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-   -   Which vinyl or laminate tile would you recommend for a bathroom and why? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/vinyl-laminate-tile-would-you-recommend-bathroom-why-83532/)

jamesclark 10-10-2010 11:00 AM

Which vinyl or laminate tile would you recommend for a bathroom and why?
 
I have seen the Armstrong and trafficmaster allure.

Looking for either a peel and stick or interlocking tile not a plank.

Which tile brand would you recommend and why?

I have read the trafficmaster allure thread - opinions on armstrong and other brands would be much appreciated.

claire88ity 10-13-2010 11:32 AM

Hi,
Not keen on either, based on personal experience. Unless you silicone around each tiny gap, water will eventually lift them, no matter what. Why not go for vinyl sheet with a tile pattern? Easier to install and after laying, run a bead of kitchen/ bathroom clear silicone/ silastic around the perimeter to ensure no water gets underneath.
My hubby is a layer and he believes 'push fit' planks and adhesive tiles are dicky, especially for wet areas.
Vinyl sheet 2.5mm thick with a wear layer of 1.5mm+ will not only last longer but is warmer to stand on.
Good luck either way, Claire

Blondesense 10-14-2010 01:57 PM

What she said! ^

I would go with a sheet vinyl too. Peel and stick would be my last choice.

PCMLR 10-14-2010 07:42 PM

I concur with both previous responses if you must go with vinyl. Ceramic tile can be relatively inexpensive, especially for a small area such as a bathroom. Tile is more desireable and is much more of an upgrade by degree, than the increase in cost as opposed to vinyl.

suprvee 10-14-2010 08:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PCMLR (Post 516959)
I concur with both previous responses if you must go with vinyl. Ceramic tile can be relatively inexpensive, especially for a small area such as a bathroom. Tile is more desireable and is much more of an upgrade by degree, than the increase in cost as opposed to vinyl.

X2 on ceramic tile. I'll be remodeling a bathroom as well, and after thinking about it carefully, tile is really a good choice. Depending on what kind of tile you use, it's pretty cheap, and it's pretty easy to install.

Blondesense 10-14-2010 09:00 PM

I tiled our bathroom floor and am in the middle of re-doing our shower with tile. I have to say it is not quite as easy as spreading out thinset and slapping a tile down. I spent a lot of time doing research. With tile you have to consider deflection (bounce) in your floors, if your subfloor is adequate, correct choice of materials (thinset vs mastic, etc.)
While you can find inexpensive tile, you also need to factor in thinset, grout, sealer, beefing up your subfloor, CBU, not to mention all of the tools needed.

Don't get me wrong, I prefer tile. It would be my first choice, but if you don't do it correctly and it starts to crack you have a ugly problem. Sheet vinyl is a lot more forgiving.

.

PCMLR 10-14-2010 10:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blondesense (Post 517000)
I tiled our bathroom floor and am in the middle of re-doing our shower with tile. I have to say it is not quite as easy as spreading out thinset and slapping a tile down. I spent a lot of time doing research. With tile you have to consider deflection (bounce) in your floors, if your subfloor is adequate, correct choice of materials (thinset vs mastic, etc.)
While you can find inexpensive tile, you also need to factor in thinset, grout, sealer, beefing up your subfloor, CBU, not to mention all of the tools needed.

Don't get me wrong, I prefer tile. It would be my first choice, but if you don't do it correctly and it starts to crack you have a ugly problem. Sheet vinyl is a lot more forgiving.

.

Absolutely right. No job is EVER problem free. Even though this forum is meant for DIY, since the construction industry is suffering I'm sure there are plenty of professionals who would do this small job at a reasonable rate. I would wait until I could afford to tile if need be, as linoleum is more of a band-aid than an investment.

A couple hours after I posted the above I felt I acted like a mean girl toward linoleum. It has it's place. In a kitchen it's fine, especially with all the new textures and designs. In a bathroom, I find it conspicuous. I did some research and found this tile which is especially easy to install as it is 12" x 12" and does not require a tile cutter or the insane process of spacing properly. This is a natural stone product and costs about $3 per square foot. This is an affordable upgrade that really won't cost much, if any more than linoleum.
http://images.lowes.com/product/conv...01010213sm.jpg

AskMrJay 10-15-2010 09:20 AM

Hi there jamesclark,

This is Mr. Jay with The Home Depot out in Chicago.

If youíre not up for the plank Allure, then TrafficMaster does carry a nice peel and stick version as well, called Resilient Vinyl Ceramica. They come in the traditional 12 x 12 size, but the main difference is in the thickness of the tile. You can see an example if you click this link, http://bit.ly/amycxL. Itís much sturdier than the average peel and stick tile, and these are actually recommended to be grouted just like you would with regular tile. Simply using a pre-mixed grout in the joints these tiles turn out really nice, and in almost half the time that it would take to do real ceramic. I used it once in a small office area and it turned out really sharp. :yes:

Armstrong also makes great peel and stick, as well as sheet goods. If youíre going to go down the sheet vinyl road I might suggest looking at DuPont, as I have heard good things about their products as well.

Let me know if you have other question.
- Mr. Jay
[Iím a Home Depot Store Associate, trained and authorized to help people on the Internet]

sgbotsford 03-06-2012 03:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AskMrJay (Post 517191)
Hi there jamesclark,

This is Mr. Jay with The Home Depot out in Chicago.

If youíre not up for the plank Allure, then TrafficMaster does carry a nice peel and stick version as well, called Resilient Vinyl Ceramica. They come in the traditional 12 x 12 size, but the main difference is in the thickness of the tile. You can see an example if you click this link, http://bit.ly/amycxL. Itís much sturdier than the average peel and stick tile, and these are actually recommended to be grouted just like you would with regular tile. Simply using a pre-mixed grout in the joints these tiles turn out really nice, and in almost half the time that it would take to do real ceramic. I used it once in a small office area and it turned out really sharp. :yes:

Armstrong also makes great peel and stick, as well as sheet goods. If youíre going to go down the sheet vinyl road I might suggest looking at DuPont, as I have heard good things about their products as well.

Let me know if you have other question.
- Mr. Jay
[Iím a Home Depot Store Associate, trained and authorized to help people on the Internet]


Mr. Jay -- I have another post made 6 March on how I plan to use ceramica. Brief: I had vinyl over 3/8 particle board over 5/8 plywood over joists on 12" centers. 60 square feet of the particle board were water damaged. What are my best options for repairing this?

sgbotsford 03-06-2012 03:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blondesense (Post 516815)
What she said! ^

I would go with a sheet vinyl too. Peel and stick would be my last choice.

Oh, I can think of worse floors:

Dirt floor. Gravel floor. Sand floor. Rushes. Straw. Wood chips. :)

The Allure system locks together quite well. In a bathroom I'd still caulk at the edges. I'd also be tempted to use a vinyl sealer too, but try first to see how badly it shows.

Ceramica won't be water tight -- but you can apply it over the existing vinyl -- it acts as your water barrier.

There are a lot of notes about bad grout for ceramica. They may be fixed now. My reno friend applies it without grout. Looks great. For vinyl tile.

Ceramica is cheap. You can get a few years out of it while you save for real tile.

Real tile isn't expensive, but the auxiliary costs can bite pretty hard. I've done two hearths and a laundry room in tile. All three projects came out well. Both took a LONG time. (I'm a farmer. In winter I work on the house. I figure that it takes me 3-4 times as long to do a job as it would take a pro -- but it costs 1/3 to 1/4 of the price.


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