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Old 02-06-2012, 08:35 AM   #31
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Wet Floor Joists


Daniel:
I did end up calling ServPro back out to have the floor joists dryed. They "tented" the subfloor and put a dehumidifier and three fans in the kitchen. They treated all the joists with something that smells like a hospital. They should be coming later this afternoon to remove their equipment once again. They have told me that there were only a few places that had mold. I know the joists look really bad from the picture but they were really wet. I plan on replacing the subfloor with 3/4" plywood because i only have to replace (2) sheets and the price difference would not be that much and they will be under the sink and dishwasher mainly so if i ever have a leak in the future maybe the plywood will hold up a little better than the OSB. After i get the subfloor down i plan on laying cement backer board becuase we are going to go back with tile instead of vinyl. I just wanted to make sure the joists were completely dry before putting down the subfloor.

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Old 02-08-2012, 08:45 AM   #32
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Daniel:
I did end up calling ServPro back out to have the floor joists dryed. They "tented" the subfloor and put a dehumidifier and three fans in the kitchen. They treated all the joists with something that smells like a hospital. They should be coming later this afternoon to remove their equipment once again. They have told me that there were only a few places that had mold. I know the joists look really bad from the picture but they were really wet. I plan on replacing the subfloor with 3/4" plywood because i only have to replace (2) sheets and the price difference would not be that much and they will be under the sink and dishwasher mainly so if i ever have a leak in the future maybe the plywood will hold up a little better than the OSB. After i get the subfloor down i plan on laying cement backer board becuase we are going to go back with tile instead of vinyl. I just wanted to make sure the joists were completely dry before putting down the subfloor.
I am happy you got the mold problem solved. And plywood is definitely the way to go. I would get exterior grade plywood and stainless steel fasteners though so you do not have the same problem in the future. Best of luck to you in fixing this

Last edited by jasin; 02-08-2012 at 08:49 AM.
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Old 02-08-2012, 08:59 AM   #33
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I know it's after the fact, but there are dishwasher drip trays available. They divert the water to the front of the machine so any leak is visible before they create a problem. You may want to consider that after what you have been through. You mentioned tile...perhaps you can build a "curb" around the dishwasher to create the same effect. At any rate, best of luck.
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Old 02-08-2012, 01:42 PM   #34
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Missouri:

I will be building a curb this time.
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Old 02-08-2012, 01:53 PM   #35
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Well, i put down the two new sheets of plywood subfloor. It looks great, but the problem is where the old 3/4" OSB meets my new 3/4" (23/32) plywood there is a slight variation. the new subfloor sits between 1/32 - 1/16" lower than the old OSB subfloor. The final product for this floor is going to be ceramic tile so I want to ensure that the floor is completely "flat". I am not sure how much variation I can have but I will be placing 1/4" cement backer board down prior to the tile. I have read about leveling low spots with asphalt shingles. Should i just put the backer board down and disregard the small deviation or should i place asphalt shingles to level the subfloor before placing the cement backer board?
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Old 02-09-2012, 03:38 AM   #36
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I know it's after the fact, but there are dishwasher drip trays available. They divert the water to the front of the machine so any leak is visible before they create a problem.
Those are always a good idea!.
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Old 02-09-2012, 03:43 AM   #37
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Well, i put down the two new sheets of plywood subfloor. It looks great, but the problem is where the old 3/4" OSB meets my new 3/4" (23/32) plywood there is a slight variation. the new subfloor sits between 1/32 - 1/16" lower than the old OSB subfloor.
Lots of things can cause that. One that I can think of off hand is the fact that with age, incorrect installation, and moisture exposure osb will sag, dip, dimple, etc. stuff like that. It does not hold up as well as regular plywood. They've supposedly fixed a lot of this with the newer osb, but I still advice against using it. My advice too, is inline with The National Tile Contractors Association recommendations of not using OSB for sub-floor.

Last edited by jasin; 02-09-2012 at 04:12 AM.
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Old 11-14-2012, 07:58 AM   #38
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The National Tile Contractors Association recommends that OSB NOT be used as subfloor.
Of course they would say that, as any person knows the best subfloor for tile is backerboard, which also happens to be made by a lot of companies that also make tile and/or help fund said association... Much like oil companies telling you to change oil every 3k miles even tho 5k is max performing and most oil can go well above even that.

2 you are mistaken by thinking you could tell him everything that is wrong by simply looking at his picture, this how drastic mistakes are made, you have not seen it on-site but presume your word to be golden. Did he have a straight-edge and level on each joist, and measure to a constant the distance from the top/bottom to said constant? Well the picture has expired but my guess would be no.

3. Most houses now a days are being built with all or paritally constructed parts that consist of osb or particleboard, because these variations are much stronger than simple plywood and hold up better to moisture, always verify explicitly why something is worse or better than the other.

4. Bleach is more than enough to kill surface mold, in fact most "mold-killing" products out there use bleach but call it by the chemical formula-s in order to trick you into paying more for something costs merely a couple bucks, but, it is not the chemical so much as how it is applied, and used. spraying and leaving it at that will not perform nearly as well as soaking it, and also providing fans and a dehumidifier. The other chemicals listed will simply do it faster.

And lastly since you saw good reason to argue with everyone as to why u use plywood over osb, all i ask is you keep on using that plywood so we can continue making a living off of contractors whom build with substandard materials. Me i am about having repeat customers because my work has not needed more attention, others maybe like yourself prefer to fix your own mistakes by repeating said mistake. This is why often the same builder whom uses plywood also has the plumbing done with abs, and to code minimum (ie 1/2" copper/pex where 3/4" is better suited but not needed by code)

...I seldom apply for forums because of these ridiculous assumptions made, but sometimes every now and again somebody just has to hammer it home with their plastic nails and rubber hammer!

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