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-   -   What type of Hardwood Flooring for Concrete Slab? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/what-type-hardwood-flooring-concrete-slab-62376/)

talk show host 01-20-2010 02:46 PM

What type of Hardwood Flooring for Concrete Slab?
 
Hi all.

First of all, I would like to apologize for asking a question about a project that I will not be doing myself. I do smaller house projects myself, but i simply have no experience with hardwood flooring and my wife would kill me if I screwed this up...

We live in a split-level house in NC and want to put some type of hardwood flooring downstairs. The house is on a slab, so we are debating whether or not to glue down hardwoods or have "lock and fold" hardwoods installed. I know one advantage of the later option would be that they would be installed on a floating floor and we wouldnt have to worry about the boards seperating like the hardwoods in the upstairs of our house. There is also an area of the slab that has cracked and is not entirely level, and we would need to replace the flooring in that area periodically over time.

one contractor that i spoke with was really pushing glue-down flooring, but I wonder if he is doing so because:

1) installation fees will be more expensive and
2) we'd need repair work done periodically in the section of the floor where the slab is cracked - meaning repeat business for him.

if you guys could offer any suggestions on what direction i should go, i would greatly appreciate it.

thanks!

pinwheel45 01-20-2010 06:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by talk show host (Post 386266)
Hi all.

First of all, I would like to apologize for asking a question about a project that I will not be doing myself. I do smaller house projects myself, but i simply have no experience with hardwood flooring and my wife would kill me if I screwed this up...

We live in a split-level house in NC and want to put some type of hardwood flooring downstairs. The house is on a slab, so we are debating whether or not to glue down hardwoods or have "lock and fold" hardwoods installed. I know one advantage of the later option would be that they would be installed on a floating floor and we wouldnt have to worry about the boards seperating like the hardwoods in the upstairs of our house. There is also an area of the slab that has cracked and is not entirely level, and we would need to replace the flooring in that area periodically over time.

one contractor that i spoke with was really pushing glue-down flooring, but I wonder if he is doing so because:

1) installation fees will be more expensive and
2) we'd need repair work done periodically in the section of the floor where the slab is cracked - meaning repeat business for him.

if you guys could offer any suggestions on what direction i should go, i would greatly appreciate it.

thanks!


Engineered floating floor below grade. Be sure to use a high quality moisture barrier.

just tile 01-20-2010 08:01 PM

i dont know why any wood installer would rather glue instead of float a floor. like pinwheel said use a good moisture barrier. and i would use a top of the line pad also. it will help keep your floor from sounding as hollow. good luck.

talk show host 01-21-2010 08:51 AM

thanks for the suggestions and advice. you both confirmed what I was already thinking. thanks!

ssnyder 01-21-2010 03:19 PM

hardwood not a good choice for basements
 
Basements have unique issues due to moisture. Hardwood is not recommended because of potential damage from slab moisture or high humidity conditions.

if you like the hardwood look try Engineered hardwood. It is recommended because it offers beauty and long life. Special care must be used to prevent damage from pooling water. or try Laminate because of good resistance to moisture, stain resistant, dent and scratch resistant.

Many vinyls look like hardwood. Armstrong has a new product, Luxe plank that is vinyl, but is shaped like a plank and looks like wood.

talk show host 01-22-2010 09:37 AM

the way the house positioned, only one side of the room has a portion of a wall below-grade and that wall is approximately 2 feet below grade. the other three sides of the room are above ground, so i do not think moisture will be as much of an issue. my main concern is the slab is cracked in an area, so i'll need to make sure it is sealed and smoothed over.


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