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Old 10-31-2012, 09:14 PM   #1
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Very large area to level?


So I just bought my first house and want to replace ALL flooring before I move in. Its about 950 sq ft altogether. Problem is there are different levels in almost every room. Some are original subfloors some are from an addition. Some were carpet some vinyl. Im wondering if using self leveling concrete first before installing the plank laminate is a good idea? I need a professional opinion because Ive gotten enough amateur advice to make my head spin! Thanks for reading and all advice is appreciated!

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Old 10-31-2012, 10:25 PM   #2
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Very large area to level?


When you say every room is a different level you're talking with the current floor coverings which is not relevant because you're going to remove them. The framing of the original structure should be the same, if there's an addition or if part is a slab, then you'll have a difference in height.

You might be able to make everything the same level with the proper use of expansion joints where the substrate changes and where the maximum size is reached. We really don't have enough info to give a good answer at this time though.

If you can give a brief but thorough explanation of the areas, we may be able to help.

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Old 11-01-2012, 07:55 AM   #3
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Very large area to level?


Underneath the current flooring the rooms still do not match up when it comes to depth. For example at the door of a room it drops down an inch. I am just learning all of this so bear with me. The slab section is also off about an inch. I dont know what expansion joints are but do you think that would work better or be cheaper than the concrete? Thanks again!
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Old 11-01-2012, 08:28 AM   #4
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Very large area to level?


may be some photos would aid
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Old 11-01-2012, 08:42 AM   #5
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Very large area to level?


Even a drawing would be better then nothing.
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Old 11-01-2012, 08:50 AM   #6
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Very large area to level?


Ill post some pics as soon as I can because artistic skills are not here. I must not be explaining it very well if pics are needed but thanks anyway!
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Old 11-05-2012, 12:23 PM   #7
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Very large area to level?


yeah its very difficult to understand without pics please post some pics to well understanding level. As you say some rooms are up and some are down then it would be very costly to level all of them.
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Last edited by Gaven32; 11-07-2012 at 07:22 AM. Reason: correction
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Old 11-05-2012, 03:23 PM   #8
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Very large area to level?


Heres the only pic I have. Does this help at all?

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Old 11-07-2012, 03:31 AM   #9
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Very large area to level?


The specific type of substrate will determine the best way to flatten your subfloor enough to successfully install a laminate over it. Most every laminate worth considering will state that you must not exceed 1/4" of surface variation over a 10 foot span. That's less than 1/32 variation up or down per one lineal foot, so yeah, your floor needs to be flat or you're going to have problems both short term and long term.

Are all of your subfloors the same? Are they wood, or concrete? If they are wood then what type of wood subfloor, also, what type of concrete (slab or suspended?)?

Concrete and wood expand and contract, and deal with humidity and ground moisture differently, so anywhere that they 2 materials meet will need to be addressed accordingly. If your new flooring is a floating floor that will help tremendously, but certain measures might still need to be taken in subfloor preparation. Any other info. and details that you can give will help.

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