Double A 03-31-2008 09:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nitu_752002 (Post 112216)
Hi I don't think the leak is big enough to be on the home insurance and like you said, i think our deductible will cover most of the expense. The whole on the ceiling is about an 1 inch and the water mark is about 3 inch right now. I hope this can be fixed for much less cost than my initial quote. Thanks

I think you're missing the point here. Open the ceiling. It will have to be opened in any case. Let it start drying now.

If I were to come to make this plumbing repair, I would want to open the ceiling in all areas that have water spots and or pipes from that tub. I would want to do this to be sure I have made all the needed repairs and that all the leaks have been repaired before the ceiling is repaired.

Once the leaks are repaired, leave the ceiling unrepaired for a few days once the tub is put back into service. This will allow inspection and some degree of assurance that you have gotten all the leaks. Its not uncommon for a tub to leak from more than one spot, and usually, its not the fault of the plumbing, but rather the tub surround.


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