DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Flooring (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/)
-   -   Under cut metal door jamb (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/under-cut-metal-door-jamb-6765/)

peter1 02-28-2007 09:12 AM

Under cut metal door jamb
 
I'm about to replace the old carpet with laminate flooring in one of the rooms (and possibly beyond). A possible show stopper (as I just realized) is that the door has metal door jamb around it.

I would image it's a lot more difficult to under cut metal than wood, so it won't be easy to slide the laminate plank underneath. Should I just leave an expansion gap around the jamb then fill the gap with acrylic flexible sealant?

If I want to do it properly, what is the best tool/way to under cut the metal door jamb?

Thanks in advance.

JazMan 02-28-2007 11:11 PM

Peter,

That doesn't sound like such a good idea to me. Steel jambs are usually set on the floor unlike wooden ones which are nailed to the studs. I think plan "B" is best.:yes:

Jaz

peter1 03-01-2007 01:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JazMan (Post 35152)
Peter,

That doesn't sound like such a good idea to me. Steel jambs are usually set on the floor unlike wooden ones which are nailed to the studs. I think plan "B" is best.:yes:

Jaz

Thanks for the reply, what's plan B?

Btw, I need a power saw to cut the planks. I'm think circular or jig saw, which is better (in terms of ease of use and the finished cut)?

Thanks.

Zero Punch 03-01-2007 10:32 PM

I undercut metal jambs it's the only way to get a finished look. I use a metal cutting blade on a 4 in grinder. If you are not familiar with using one I suggest a hack saw blade in one of those blade holders for tight places It may take awhile but I've done it that way in a pinch.

If you question which saws should be used, I question your ability to handle this project. It is most likely you will need both a circular saw and a jig saw though if only one will be used I'd go with a jig saw as it is more versatile in the number of cuts/shapes it is able to make whereas the circular saw is a straight line cut. It will take longer for the majority of cuts you will most likely be making as a jig saw is less aggressive in cutting action. When I do laminate I use a 10 in table saw, a 12 in miter saw and a jig saw and all with the PROPER blades for laminate.

May I suggest you look at vinyl plank if your substrate is sound you can lay it right over it and all you need to cut it is a utility knife for all your cuts and is much easier to install than laminate. No need to undercut jambs as a tight fit can be had without the need for expansion as called for by laminate.

That would be a good "Plan B"

AtlanticWBConst. 03-02-2007 08:49 AM

Another option is to install your flooring with the expansion gaps around it. Then install a reasonably thin threshold stock (cut to fit the areas around the door jambs -precisely). That threshold would cover (sit on top of) any transitions and expansion gaps...

Stop the laminate short of the running directly thru the door - Leave a space across the door opening - to install the threshold directly to the subfloor. Install it in such a way that it's edges area still on top of the laminate (allowing it to 'float' = expand and contract)....

FWIW: We sometimes fabricate our own wood stock trim/transitions/etc... pieces when installing some laminate floors. We do this if there are 'different from the norm' issues that we may run into. Example: Wrought Iron Spiral staircase, wrought Iron railing system, etc... We get similar grained 'looking' wood stock and match the stain of the laminate flooring....

peter1 03-02-2007 09:06 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Zero Punch (Post 35288)
If you question which saws should be used, I question your ability to handle this project. It is most likely you will need both a circular saw and a jig saw though if only one will be used I'd go with a jig saw as it is more versatile in the number of cuts/shapes it is able to make whereas the circular saw is a straight line cut. It will take longer for the majority of cuts you will most likely be making as a jig saw is less aggressive in cutting action.

I thought circular saw would be better at long straight cuts. Reason I asked was because I watched a how-to DVD, and they (supposely pros) were using a heavy duty miter saw for width cuts and jig saw for length cuts. I'm sure they have no shortage of tools, so I wonder why they didn't use a circular or even table saw for the long cuts.

Circular saw is new to me, never operated one before. I guess from a safety point of view I'd better stick with a jig saw (and perhaps an entry level table saw).

Grinding the metal door jamb will be the tricky part, I have to think about that. The gap filler idea was from a guide I read on the net, attached is the relevant page from that guide (pdf inside the zip file). Maybe I should just hire an installer (that will easily double the cost), but then laminate is meant to be DIY, correct?

peter1 03-02-2007 09:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 35336)
Another option is to install your flooring with the expansion gaps around it. Then install a reasonably thin threshold stock (cut to fit the areas around the door jambs -precisely). That threshold would cover (sit on top of) any transitions and expansion gaps...

Stop the laminate short of the running directly thru the door - Leave a space across the door opening - to install the threshold directly to the subfloor. Install it in such a way that it's edges area still on top of the laminate (allowing it to 'float' = expand and contract)....

Thanks for the alternative. I may have to take a picture (after removing th carpet) and draw on it to show if I have understand your points correct, but roughly I have some idea now.

mcvane 03-19-2007 04:00 PM

Laminate is generally advertised to be a DIY install
 
Hey Peter.

It looks like you are going through what I'm planning on doing and have already found some issues with the ease of installation.

I'm not a pro by any means, but would like to be able to install laminate for a spare bedroom that would improve the looks of the dying carpet.

If you'd like to contact me directly so we can share our project notes, send me an email at mcvane@hotmail.com

Take care!

McVane.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:31 PM.