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Old 04-05-2012, 02:02 PM   #16
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Need help in re-designing tiny 1920's kitchen!


Nope. Straight back, behind that back wall, is the laundry room; it opens up into a hallway. I plan on sealing off that entry, and putting a door with frosted glass on that back wall, making the laundry room into a laundry/pantry room with under cabinet washer/dryers and wall cabinets/shelves...

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Old 04-05-2012, 05:01 PM   #17
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Need help in re-designing tiny 1920's kitchen!


You might want to look at my thread on renovating our kitchen/dining/living area. We opened up a load bearing wall between our kitchen and dining room to turn it into a bigger airier space. I'm still doing a ton of finishing touches, but it was well worth it.

When you remove/modify a load bearing wall, you need a structural engineer to design a plan. They come in, determine what the wall is supporting in terms of load from the upper floors, what is supporting it beneath, and what you need to do in order to distribute the load over the new wider opening. They give these drawings to an architect who in turn creates suitable plans that you can get a permit with.

If you take out the wall you'll need to support the opening with a new beam, either steel or what is called "engineered wood" This can hidden in a soffit or in some way integrated into the design. Each end of the opening will have a post strong enough to take half the load on the beam, and these posts in turn need to be properly supported underneath, which can potentially mean a new footing in the basement and a steel post directly underneath.

It all sounds terribly complicated but it is not. You build temporary support walls on either side, demo the wall itself, install your new beam and supports, then take down the temp walls and you are done.

When I opened up our wall the only surprise was a couple of radiator supply and return pipes going to the radiator in the bedroom above. Took a plumber a few hours to reroute them.

As far as planning your kitchen goes, I highly recommend 1) using the IKEA kitchen planning tool on their website, and 2) going over to www.ikeafans.com and posting in the forums there, even if you are not considering IKEA stuff at all. Kitchen design is kitchen design no matter what cabinets you use, and the tool is very useful and the people at that forum are super knowledgeable about designing kitchens.
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Old 04-06-2012, 09:36 AM   #18
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Need help in re-designing tiny 1920's kitchen!


Ironlight, you did an amazing renovation on your cradtsman home.
The kitchen is gorgeous as well as everything else. I would love
to see more pic's of your home. I admire your careful attention to detail.

I was going to suggest to Pisces to make a wall of windows on the
back wall to let in the light. She could look at your kitchen photos
for inspiration.

Pisces, When you open the wall between the rooms, it will totally
change everything as far as planning a new kitchen,
I have a galley kitchen so I can appreciate your situation.
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Old 04-06-2012, 10:40 AM   #19
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Need help in re-designing tiny 1920's kitchen!


Thanks. I finally finished the backsplash in the kitchen last week, and now need to get to work on the built in bookcases that will line the long wall in the adjoining "family room".

I want to put in another plug for removing walls in old houses. It makes a huge difference in how the space works and how you live in the house. Yes, the cost of the engineer and architect is perhaps more than you want to pay, but opening the house up can also add significantly to it's value and gives you much more flexibility in designing the kitchen itself. I would definitely do it all over again, although I might not do it myself! Or at least I would hire people for certain parts of it...like the drywalling and painting.
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Old 04-07-2012, 07:15 AM   #20
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Need help in re-designing tiny 1920's kitchen!


I agree Ironlight with removing walls to open spaces.
We took a load of walls down in our house, well worth it.
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Old 04-23-2012, 02:17 AM   #21
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Need help in re-designing tiny 1920's kitchen!


Sorry, but I've been re-doing my hardwoods
the town I live in has a guy in the building departent that you take your plans to and if he likes what he sees it;s approved. If he doesn't he'll tell you want he wants to see most likely to get it approved.They come and check step by step to make sure it's done correctly and that's why you pay for permits, but we made a pony -or half wall- on a bearing wall in another house. It was a long time ago, but we rented jacks that supported the wall on either side while we removed the wall, and My hubby made braces out of 2x4's to support as well while we got a steel beam up there and secured it. THe braces he made were like a rectangle going from the ceiling to floor, with 3 or 4 pieces of 2x4's in the middle to make it sturdy. His buddy secured the beam, so I can't tell you that, but I know we coved it with oak and stained it and it looked nice.Once it was up and secured, they removed the jacks and the 2x4 support. THe roof never fell, and no cracks occurred our plaster walls either. Where there's a will.......
Don't let some of the comments you've had get you down.People take some of the shows too seriously. It's a friggin' tv show, so of couse they are going to look like models. Who cares, really. Personally, I have a friend like that. She looks like she's ready to go on a date and she's cleaning the garage or doing gardening. God bless her!! I look like a slob when I do these kinds of things, as I think most of us do. Different strokes. If we were all the same, it would be a pretty BORING world. As far as hiring an artitect or designer, let's just say my goose died so there are no golden eggs for me to cash in anymore. If your goose died as well, do the best you can with what you have.
When we first bought this place the kitchen made your's look like a palace!! I had nasty tiles as a back splash, with many missing. You know what I did?? First, I cleaned the hell out of them. I bought some grout and gently leveled out the lines after sanding them a bit so the grout would stick. I found a nice roll of vinyl wallpaper...yes, wall paper.... and I covered it the lengthwise, so chose a pattern that works that way if you try this. I was lucky and I didn't have to seam it as it was about an inch wider than what I needed. Most wallpapers are 21 inches wide. I caulked it where it met the counter top and it lasted me for 6 years til I finally had the money to change it all out the way I wanted it to be. My hubby bought a piece of plexiglass and we put it on the portion by the stove where you are most likely to get grease.
I liked it so much i bought 2 more rolls and a chair rail to divide my wall up and did the bottom half of the kitchen in the same pattern.
Is it possible to move the fridge? Maybe to the back , like where your pots are hanging, but facing you? You could maybe put in a lazy susan in the corner and have your counter go around and meet into the straight portion of your counter. I was counting tiles on your floor to see if you could possible have enough space for that, but you can measure. I helped my friend lay granite pieces that were 12x12 as her countertops. She used black. We kept her existing counter and just removed the laminate on the top. It was a pain to do, but then we cleaned with a solution made for removing glue, and laid the black granite, leaving just a tiny space between so there would be hardly any grout line. We purchased a black epoxy grout and it looks amazing. I have a wet saw, so we were able to keep the cost down by not renting one. She used small black mosiacs for the edges and it looks really good.We put the side portions, the edges if you will, on first. This way when we started with the larger top pieces, we could make sure it lined up to look like one cohesive piece. Her cabinets are white, and we laid a black and white vinyl floor and it looks pretty damm cute with her orange excessories.
I'm not a pro, but I have been a DYIer for as long as I can remember. I have made cutains from sheets, hand painted things onto shelves, picture frames and walls. I have hung cabinets, laid every kind of flooring known to man, refinished a LOT of furniture pieces and hung, bed and taped drywall, painted way too many times and refinished hardwood floors now and in the past as well. I converted an old stereo cabinet into a sink in one of my bathrooms. I made my pot racks over my island by using those chrome/metal racks you buy as a cart, and running chains through the part that the leg would normally go and using a wood dolls head ( it's a round ball of wood) and screwing it with the hook so the the chain could fasten once attached and hung from hooks in our now contemporary kitchen.. Before that, my country looking looking had old wood cutting boards . It's nice because I put the screws where I wanted them. The only thing I don't do is electric and plumbing. Hubby is an electrician and we are lucky to have a dear friend for a plumber.Some of my projects have been fantastic, some not. The thing is you try til you do get it right. Take your time. Patience IS really a virtue!
I have a few friends and family members with houses that mine would fit in. Twice. Every last one has always told me that my house is uniqely my own, and they must like my "stamp", as they ask me for suggestions or a helping hand all the time. My 3 daughters all own, and it made me proud that they not only came to me for opinions on projects, but asked for my help and guidance as well.
Our granite is solid, no seams, as the slab we chose from a local vendor was large enough to the the counter this about 10 ft long, with a corner that extends about 6 ft the other way. No seams. My island is 4x6, and the piece on the other side of my stove is 24'2 ft x2 1/2 feet. It ALL cost me $1,540. If you look around your area, you can find a good deal as well if you want a whole piece. I cut on it, and it is WONDERFUL! not a scratch or blemish. I found them on the intenet. THat price included the cost of thier measuring and installing as well.
In the end, it doesn't matter if any body else likes it but you. Our home is a reflection of who we are, just like our friends. And you know what? They ALL have flaws. I however, prefer to call it character!!!
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Old 04-30-2012, 04:25 PM   #22
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Need help in re-designing tiny 1920's kitchen!


No worries. I'm still in the middle of adding lighting to my dining room...
As far as the fridge goes...no it can't be moved to the back -- it's where my back door/access to back yard is, so that's gotta stay open. I definitely like the idea of using a solid slab of granite for the countertops, though, since I just have such a small space to cover.

I'm looking for an island online where I can put where the red pantry currently is. I want it to have a butcher board top, pullout drawer for silverware, and a trashcan space underneath. I think widening the doorway between the dining/kitchen will help to make the kitchen bigger, as well as taking out the free standing pantry.

Do all fridges have the same depth? I want to cut the entryway to be level with the fridge, I think. Then make custom cabs right next to the fridge to the ceiling for more storage space.

The other option would be to put a floor to ceiling pantry cabinet where the current one is, but since the chimney is there, I'd lose depth. In that case, I'd move the butcher block to the other side of the fridge, where the basement door is now, and make the wall adjoining the dining room a half wall. The other downside is that there is a danger of juices/food flying from the chopping block into the dining room...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Janetp View Post
Sorry, but I've been re-doing my hardwoods
the town I live in has a guy in the building departent that you take your plans to and if he likes what he sees it;s approved. If he doesn't he'll tell you want he wants to see most likely to get it approved.They come and check step by step to make sure it's done correctly and that's why you pay for permits, but we made a pony -or half wall- on a bearing wall in another house. It was a long time ago, but we rented jacks that supported the wall on either side while we removed the wall, and My hubby made braces out of 2x4's to support as well while we got a steel beam up there and secured it. THe braces he made were like a rectangle going from the ceiling to floor, with 3 or 4 pieces of 2x4's in the middle to make it sturdy. His buddy secured the beam, so I can't tell you that, but I know we coved it with oak and stained it and it looked nice.Once it was up and secured, they removed the jacks and the 2x4 support. THe roof never fell, and no cracks occurred our plaster walls either. Where there's a will.......
Don't let some of the comments you've had get you down.People take some of the shows too seriously. It's a friggin' tv show, so of couse they are going to look like models. Who cares, really. Personally, I have a friend like that. She looks like she's ready to go on a date and she's cleaning the garage or doing gardening. God bless her!! I look like a slob when I do these kinds of things, as I think most of us do. Different strokes. If we were all the same, it would be a pretty BORING world. As far as hiring an artitect or designer, let's just say my goose died so there are no golden eggs for me to cash in anymore. If your goose died as well, do the best you can with what you have.
When we first bought this place the kitchen made your's look like a palace!! I had nasty tiles as a back splash, with many missing. You know what I did?? First, I cleaned the hell out of them. I bought some grout and gently leveled out the lines after sanding them a bit so the grout would stick. I found a nice roll of vinyl wallpaper...yes, wall paper.... and I covered it the lengthwise, so chose a pattern that works that way if you try this. I was lucky and I didn't have to seam it as it was about an inch wider than what I needed. Most wallpapers are 21 inches wide. I caulked it where it met the counter top and it lasted me for 6 years til I finally had the money to change it all out the way I wanted it to be. My hubby bought a piece of plexiglass and we put it on the portion by the stove where you are most likely to get grease.
I liked it so much i bought 2 more rolls and a chair rail to divide my wall up and did the bottom half of the kitchen in the same pattern.
Is it possible to move the fridge? Maybe to the back , like where your pots are hanging, but facing you? You could maybe put in a lazy susan in the corner and have your counter go around and meet into the straight portion of your counter. I was counting tiles on your floor to see if you could possible have enough space for that, but you can measure. I helped my friend lay granite pieces that were 12x12 as her countertops. She used black. We kept her existing counter and just removed the laminate on the top. It was a pain to do, but then we cleaned with a solution made for removing glue, and laid the black granite, leaving just a tiny space between so there would be hardly any grout line. We purchased a black epoxy grout and it looks amazing. I have a wet saw, so we were able to keep the cost down by not renting one. She used small black mosiacs for the edges and it looks really good.We put the side portions, the edges if you will, on first. This way when we started with the larger top pieces, we could make sure it lined up to look like one cohesive piece. Her cabinets are white, and we laid a black and white vinyl floor and it looks pretty damm cute with her orange excessories.
I'm not a pro, but I have been a DYIer for as long as I can remember. I have made cutains from sheets, hand painted things onto shelves, picture frames and walls. I have hung cabinets, laid every kind of flooring known to man, refinished a LOT of furniture pieces and hung, bed and taped drywall, painted way too many times and refinished hardwood floors now and in the past as well. I converted an old stereo cabinet into a sink in one of my bathrooms. I made my pot racks over my island by using those chrome/metal racks you buy as a cart, and running chains through the part that the leg would normally go and using a wood dolls head ( it's a round ball of wood) and screwing it with the hook so the the chain could fasten once attached and hung from hooks in our now contemporary kitchen.. Before that, my country looking looking had old wood cutting boards . It's nice because I put the screws where I wanted them. The only thing I don't do is electric and plumbing. Hubby is an electrician and we are lucky to have a dear friend for a plumber.Some of my projects have been fantastic, some not. The thing is you try til you do get it right. Take your time. Patience IS really a virtue!
I have a few friends and family members with houses that mine would fit in. Twice. Every last one has always told me that my house is uniqely my own, and they must like my "stamp", as they ask me for suggestions or a helping hand all the time. My 3 daughters all own, and it made me proud that they not only came to me for opinions on projects, but asked for my help and guidance as well.
Our granite is solid, no seams, as the slab we chose from a local vendor was large enough to the the counter this about 10 ft long, with a corner that extends about 6 ft the other way. No seams. My island is 4x6, and the piece on the other side of my stove is 24'2 ft x2 1/2 feet. It ALL cost me $1,540. If you look around your area, you can find a good deal as well if you want a whole piece. I cut on it, and it is WONDERFUL! not a scratch or blemish. I found them on the intenet. THat price included the cost of thier measuring and installing as well.
In the end, it doesn't matter if any body else likes it but you. Our home is a reflection of who we are, just like our friends. And you know what? They ALL have flaws. I however, prefer to call it character!!!

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