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Old 10-16-2012, 11:25 AM   #1
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Advice on disconnecting a gas stove


My ancient gas stove will have to be disconnected to allow a hardwood floor to be installed in my kitchen. The procedure looks pretty straightforward, but I still thought I should check with users here to see if I'm on the right track.

Attached are two photos. One shows the shut-off valve in the gas pipe between the wall and the stove. The second shows the connection between the gas pipe and the flexible hose connection going to the stove.

If I understand correctly, the procedure is:
  • Pull up on the handle of the shut-off valve, so that the valve shaft is perpendicular with the pipe. This should shut off the gas flow.
  • Use a pipe wrench to disconnect the flexible hose connection.
Question: As the stove will be disconnected for a day or more, should there also be a brass fitting to cap off the pipe where it meets the flexible hose? Or should I have more faith that the shut-off valve will do its job to prevent any gas from escaping?

If a brass fitting is needed, is there a standard size, like 3/8" or 1/2"?

Thanks in advance for any advice. The contractor will have the responsibility of moving the stove, but his specialty is wood, not plumbing, and I'll admit to being wary about anything involving a potential gas leak.
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Advice on disconnecting a gas stove-shutoffvalve.jpg   Advice on disconnecting a gas stove-hoseconnect.jpg  

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Old 10-16-2012, 12:29 PM   #2
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Advice on disconnecting a gas stove


-use 2 crescent wrenches on the flex fittings, one to turn the nut and the other to back wrench.

-pipe wrenches are to be used on pipe and pipe fittings, not fittings that are for crescent wrenches. You'll wreck those fittings if you use a pipe wrench.

-never leave an open gas line. Cap or plug whatever you need to to keep the gas from accidentally being turned on.

-you could cap the flare fitting coming out of the pipe, or plug the end of the flex. It looks like 1/2", but it's hard to tell on my phone. May be easier to plug the black iron 90. Use gas approved dope or tape on the male fitting. Do not use any dope or tape on the flare fittings.

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Old 10-16-2012, 12:49 PM   #3
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Advice on disconnecting a gas stove


may want to verify if you state/local jurisdiction requires a qualified/licensed individual to work on gas lines. I know in my state you are "suppose" to use a licensed pipe fitter for all gas work. what does this mean? if it is required and you do it and there is a problem (such as an explosion) then your insurance company may not cover the damage.

I know, being picky ..... but it's little things like this that can trip one up in life

my humble opinion
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Old 10-16-2012, 09:29 PM   #4
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Advice on disconnecting a gas stove


Thanks to you both for your responses. A couple of follow-ups:

(1) First, I should have written "crescent wrench" rather than "pipe wrench." Sorry.

(2) It sounds like coming out of the pipe I have:
  • a black iron 90 degree elbow
  • a male flare fitting coming out of the black iron 90
  • the female fitting coming out of the flex hose
If I'm correct about that, then the crescent wrenches will likely be used on the male flare fitting and the female hose fitting. A 1/2" cap with dope or tape then can be used to cover the male flare fitting.

Does that sound like a plan? (I hope!)

I also could tell the contractor that I'd just as soon his plumber subcontractor does this part of the job.
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Old 10-16-2012, 09:58 PM   #5
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Advice on disconnecting a gas stove


Just buy a 1/2 and a 3/8 cap so you only make one trip.
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Old 10-16-2012, 10:37 PM   #6
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Advice on disconnecting a gas stove


Quote:
Originally Posted by MidgeTenant
Thanks to you both for your responses. A couple of follow-ups:

(1) First, I should have written "crescent wrench" rather than "pipe wrench." Sorry.

(2) It sounds like coming out of the pipe I have:

[*] a black iron 90 degree elbow[*] a male flare fitting coming out of the black iron 90[*] the female fitting coming out of the flex hose

If I'm correct about that, then the crescent wrenches will likely be used on the male flare fitting and the female hose fitting. A 1/2" cap with dope or tape then can be used to cover the male flare fitting.

Does that sound like a plan? (I hope!)

I also could tell the contractor that I'd just as soon his plumber subcontractor does this part of the job.
As per my previous reply, DO NOT use dope or tape on flare fittings. I should have specified, dope or tape can only be used on male iron pipe, which would be a plug if you decided to plug the black iron 90. Hiring a gas fitter may be the better course of action.
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Old 10-17-2012, 10:19 AM   #7
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Advice on disconnecting a gas stove


Thanks again for the responses. I'm going to ask that the plumbing sub-contractor do it.
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Old 10-18-2012, 05:42 PM   #8
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Advice on disconnecting a gas stove


I talked to the head of the company, and he said he strongly agrees that the plumber should do the job. He said that shut-off valves in older homes like mine can be a bit balky. I think some kind of miscommunication must have occurred between him and the sub.

The moral of the story, at least for me: If I'm working with a specialist to complete a job, and the job requires something on the side that's out of the specialist's field, I might want to hesitate a bit before assuming that the specialist can do it. Especially if safety is an issue, as it was in this case.

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