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Old 07-08-2014, 01:10 PM   #1
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Basement stool


We have a basement stool that we first had an issue with it not wanting to flush. I then discovered that it also was leaking around the base.
I removed the stool and replaced the wax seal ring and flange but it still leaked. So I replaced the seal again and it still leaks.

It still doesn't want to flush and I have run a 50 foot drain snake down the drain and it seems to be open. We have had out septic tank emptied also. I have disconnected the water to the stool for the time being.

I'm sure when we flush the upstairs stools or run water it is coming back around where it leaks in the basement stool.

So I detest plumbing problems, it seldom turns out to be good. What do I need to be looking for to be the real issue? Is the stool cracked or is the some other issue with the mounting flange in the floor?

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Old 07-08-2014, 01:18 PM   #2
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Basement stool


By stool, I would like to assume a toilet. If Im right, then heres my response. If Im wrong, yall can laugh lol.

Check where the TANK mounts to the BOWL. It attaches by way of 2 bolts with nuts and washers. One on the left one on the right. In the middle of the tank, connected to the bowl there is a thick gasket (tank to bowl gasket). Check to see if thats the leak, if so its a fairly easy fix. It may NOT be leaking from the base, but if these things dont fix it then there could well be a crack in the S pipe that is causing the leak.

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Old 07-08-2014, 01:43 PM   #3
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Basement stool


Sorry....yes, toilet. It leaks at the base of the stool at the floor. Is there a way to cap off the floor drain so that it doesn't have back flow?
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Old 07-08-2014, 02:17 PM   #4
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Yes, they sell 3 or 4 inch drain plugs for toilet drains at any big box or local plumbing supply store. Just need the right size.

If You know that the toilet has a crack at the base, and leaking, it will need to be replaced.

Last edited by jmon; 07-08-2014 at 02:27 PM.
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Old 07-08-2014, 02:20 PM   #5
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so would a cracked base cause it to not flush?
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Old 07-08-2014, 02:25 PM   #6
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I wouldn't think so. You may have other issues going on. Clogged vent perhaps, idk.

Basement toilets sometime need an additional pump if below grade. Did the toilet always flush before?

Please wait for the plumbers to respond to your post. Thanks.

Last edited by jmon; 07-08-2014 at 02:38 PM.
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Old 07-08-2014, 05:40 PM   #7
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Basement stool


If your upstairs plumbing is causing your basement stool to leak. Then you have a problem with your line to the septic tank. Or your entire underground plumbing system is installed sloping to your basement stool.

I would suggest you have a professional camera and snake your drain from the basement stool.

Because unless your rod was a minimal size of 3/4 inch with a cutting head as large as the inside of your pipe you have not snaked anything.
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Old 07-08-2014, 06:48 PM   #8
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We have never had an issue with it flushing prior to this recent issue. We have lived at this residence for 5 years and not had a problem.
We just had the entire septic system pumped a couple of days ago.
I did find that the part that the stool attaches (bolts to I think it is referred to as a closet flange?) on the floor I believe is broken. I'm thinking that may be part of the issue?
For the time being I have removed the stool and plugged it. How difficult is it to replace the flange?
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Old 07-08-2014, 07:48 PM   #9
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Can you post a close up picture of it? Thanks.
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Old 07-08-2014, 08:15 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denjinks View Post
I did find that the part that the stool attaches (bolts to I think it is referred to as a closet flange?) on the floor I believe is broken. I'm thinking that may be part of the issue?
Still shouldn't affect the toilet flushing. Most reasons toilets won't flush are; glog line, something bad with toilet itself (fill valve, flapper, etc.), bad vent, bad pump (if equiped) or pipe shifted and slopes back to toilet. Just my opinion.

For the time being I have removed the stool and plugged it. How difficult is it to replace the flange?
Is it bolted into concrete? Can you post a picture? Thanks.
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Old 07-08-2014, 08:25 PM   #11
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Basement stool


Does the toilet's line down into the floor and then straight out to the septic system? Or is there an ejector pump somewhere else in the system that handles elevating the waste up to the septic system? Because if it's the latter then you might have a problem with that unit. But if it's just a straight run to the septic system then something along that line is blocked, perhaps only partially.

That you had it recently pumped makes me wonder if something related to that might have gone wrong.

Your best bet is to pay to have someone come out with a sewer line inspection camera setup. Have them scope the line to confirm if it's clear or not.

If your upstairs plumbing causes this to overflow periodically then capping it is NOT THE ANSWER. You'd be subjecting that cap to a lot more pressure as the upstairs waste backs up. WHEN it fails you're looking at a veritable FOUNTAIN of crap likely to spout up from it.

Find and fix the leak. Skip capping anything.
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Old 07-08-2014, 08:55 PM   #12
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I think the line "y's" into the main one to the septic tank. I have a theory that one of my grandchildren may have "flushed" something down.

Also how would a plugged vent cause an issue? Just askin' I'm not smart enough to understand.

As for the septic tank it is situated well below the basement floor. We live on a fairly "steep" hillside. I don't think the grade of the septic system is an issue. The percent of grade is high.

Last edited by denjinks; 07-08-2014 at 08:59 PM. Reason: more information
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Old 07-08-2014, 09:40 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denjinks View Post
I think the line "y's" into the main one to the septic tank. I have a theory that one of my grandchildren may have "flushed" something down.

Also how would a plugged vent cause an issue? Just askin' I'm not smart enough to understand.

As for the septic tank it is situated well below the basement floor. We live on a fairly "steep" hillside. I don't think the grade of the septic system is an issue. The percent of grade is high.
Hopefully that's the problem.

A plugged vent would cause an issue because basically you need air behind water for it to move in a dwv system properly. Everything is gravity fed. Also allows sewer gas to be vented out of the home and prevents traps from being siphoned out. It's very important in a dwv system.

Last edited by jmon; 07-08-2014 at 09:53 PM.
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Old 07-08-2014, 10:25 PM   #14
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Basement stool


Bad wax seals are caused by loose or rocking toilets- possible broken flange. This might explain your continual leak after re-setting the toilet.
They can also leak if the drain is backing up and the wax seal was poor to start with.

Slow or poor flushing toilets are usually a blocked trapway in the toilet itself- auger the toilet or pull a rag through the trap since you have pulled the toilet.

If the building drain is partially blocked you may see signs of a backup in the basement shower, tub or floor drain since they are at floor level. I doubt this is the issue since you haven't mentioned other problems.
I'd hold off on the camera charge until you've verified a level floor, sound flange and a clear toilet.
You could even pour a 5 gal bucket of water down the pipe to see how fast the pipe takes it.
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Old 07-09-2014, 07:35 AM   #15
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Basement stool


There is a wash sink next to the toilet and it seems to drain just fine.

I did find that the flange is broken. The part that the stool bolts down to. I don't think it's supposed to be in two pieces? So I think that is probably a good deal of the problem with it leaking. It had never leaked before.

I'm still not sure about how well it's draining? I am going to use a garden hose and see how fast it drains. rotor rooter services are pretty pricey, we may still have to go that route but I'm trying to avoid the cost.

How do you unplug a sewer vent?

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