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Old 06-14-2011, 04:12 PM   #1
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Adding a T in a gas line


I have an 8 foot run of 1in black pipe, and I need to branch out a second gas line. I think what I'm 'supposed' to do is:

- Cut the pipe and remove it
- Re-run it as a section of pipe, the T, another section of pipe, a union, and a third section of pipe.

I was also thinking about:

- Cutting the pipe
- Using a dremel to grind the threads off the 2 sides of the T fitting
- JB Weld'ing the T fitting into place

Guessing the second option isn't up to code, but it seems like it would last forever. It would save about $80 in materials, and have less places to leak -- downside being that it couldn't be disassembled (short of recutting the pipe and using more JB Weld)

Anyone have any advice or another way / tutorial of how to add a T into an existing gas line?

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Old 06-14-2011, 04:19 PM   #2
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Adding a T in a gas line


The suggestion of using JB weld on gas piping will get you alot of responses, this is the reason why there are so many suggestions as to not touch gas piping as a DIY.

The though of using anything else but rated, pipe, threads and dope is just plain stupid.

I don't mean to belittle you, but a suggestion like that in a public forum should be squashed forever.

Call a licensed proffessional, before you build that bomb!

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Old 06-14-2011, 04:26 PM   #3
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Adding a T in a gas line


Tibberous...terrible, terrible idea. Do it right and don't kill yourself or anyone who lives with you.
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Old 06-14-2011, 07:14 PM   #4
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Adding a T in a gas line


Yikes.
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Old 06-14-2011, 08:17 PM   #5
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Adding a T in a gas line


So you don't think it will hold up over time? The reason I suggested JB Weld is because people use it to patch fuel tanks. I'm almost positive a real weld would work, but it'd be harder to weld on a fitting that to replace the whole pipe.

Is the first way I suggested the best 'right' way? It just seems like a lot to add a new gas hookup. A water line would just be two cuts, a fitting and some solder - guess I was hoping there would be a similiar way to do this. The other gas line I'm running is easy, since I can run off an existing pipe - this one I either have to add in a T or double-back like 15 feet.
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Old 06-14-2011, 08:43 PM   #6
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Adding a T in a gas line


Some threads I read here make me laugh. This one scares the $hit out of me!
Don't consider any joining method except those approved by code.
There are some areas that won't even allow a home owner to run gas piping. Are you pulling a permit like any responsible homeowner would? Ask your inspector how to join your gas line
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Old 06-14-2011, 09:34 PM   #7
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Adding a T in a gas line


Permit just to add a couple gas lines? So they can maybe tell me I'm not even allowed to do it? That sounds like a bad idea.

Codes are good as guides, but I think people can get carried away with them. Perfect example - my hot water tank sits on my unfinished basement floor, literally 6 feet away from a floor drain. Before I replaced my old one, it would leak, and the water would pool up and run into the drain. Code says I'm supposed to have a drip pan, but in my case, it would be stupid. Gas is a little different, because there is a safety aspect involved, but just because something isn't 'correct' doesn't necessarily make it unsafe.

Probably will end up taking the pipe apart and reassembling it with the union, just seems a little wasteful to spend an extra $100 if either way will have the same result. Maybe home depot could rethread the end of my old pipe so I wouldn't have to buy a new one? That would save like $60, since the pipe is like $15/ft when you have to get a custom size.
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Old 06-14-2011, 09:40 PM   #8
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Adding a T in a gas line


Here is why there are codes and permits. Are you willing to take the risk?
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Old 06-14-2011, 09:42 PM   #9
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Adding a T in a gas line


Quote:
Originally Posted by tibberous View Post
Permit just to add a couple gas lines? So they can maybe tell me I'm not even allowed to do it? That sounds like a bad idea.
Yes, I fear for you and your family's safety.
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Old 06-14-2011, 10:47 PM   #10
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Adding a T in a gas line


This thread =

It all adds up to



If you want it easy, disassemble it outside the building and add a tee there, and run trac pipe from outside to wherever your fixture is going to be.
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Old 06-14-2011, 10:49 PM   #11
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Adding a T in a gas line


Quote:
Originally Posted by tibberous View Post
Permit just to add a couple gas lines? So they can maybe tell me I'm not even allowed to do it? That sounds like a bad idea.

Codes are good as guides, but I think people can get carried away with them. Perfect example - my hot water tank sits on my unfinished basement floor, literally 6 feet away from a floor drain. Before I replaced my old one, it would leak, and the water would pool up and run into the drain. Code says I'm supposed to have a drip pan, but in my case, it would be stupid. Gas is a little different, because there is a safety aspect involved, but just because something isn't 'correct' doesn't necessarily make it unsafe.

Probably will end up taking the pipe apart and reassembling it with the union, just seems a little wasteful to spend an extra $100 if either way will have the same result. Maybe home depot could rethread the end of my old pipe so I wouldn't have to buy a new one? That would save like $60, since the pipe is like $15/ft when you have to get a custom size.
15 dollars a foot? You are getting hosed.

Go to a plumbing shop and buy a piece and have them thread it. I bet you should be paying somewhere in the realm of 5.00/ft or less.
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Old 06-14-2011, 10:57 PM   #12
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Adding a T in a gas line


Your second option..........is not an option period
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Old 06-15-2011, 12:13 AM   #13
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Adding a T in a gas line


Quote:
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15 dollars a foot? You are getting hosed.

Go to a plumbing shop and buy a piece and have them thread it. I bet you should be paying somewhere in the realm of 5.00/ft or less.
For 1in? I was looking at Home Depot - might have the price wrong.

And the point I was trying to make is that something can be safe and functional without being up to code or done properly. If you welded all the gas lines, it would work and be safe - it just would be really hard to work on, and not the 'proper' way to do it.

If I try to get a permit, and they say I can't do it myself, I could end up paying $1,000+ between the price of a permit and a plumber. Think I'd rather do it myself for $100-200.

Anyway, wasn't trying to start a debate - to be honest I was hoping there was some super-easy third way to do this that I didn't know about. If my house was setup different, it probably wouldn't be as bad -- once I add these three gas lines I'll have 15 total (5 fireplaces, 5 unused spots where stuff used to be... little bit of a rats nest)
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Old 06-15-2011, 12:20 AM   #14
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Adding a T in a gas line


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For 1in? I was looking at Home Depot - might have the price wrong.
Sounds about right there. Should expect to pay 400-500% of what you should be paying.
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Old 06-15-2011, 12:31 AM   #15
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Adding a T in a gas line


I lol'd at this thread everyone says no to welding, but as a ticked gas fitter I can tell you it can be done safely, but to do so will be more expensive. What you need to do is shut the line down then purge it using an inert gas like nitrogen, using a regular air compressor is a no go. After you have purged it you need to keep the inert gas flowing through the pipe while welding it.

Like I said it can be done safely, the other option I would look at is using a product like "TracPipe" or a similar product to run your lines. When you install what ever morbid you choose make sure you test the line to 50 psi for 30 minutes. Your test gauge should be a 60 psi gauge 3" in diameter the reason for this is if you use a 100 or 200 psi gauge you won't know if you have lost 1-2 psi over your test time.

Also what none has mentioned yet is that 1" gas line is sized for what running on it, you could starve your appliaces of gas by hooking up additional items to the line. also that pic looks like the one where the plumber had his b-tank explode in his truck.



In closing yes Gas is very bad to touch, and should be done by a prefessional, some guys may even offer a trade inservices instead if cash payment.

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