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Old 10-11-2008, 02:58 PM   #1
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What species of wood? Easily available?


I'm trying to determine what the floor type is in a 1926 home in North Dakota. I'm several hours away from the home so I had to dig up some old photos I had that sadly aren't focused directly on the floor (so ignore the cat and the product box )

Any thoughts?




Based on what you think it is, is it easy to find more of the wood from that era to patch up areas that were cut up in a past apartment conversion?

Thanks!

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Old 10-11-2008, 05:48 PM   #2
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What species of wood? Easily available?


Looks like it's possibly a braz cherry.
But patching hardwood is a finiky thing. (like your cat)
Color changes from time and the fact that trees can have different colors may make this project a difficult one.

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Old 10-11-2008, 08:50 PM   #3
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What species of wood? Easily available?


Or CVG pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas Fir) indigenous to the regions of the northern plains and northern coast. Very popular flooring in the upper midwest in days of old.

Need better pictures.
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Old 10-11-2008, 08:57 PM   #4
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Or CVG pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas Fir) indigenous to the regions of the northern plains and northern coast. Very popular flooring in the upper midwest in days of old.

Need better pictures.
Yeah, from asking around, it sounds like it is Douglas Fir. Now to find some...
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Old 10-11-2008, 09:27 PM   #5
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What species of wood? Easily available?


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Yeah, from asking around, it sounds like it is Douglas Fir. Now to find some...
Oh, you can find it. First you have to fill out a credit app.....

Back when I was a timber faller I used to cut millions of board feet of CVG Doug Fir. I have a nice picture of me on an 8 foot stump with my Stihl 084 and a 6 foot bar. I had to cut the butt log at 8 feet cause the yarder couldn't pull it up the hill.

The unit was a small wood sale and most of the trees were around 2-3 feet and this was just an odd ball. They had a small yarder in there and it was all they could do to get that up the hill.
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Old 10-11-2008, 09:35 PM   #6
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What species of wood? Easily available?


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Oh, you can find it. First you have to fill out a credit app.....
Really? What am I looking at per foot for 3-4" boards? I don't expect to need a whole lot, but it depends on what else I discover as the kitchen comes out.

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Back when I was a timber faller I used to cut millions of board feet of CVG Doug Fir. I have a nice picture of me on an 8 foot stump with my Stihl 084 and a 6 foot bar. I had to cut the butt log at 8 feet cause the yarder couldn't pull it up the hill.

The unit was a small wood sale and most of the trees were around 2-3 feet and this was just an odd ball. They had a small yarder in there and it was all they could do to get that up the hill.
That job has always reminded me what real work is... (I'm a software engineer...)
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Old 10-11-2008, 10:49 PM   #7
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What species of wood? Easily available?


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Really? What am I looking at per foot for 3-4" boards? I don't expect to need a whole lot, but it depends on what else I discover as the kitchen comes out.
Don't you read the papers? We are having a rash of CVG thieves here in Oregon. They break into your house with guns drawn and make you tear up your floor for all the CVG. Where have you been?

Going rate around here is $3-4 per lineal foot for the old stuff. Some is going for higher.

Older homes that are going to be torn down are sold for the scrap and a lot of times the owners can get enough out of it to pay for the demo.

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That job has always reminded me what real work is... (I'm a software engineer...)
It is very hard work and I was in really good shape when I was doing it. Running up and down the hills with my saw, gas, oil, lunch, fire equipment, and first aid kept me in excellent shape.

But it was, and is, dangerous. The last year I did it I had 3 friends killed including my boss. They looked for my boss for 2 days till they found him 2 feet in the ground. He had a top of the tree break out and it hit him like a pile driver.

I also have over 500 stitches that keeps me together. The worst was the rooking I was teaching who hit me in the lower leg with his say and cut into my tibia so far I had bone marrow coming out. That was 99 stitches on that one.

But I learned a lot about wood and it has really helped me in doing my remodels. Here are some pictures of my last timber falling project.

http://www.diychatroom.com/members/marvin-gardens-34999/albums/falling-timber-putting-mill-building-addition/
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Old 10-11-2008, 10:50 PM   #8
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What species of wood? Easily available?


I agree it is probably Fir flooring. It used to be economical...These days it isn't.

Looks like your cat is trying to make a case for the reduction of the maximum allowable 4" gap between ballusters allowed by code. The rest of him definately won't fit through.
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Old 10-11-2008, 11:05 PM   #9
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I also have over 500 stitches that keeps me together. The worst was the rooking I was teaching who hit me in the lower leg with his say and cut into my tibia so far I had bone marrow coming out. That was 99 stitches on that one.

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