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vonmod 08-13-2008 12:15 PM

which way to run wood floor?
 
We are installing a new wood floor and are planning on running it the length of the hall. There are 3 bedrooms off the hall? my question is do we change the direction of how it's layed in the hall to run the length of the room or keep it ALL running the same way? When you go into the bedrooms, you will be looking at it running across the room? Please help, they are going to lay it in the next day or two. Thanks

buletbob 08-13-2008 01:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vonmod (Post 148462)
We are installing a new wood floor and are planning on running it the length of the hall. There are 3 bedrooms off the hall? my question is do we change the direction of how it's layed in the hall to run the length of the room or keep it ALL running the same way? When you go into the bedrooms, you will be looking at it running across the room? Please help, they are going to lay it in the next day or two. Thanks

When I install oak flooring I always run the floor in the opposite direction of the floor joists. I have seen it done the same direction of the floor beams but you can see the waves and valleys between the joists in the new floor . My opion looks like Sh$$. If your sub floor is 1x4 or 1x8 as in older homes, and is run the same, then you will have no choice but to go the opposite or on a diagonal. Most older homes knowing that the finished floor was to be strip flooring wood of considered this when being built. then they would of installed the sub floor on a diagonal to compensate for this. so the seems don't fall over the seems of the subfloor. which would cause movement in the finished floor. BOB

Nestor_Kelebay 08-13-2008 02:30 PM

BNy running the wood floor boards perpendicular to the joists, you're making the floor stronger. You don't get that effect if you run the wood flooring parallel to the joists.

Your foot isn't going to go through the floor in either case, but if it wuz me, I'd run it perpendicular to the joists.

If you don't know which way the floor joists go, go to the room below and use a "Stud finder" to locate the ceiling joists in the ceiling below. Even if there's a different set of joists holding up the floor above and ceiling below (which isn't common in houses), the two sets of joists will run parallel to one-another.

brian_ 08-13-2008 07:43 PM

As others have said, do not run parallel to the joists.

IMO running it the same in all rooms looks a lot more continuous and makes everything flow better. However, it is more labor intensive, at least for someone like me who is not a pro. I did 1,200 sq ft, 3 bedrooms, hallway and bonus this past year. It added a lot of time, I was very tempted to saw screw it. Since you're having it done by a pro, shouldn't be that bad for them although make sure they don't try to talk you out of it because it is easier for them. And don't let them get away with putting a transition piece in the doorway for each room, get them to interweave the rooms with the hallway.

I've been in homes that had existing hardwood in one or two rooms (say, living and dining rooms) and you can see where they had hardwood added later in another adjoining room because they will either run the entire newer room perpendicular to the existing floor, or use a threshold/T piece in between rooms if the newer room runs the same direction. Even if it's the same hardwood and matches 100% in color, it just doesn't flow as well. It's tough to interweave an existing floor with a new floor, but worth it in the end.


Other will have a different opinion and can chime in on the subject.

brian_ 08-17-2008 08:23 PM

so what was the final outcome? curious to hear how it ended....

vonmod 08-17-2008 10:06 PM

:mellow:Thanks for asking BUT they haven't started yet. There was a problem with the counter tops and I'm having to get someone else to do them over. So it's back to square one with that and I don't want the floor layed until they finish the counter tops. Sooooo, the way we've decided to do it, when the time comes, is to run them all the same way. All the joists are running the same way except one bedroom and according to the installers it has a thick piece of plywood as a base and they said it wouldn't matter since we're having to use 5/16 strips. So hopefully when all is said and done, it will be right. I hope that is the right advise since everything I've heard is different.

If you have any other words of advice, I will welcome it. Thanks again!

buletbob 08-18-2008 07:31 AM

5/16" Is this a floating floor?. when you stated a new hard wood floor was being installed. everyone, I guess assumed you were having a new 3/4" thick strip floor put in. that's why your getting so many different replies. A floating floor can be installed in any direction. as long as the subfloor is flat, with no humps or valley's. Hope this helps now that we have the right information. BOB

vonmod 08-18-2008 03:40 PM

It's not a floating floor, they're going to nail it down. It's pre finished, 5/16 floor. I don't know too much about it, sorry for the misinformation. But thanks for all your comments. It's helping!


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