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Old 10-19-2006, 07:20 AM   #16
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A million thanks to all of you kind people who take the time to respond; Is the "perimeter drain" a very expensive undertaking that requires a contractor to do it, or is it something for DIY's?

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Old 10-19-2006, 08:46 PM   #17
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I'm not sure how much that would cost. I wouldn't diy it. You have to dig put in drainage pipe with holes in the top of it. Then if i'm not mistake they cover it with a type of drainage rock. A type of rock which allows water to get through to the drainage pipe holes.
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Old 10-20-2006, 08:41 AM   #18
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Get several prices from masonry contractors (not waterproofing companies).

It can be a DIY project, but it is a lot of work and a mess while you do it. I did it over a 3 week period by myself and with some help from my 12 year old son's friends. I hired a contractor to make the saw cuts in the floor. The materials (pipe, rock, Quikrete, sump, pump) are not too expensive (under $600 usually).

Depending on you home, a contractor would charge $2000 to $7000 as a guess, unless it is very large or the layout and logistics are tough.

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Old 11-14-2006, 02:05 PM   #19
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It has been almost a month now, since i had desribed my problem with a wet basement, and my question was whether a small sump pit (approx. 14x14 inches), was the problem of getting wetnes where the floor meets the wall when it rains a lot. I got a few answers but my question was never responded to. I don't have a flooding problem, could a 3-feet deep sump pit installation with a good pump and back up system take care of the problem? Can someone strictly respond to my question and let me know the pros and cons......The wetness does not appear until after an hour or so of havy rains. Some of the water comes in by seeping between the first and second row of cinder block and drains into the one inch float that i have, but when the rain is realy heavy, it overfills the float and spils over in the opposite corner of the sump pit, temporarily then it drains back to the sump pit.
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Old 11-14-2006, 03:26 PM   #20
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pilihronis -

Since it has been a month since you last got a response, it it obviuos you will not get a "strict response" from volunteers that cannot see the problem.

Your current system is inadequate as you have been advised. Contact a local, reputable contractor for suggestions if you do not intend to do the work yourself.

Your basement was built in an excavation that has become a swimming pool. With clay, what else can you expect?

Have you done all of the standard, obvious remedial steps like gutters, downspout extensions (10' minimum) and created positive drainage away from the house? - These are the cheapest and most expedient steps.

Your problem is not with the size or depth of the sump. Your sump system is a cheap, inferior replacement for a proper dewatering system for a very common problem. Sometimes it is adequate but it can easily be overwhelmed with a heavy drain. - It does not take a "flooding problem" to cause mold and render a basement useless. You need to collect the water and get rid of it before it gets into your basement.

Reputable builders and good contractors recognize the value of an adequate subsurface dewatering system.

Where I live (even with sandy soil), a good contractor would not not go with just a sump. Some even put in a dual system (both inside and outside the footings because of the low initial cost) because of the value of a usable basement. Unfortunately, low construction/selling cost is one of the reasons these situations happen.

Just contact some locals to help alleviate your moisture problems.

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Old 11-14-2006, 06:19 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron The Plumber View Post
Sounds like the pit is undersized, go with a larger pit install a barrel like seen in the link below.


http://www.dryupbasement.com/newsite/baseboard.html
Looks like I did in fact give you an answer, was this not what you wanted to hear?

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