Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Interior Decorating

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-21-2012, 11:04 PM   #16
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 0
Share |
Default

What would you do w/these cabinets?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Iluvitalian View Post
Hi, we just bought our 1st house and our kitchen is very outdated. I would live to tear everything down and start fresh, however it is just not in our budget at this time. So I'm curious as to what some of you would do to make this kitchen come to life? Besides replacing appliances which we will do as soon as we can. Would you paint the cabinets, if so what color? http://m1186.photobucket.com/albums/19yvette88

If that were my kitchen I would surely sand it down and make the wood lighter to brighten up the place.

I always invest in those very toxic chemicals that take off stains, top coats, and all types of things in wood easily, just because I despise how long it takes to use a sander. Those chemicals burn if you get them on your skin, so you have to be cautious. You have to make sure your kitchen is well ventilated before you use the chemical sanders, and plan not to make any food in it until it's aired out properly. But I do that, because I don't like sanding, and it lifts up the wood stains and colours without having to grate at the wood.

I would also think about working with that beautiful floor. I would try to sand down the wood as light as it can go, and pick a wood stain a very similar shade to the floors. Personally I like blending colours like that to make the room appear bigger.

I never paint over wood, I love wood grains too much to do that. I sand down all the wood in my house to be the same colour. (using chemicals to do so)


I absolutely love white countertops, I actually painted over and sealed my own countertops a brilliant bright white. Before they were a speckled design. Though my cupboards were also white, so I painted them a very dark brown, and mixed some of the cupboards with white, so it has a japanese feel to it.
Yet I wouldn't recommend you going with any dark shades, darker browns only work in very well lit surroundings that have very light wall colours.

If you plan on painting in the kitchen, especially countertops, make sure to seal it with a food safe gloss coat. I sealed mine with a very high gloss that was food safe, very shiny, with many coats, and because of that my white countertops never get dirty or stained.

thunderseed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2012, 06:06 AM   #17
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,635
Rewards Points: 0
Default

What would you do w/these cabinets?


Remember some strippers give off fumes that are heavier than air and float along the floor toward pilot lights. They are highly explosive. Use gel strippers if you use chemicals as they are safer. They may take longer.

Use all chemicals only with adequate ventilation.
user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2012, 06:26 AM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 709
Rewards Points: 0
Default

What would you do w/these cabinets?


We do a lot of furniture restoration and refinishing and always use a sander.
The new circular sanders are a lot faster and easier than furniture stripping.
I only use the stripping in the hard to reach places like corners. I apply the
stripper and use steel wool.

Years ago, we refinished our old maple kitchen cabs and we used liquid stripper,
it was a long a tedious job...we have since learned to use a
sander. (and have since put in two new kitchens since then...the most
recent one, we made the cabinets ourselves)
Two Knots is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2012, 07:12 AM   #19
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,635
Rewards Points: 0
Default

What would you do w/these cabinets?


Since they are so outdated, stripping and refinishing them seems an awful lot of work to me unless the new kitchen is to have a retro look? The odds of them matching up with any contemporary appliances are slim too I suspect. A shame since they look like nice cabinetry for their day.

If you must strip? Your goal should be to keep as much threat of the finish melting into the grain as possible. I was always surprised how much paint and varnish I could get off with a SHARP scraper.

Both chemical and mechanical methods---like sanding---can force melted materials down into the grain. I usually did what I could with them, then put a coat of shellac on to stick to melted finish in the grain, then used a lighter liquid stripper to pull it and the shellac off.

Last tool I bought when still working was an infrared stripper. It was a gift from God. I used it extensively on exterior siding and interior trim and it worked beyond fast---heating only paint layers. I see no reason it would not take at least the clear varnish off kitchen cabinets. The tool is expensive but you can rent them. Know there are waiting lists though.
user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2012, 01:38 AM   #20
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 8
Rewards Points: 0
Default

What would you do w/these cabinets?


I think changing out the hardware will indeed do wonders. Staining is a solid option. I love wood grain, but some wood looks dated, like oak. I don't know what your cabinets are made of, but their finish and hardware (and that scroll trim) all contribute to them looking quite dated; two of those three things are easy to fix. On the other hand, you could get mouthy with your kitchen and paint the cabinets one color and the doors another. Or, better yet, the doors a few different colors. Slap terrible design in the face with indignant rebellion. Say, gray cabinets, with doors that are red, orange, and lighter gray. I actually think that might look cool with your counter tops (I think? Are they solid white?) and I love that color combination, but it would depend on the rest of the space.

Syd
hardtimesdesign is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2012, 10:08 AM   #21
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 82
Rewards Points: 0
Default

What would you do w/these cabinets?


I'd remove scroll trim and change pulls. If you still don't like it, sand and stain. Don't paint solid wood.

You can also change doors and panels but keep base (refacing). Lowe's and HD do that but my nephew, who does refacin for one of them says people spend so much money with the 2 big companies doing that, that he could build them a custom kitchen. He said it would be cheaper to go to a small cabinet shop whose been in business for a long time and get them to reface.

Just an FYI in case you decide to do this, I've recently looked for cabinets and asked about trends. Glazing and dark colors are going out per one upscale shop.
canoes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2012, 01:37 PM   #22
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 709
Rewards Points: 0
Default

What would you do w/these cabinets?


Ya know, things constantly change. Things go out and then back in.
When we did our kitchen five years ago, I wanted shaker/arts and crafts style cabinets.
The head cabinet maker wanted to make raised paneled doors, but
I convenienced him that Shaker cabs with it's plain lines was elegant. He loves them as much as I do.
I figured they were around hundreds of years ago, so
they wouldn't be out dated any time soon...Not that that bothered me either,
as we have many family antiques that have been around for a very long time.
So really, try not to go with the current fads, but get what you like when
choosing cabinets.
Two Knots is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2012, 01:25 PM   #23
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 17
Rewards Points: 0
Default

What would you do w/these cabinets?


I would saw off the scroll straight, use tsp cleaner (removes grime and prepares for paint) remove doors and pulls, prime with kilz, Pittsburgh grand distinction paint for cabinets. The secret to the best finish is a foam roller, use for both primer and paint. Preferably 2 coats. If you can afford new hinges or pulls spray paint and spray with lacquer. Mine look great, did them in the color called Tall Grass with black hinges and pulls three years ago. Still love them.
jojoroberts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2012, 01:29 PM   #24
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 17
Rewards Points: 0
Default

What would you do w/these cabinets?


Another idea is to add strips of wood along the outside of the doors like a shaker mission style, seen it on a blog, your doors would work well for this
jojoroberts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2012, 12:49 PM   #25
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 221
Rewards Points: 0
Default

What would you do w/these cabinets?


My parents had cabinets with scroll work and flat doors like yours. The cabinets were built-in place in 1964, solid color matched (no dark streaks) hickory.
For 40 years all my parents did was brighten the lighting, put up light colored country motif wallpaper and scrub the cabinets with TSP every year. Your cabinets are a little darker, so you might want to paint them. The trick to create a look that says these cabinets belong here. Wallpaper maybe passe, but it is cheaper than new tile and counters. You could also stencil the walls and scroll work.
May I also suggest stopping by your local used book store and looking through the old Sunset, BH&G or similar kitchen remodelling books. I remember seeing issues from the 70's and early 80's with scroll work cabinets.
goosebarry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2012, 06:55 PM   #26
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 38
Rewards Points: 0
Default

What would you do w/these cabinets?


If you decide to keep the wood on the cabinets, you have to sand them to bare wood. Check the sides of the doors to make sure they are solid wood and not veneered. If they are venerred, just lightly sand after throughly cleaning, wipe down with a tack cloth, then PRIME and paint them whatever color you like.
When I sand to bare wood, I use a wood conditioner before applying stain and poly to hydrate the wood. I would use oil based products for staining and varnishing, as they keep a wet edge longer. You can add mineral spirits to your oil based poly to decrease streaking. If the VOC on your oil based poly is 350 or less, you need to add 25-30% of mineral spirits. It's a long story, so trust me on that. Give the stain hours to dry. Make sure the color is even, and if not, touch up and wait. Sometimes, some parts of the wood will absorb more stain than other parts. You probably won't have this problem if you conditioned. In a pinch, you can always hydrate them before staining with water instead of conditioner, but keep in mind that raises the grain so wait at least 4-6 hours after doing so, then stain, wait, check, and apply poly as suggested. Once it is stained and before beginning poly, wipe again to remove any fine dust particles for a more professional look. Wait about 8 hours, apply second coat, 8 hours again, apply 3rd. Give at leat 24-48 before attaching hardware and rehanging.Don't wipe them down for at leat at week for proper adhesion.When applying poly, you can use a roller for a flat surface. Take them off, of course, remove the hardware, and lay them down in a well ventulated area. Don't over brush or roll or you will have streaks. Keep a wet edge while doing so. 3 lite coats are better than 2 thicker ones. If you take your time and do this right, they will look great.
After sanding, remeber to wipe down with a tack cloth( which is actually a cheesecloth with poly on it)to remove any dust before you apply stain.Wipe again before applying poly. DON'T put a fan or anything on them while drying!! You will help dust attach to them. Poly is a magnet for dust particles as it is, so avoid any movement in the drying area as much as possible. If you see any dust after your coat of poly has dried, you can use eithe 220 grit sandpaper or very fine steel wool between coats. Wipe with tack cloth before another application of poly. I prefer the steel wool myself. I think it adds a nicer luster and smoother finish myself. It will " dull" it a bit when you first steel wool it, but that is normal. Just wipe with the tack cloth, and keep going. Just watch your edges so you don't hace drips on the sides. Once they are hung, if you sanded the inside as well, you can do it while mounted if you like.Stain all sides before starting this project if you intend to do the insides as well. THis way, it has a nice finished egde under your hindge where it may show.
I have redone so many cabinets and furniture pieces I lost count.This is a tried and true method. Good luck!!!

Janetp is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Kitchen cabinets - Are Ikea cabinets good? What other mfgs have you used? whataboutj Kitchen & Bath Remodeling 24 11-09-2012 06:14 PM
How Hard is it to Modify RTA Cabinets? mystic_cobra Carpentry 16 03-07-2012 08:53 AM
Refinishing old Cabinets ryanb4614 Carpentry 4 08-18-2011 06:24 PM
How are the premade HD and Lowes Cabinets? twilightcall Carpentry 10 05-25-2008 10:23 AM
My Kitchen Floor-Problems!!! Please Help!!! Fat b Flooring 3 01-25-2007 03:21 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.