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Old 08-28-2008, 04:13 PM   #1
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Waterproof flooring options?


Hello, im looking to install a nice "wood-looking" floor in a section of my basement...the carpeting in this area sometimes get damp. i was wondering what the best option for a hand floor...i defiantly wanna cover the concrete with a laminate, wood, or tile...and idea? thank you

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Old 08-28-2008, 04:53 PM   #2
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Waterproof flooring options?


Since the floor gets wet you need to immediately rule out laminate and wood. Neither will perform well in damp or wet conditions.

Tile would be a better solution, but I still don't think it is good advice to advocate installing any flooring material on a concrete floor that gets moisture.

Have you considered staining the concrete floor? There are so many options and cool effects you can create. If it is an old slab it is no big deal because it gets cleaned with muriatic acid first anyhow. I see a lot of high-end homes with really nice looking stained concrete floors in finished basements. Most people go with a dark brown, and it really looks a lot nicer than basic concrete. You can mask areas and do darker or lighter borders or strips as well.

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Old 08-29-2008, 01:16 PM   #3
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I wouldn’t put wood of any kind in your basement. You will run into a lot of issues. Some issues you might have are mold, separation, splinters, and bowing. They’re really anything that is waterproof. You have to let a concrete floor breathe. I would never totally seal it. I would buy some sheet vinyl and clue it down. I had seen some nice vinyl that looks like real planks of wood with grain and easy to install. Just remember one thing about flooring. You get what you pay for.
Good luck to you and I hope it all works out.

flooring=)

Last edited by flooring; 08-29-2008 at 04:37 PM.
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Old 08-29-2008, 02:46 PM   #4
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Waterproof flooring options?


If the floor is damp you have hydrostatic pressure and therefore should NOT install/ bond anything to it. It will NOT work, even ceramic tiles.

You need to find out why there is water under the slab and then fix it.

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Old 08-30-2008, 04:55 PM   #5
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I would also fix the problem first before installing a floor. Otherwise, try the vinyl route, as it is the cheapest. Here's one article that might help. Good luck!


http://www.oldhouseweb.com/stories/Detailed/15163.shtml
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Old 08-30-2008, 07:59 PM   #6
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Jaz has a good point.
Funny thing is Jaz I argued this same concept over on JBs board. and was laughed out of the room, bunch of ingrates....
I also discussed this issue at the FCI board they had no basic understanding of the laws of physics.
It seems there are a few of you guys out there that are well informed.

The degree he is describing the moisture could even be cappillary action.

You know Einstien wrote a paper on this issue in 1901 I think: Conclusions from the capillarity phenomena.


It seems so few people are aware of the full effect of surface tension and gravity effects.
I am leaning toward the Cap Action but the Hydrostatic Pressure is a good argument although it is mostly based on gravity with surface level slabs and since the basement,we assume is below grade it leans to the creedence of Cap Action.
Troba will work if the floor slopes to a drain.
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Old 08-30-2008, 11:12 PM   #7
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Waterproof flooring options?


My understanding is that you CAN install open backing carpets over concrete basement floors that get wet from below. The moisture can rise up in the valleys of the trowel ridges in the adhesive you glue the carpet down with, and evaporate through the carpet.

Some carpets have acrylic backings, but if you have an open backing on the carpet, then that allows moisture to evaporate right through the carpet.

I don't see why the guy couldn't glue down a polypropylene carpet in his basement as flooring, and just allow the moisture from the concrete to evaporate right through it.
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Old 08-31-2008, 07:47 AM   #8
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Yup, so this is a thermodynamics discussion is it? I just don't see myself getting into that ever again...had enough of it once to last me! and I won't be reading Folgerungen aus den Capillaritätserscheinungen any time soon! LOL!

To me water goes from wet to dry.

So there is moisture coming into this basement. That's not always a bad thing as long as it's not too much. If allowed to enter and exit, then there's less of a problem. Trying to make everything water-tight, insulation and all, is not easy, nor always achievable.

What has Troba got to do with this?
But as always, the start is to find out why and how much water is coming in...
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Old 08-31-2008, 08:05 AM   #9
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Schluter®-TROBA


Function

Schluter-TROBA is a reliable and permanently effective drainage system for use over sloped waterproofing layers. It consists of a pressure-stable polyethylene sheet with perforated studs that form vaultlike cavities between the waterproofing layer and the mortar bed. Any water penetrating the tile covering and the mortar bed passes through the perforations located at the sides of the trapezoid-shaped studs to the sloped waterproofing layer, where it runs off freely through the cavities to the drainage exit.
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Old 08-31-2008, 11:53 AM   #10
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Hugh you just don't get it do you?

THAT is for moisture coming from above, not moisture rising from below. That is a "drainage sysytem" not an encapsulating system.

You aren't very likely to contain rising moisture for very long without damaging something somewhere. I won't even get into hydrostatic with someone that hasn't any ability to grasp the facts.



Quote:
ccarlisle: "So there is moisture coming into this basement. That's not always a bad thing as long as it's not too much. If allowed to enter and exit, then there's less of a problem. Trying to make everything water-tight, insulation and all, is not easy, nor always achievable."
Right there is the information that everyone needs to be digesting.
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Old 08-31-2008, 01:23 PM   #11
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Bud I get it crystal clear.
Lets think about the laws of physics; A breathable overlayment that will allow moisture to flow under it. So when the moisture comes from below were does it go?; It is channel by the Troba and gravity to the lowest spot in the floor.IE: Floor drain.

If we enhance our thought process to involve all aspects of the issue at at find we find there is more than one way to skin that darn cat!

Bud tell me how many times you have spec'd Troba for a job?

I am thinking you should investigate the hydrostatic pressure concept a little further so you sound like you know what you are referring to.
No disrespect intended.
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Old 08-31-2008, 01:55 PM   #12
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NONSENSE!!!

Have a nice holiday!
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Old 08-31-2008, 02:25 PM   #13
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Waterproof flooring options?


Well, not many options but when I come up against such a problem, we use Dorken's DELTA-FL. This is a plastic membrane with air channels underneath, a bit like DITRA. This allows water vapour pressure from underneath the slab to equalize with the pressure above and puts a clamp on further moisture penetration. Mind you, it does let some moisture in but even then, it is kept away from the subflooring material.

You put this membrane right on top of the concrete, then put plywood on top. Carpeting usually goes on top of that. Seems to work fine for us.
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Old 08-31-2008, 02:41 PM   #14
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26yrs:

I understand Troba and get its use; but a still confused as to how this fitsd into the OP's application. I gather he has water in some form coming through his slab...not from above. Perhaps I missed something.

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