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Old 08-27-2009, 02:45 PM   #1
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Air Conditioner Condensate Drain


I had a company come out and install an air conditioner approx 5 years ago. The other day, my floor was ALL wet. I noticed that the air conditioner's condensate drain, drains into a hole in my floating slab that then would go to my sump pump to pump out the water. When looking inside the hole, rust remnants were clogging up the hole so it wouldn't drain properly.

The company told me that it wasn't their problem that it leaked, and that skum, buildup and due to the water table, that they weren't at fault. It wasn't my sump pump since at the time it was dry.

Let me know what you think, thanks in advance,
Chase




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Old 08-28-2009, 01:18 AM   #2
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Air Conditioner Condensate Drain


The old drain pipe in the slab is probably cast iron or even worse, galvanized, which is notorious for scaling up with rust and corrosion inside until eventually clogging completely.
See if you can rod or snake out the rust.
Good Luck!
Mike

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Old 08-28-2009, 06:28 AM   #3
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Air Conditioner Condensate Drain


if that is galvinzed buried in the slab it must be rusting away inside with cold condensate running thru it.might consider snaking it out all the way into the sump outlet then take a lenght of clear plastic hose and feed it the lenght of the drain out.then try to radiator clamp it to the exsisting PVC going into the floor.
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Old 08-28-2009, 07:14 AM   #4
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Air Conditioner Condensate Drain


Simplest solution may end up being a condensate pump.
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Old 08-28-2009, 09:43 AM   #5
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Air Conditioner Condensate Drain


There is no pipe, it just drips into the hole
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Old 08-28-2009, 11:36 AM   #6
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Air Conditioner Condensate Drain


Are you telling us that the condensate drains into a hole that is not piped in any way to the place where it ultimately gets pumped out by your sump pump? If so, I can see why the installer said it's not his problem. I wouldn't take responsibility for a drainage system like that either. Unless he was the guy who recommended a drain system like this, in which case I would never use him again. It looks like you have plenty of vertical space, so I'd explore running a dedicated PVC drain from the unit to the sump pit. You need to keep a free air space between the exit of the unit drain and the inlet to the drain pipe, so that any draft inside the unit doesn't pull fumes/odors back through the trap and blow them through the ducting. Air handlers are notorious for growing slime that can clog drains. It may have clogged whatever route the water was taking to get to the pit.
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Old 08-28-2009, 01:29 PM   #7
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Air Conditioner Condensate Drain


Thanks for all your responses

The contract said when he installed the air conditioner that a pump might be needed. He never gave us the option nor did he tell us that the hole was an issue. We wouldn't have cared how expensive the pump was since it was the correct thing to install. So the rust that is in the hole came from the Air Conditioner that he installed.
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Old 08-28-2009, 03:17 PM   #8
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Air Conditioner Condensate Drain


In addition to re-routing the drain, I'd be pulling the side panel off of the unit and inspecting the drain pan and coil supports. Could be a poor galvanizing job and these parts are now corroding away.
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Old 08-28-2009, 07:32 PM   #9
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Air Conditioner Condensate Drain


so with no pipe in the floor it just makes its way to the sump!snake it and pull a clear plastic lenght of tube and connect it and your good to go...pumping it out it still has to make the sump

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