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gone_fishing 01-12-2008 10:51 PM

Adding run to gas line???
 
Well, since I can't get a plumber willing to work I am taking on this part of the project myself. I will need to switch a 90 degree elbow to a tee and add a line. I will then likely run flexible hose from there along the joist then through three joists and down the wall to where I will install my dryer. Here are my questions:

1) Does this sounds good?
2) How long can I run flexible hose (I'm in Pennsylvania)
3) How do I disconnect an elbow to start the process?

I am new to plumbing...

Thanks,
Kevin

Marlin 01-12-2008 11:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gone_fishing (Post 87931)
Well, since I can't get a plumber willing to work I am taking on this part of the project myself. I will need to switch a 90 degree elbow to a tee and add a line. I will then likely run flexible hose from there along the joist then through three joists and down the wall to where I will install my dryer. Here are my questions:

1) Does this sounds good?
2) How long can I run flexible hose (I'm in Pennsylvania)
3) How do I disconnect an elbow to start the process?

I am new to plumbing...

Thanks,
Kevin

Gas and threaded pipe is a lousy (difficult) place to start plumbing.
Gas pipe needs to be sized according to how many fixtures using what amount of gas are on the line. So what size is the line you want to tap off of, and what fixtures are already on it?

Given that you can tap off the line you have two options to get that elbow out.
The first is you need to to to the end of the line and un -thread everything before the elbow in order to unthread the elbow.
The other option is to cut the pipe with a sawzall Cut say 4" away from the elbow. This will allow you to remove that length. You then remove and re-thread pipe you sawzalled. Then get a left/right coupling and 4" left right nipple. One half of the coupling and one half of the nipple have reverse threads. Thread the pipe you cut back into place, then thread the coupling on the end of it. Now thread the tee onto the line you didn't cut. Now put the nipple between the tee and the coupling with the reverse threads pointing into the coupling. You can then make it up (be 100% sure both sides catch at the same time). Spinning it one way will tighten both ends.

You can not use flexible pipe unless you are certified to install it, you must use black threaded pipe.


Gas lines are usually a job best left for a professional plumber because of the inherent risk of working on a gas line, the risk of a leak causing injury, death, and/or property damage, liability and insurance issues, and the expense of proper equipment.

Brik 01-13-2008 09:48 PM

Marlin summed it up. I'm in PA too and you cant buy the flex stuff (CSST) here without a license and a certificate of training. Gas can also be run in flex copper but I don't even want to go there. Black pipe can be had at Lowes and HD but will be a real PIA to work with.

So, if you cant get a contractor to do it, or cant afford their rates, where does that leave you? Not sure. I guess call around some more.

Or really do your homework. GasTite (One brand of CSST) and other companies do the cert programs a lot. Maybe sit in on one of those and get a cert and then buy the stuff at the plumbing house and DIY. Or - find another way to buy the flex and really really do your homework on how to DIY. (Search here for my CSST story and the push back I got from some.

Marlin 01-13-2008 10:52 PM

You need a license to buy it but most guys working in the supply houses don't know that and will sell it to you. I would avoid the stuff though, and even using it you're still going to have to change that elbow.

gone_fishing 01-14-2008 07:42 AM

I didn't know you needed a license. I will keep trying to find a plumber to do the work for me. I've called about a dozen so far with only one quote so far.

gone_fishing 01-14-2008 12:47 PM

I was able to get in touch with two plumbers. They are coming out later this week...should have it completed in 2 weeks...

Clutchcargo 01-14-2008 03:04 PM

Hopefully one of them will show up.

gone_fishing 01-14-2008 03:59 PM

Both plumbers have worked on my next door neighbors houses...I also have another guy in the loop. Will call to come over this week.

bigMikeB 01-14-2008 05:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Marlin (Post 87943)
Gas and threaded pipe is a lousy (difficult) place to start plumbing.
Gas pipe needs to be sized according to how many fixtures using what amount of gas are on the line. So what size is the line you want to tap off of, and what fixtures are already on it?

Given that you can tap off the line you have two options to get that elbow out.
The first is you need to to to the end of the line and un -thread everything before the elbow in order to unthread the elbow.
The other option is to cut the pipe with a sawzall Cut say 4" away from the elbow. This will allow you to remove that length. You then remove and re-thread pipe you sawzalled. Then get a left/right coupling and 4" left right nipple. One half of the coupling and one half of the nipple have reverse threads. Thread the pipe you cut back into place, then thread the coupling on the end of it. Now thread the tee onto the line you didn't cut. Now put the nipple between the tee and the coupling with the reverse threads pointing into the coupling. You can then make it up (be 100% sure both sides catch at the same time). Spinning it one way will tighten both ends.

You can not use flexible pipe unless you are certified to install it, you must use black threaded pipe.


Gas lines are usually a job best left for a professional plumber because of the inherent risk of working on a gas line, the risk of a leak causing injury, death, and/or property damage, liability and insurance issues, and the expense of proper equipment.

What the hell is a left right fitting?

Marlin 01-14-2008 05:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bigMikeB (Post 88465)
What the hell is a left right fitting?

It only comes in a coupling. Most threads we use are right hand meaning you turn them clockwise to tighten. Left hand threads you turn counterclockwise to tighten.
One side of the coupling has normal threads, the other side has left hand threads. These typically come with a matching left/right nipple. This allows you to add fitting in line without using a union and without tearing apart the entire line.

bigMikeB 01-15-2008 07:26 AM

Where do you live, what state? I have been doing piping for over 20 years and have never used a fitting like that other than for HB Smith commericial boilers. The supply houses don't stock them here smaller than 2 1/2" thread. If it consists of a coupling and two nipples how is it any better to add than just a union? What brand are they? Is it cheaper or more than a union? Curious.

Marlin 01-15-2008 04:53 PM

I honestly don't know what they cost, I'd imagine about the same as a regular coupling and nipple so the same or a little less than a union. I suppose their is no real advantage to this over a union, which would be used in this case. It just didn't click in my head that it might be easier for him to use a union as I've been taught to do it with these couplings. All it really does is give you a cleaner looking install so you don't have a seemingly random union and it's no harder to use.
I live in NY and the plumbing supply house stocks them.

bigMikeB 01-15-2008 07:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Marlin (Post 88718)
I honestly don't know what they cost, I'd imagine about the same as a regular coupling and nipple so the same or a little less than a union. I suppose their is no real advantage to this over a union, which would be used in this case. It just didn't click in my head that it might be easier for him to use a union as I've been taught to do it with these couplings. All it really does is give you a cleaner looking install so you don't have a seemingly random union and it's no harder to use.
I live in NY and the plumbing supply house stocks them.

What part of NY? I wonder if it's a regional thing?

Marlin 01-15-2008 08:22 PM

Long Island
It defiantly doesn't have to do with codes, that's just the way I do it. I bet if you looked around you could find them.


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