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-   -   type of flooring used for 80yr old house (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/type-flooring-used-80yr-old-house-141500/)

echobravo 04-25-2012 03:48 PM

type of flooring used for 80yr old house
 
what is the typical type of wood used for flooring in an 80 yr old house?

When i removed my carpet and exposed the wood floor under it and i saw some strips have deep gouges and splintering cracks.

I would like to replace them but im not sure what type of wood it is.
so i have 2 questions

#1 what is the typical wood flooring for 80 yr old houses

#2 i do not have a sub floor, so would i need to remove the whole strip from joist to joist to have something to nail it back down to or is there another way to tackle this?

any pointers/helpful instructions is greatly appreciated

user1007 04-25-2012 04:27 PM

When you pulled the carpet are you lookiing at finished flooring or an old tongue and groove subfloor? My guess is the latter. The fact that you found splinters and gouges suggests a subfloor as well.

Finished floors could be anything and knowing where you are and some pictures might help.

Hardwoods like oak, maple and cherry were common but in the late 1800s and into the 20th Century it was not uncommon to find nice hardwood downstairs in parlors, living rooms and dining rooms that were shown off and pine or fir in upstairs living areas like bedrooms.

If what you have is a subfloor, you can hopefully repair it and pick hardwood, bamboo, or similar material for a new finish floor. You would nail it down like any t&g flooring.

echobravo 04-26-2012 09:02 AM

the wood floors look like they were finished at one point and there is definitly no subfloor i can see basement light through the spaces in the flooring strips

ill get some picture up tonite

echobravo 04-29-2012 09:24 AM

as you can see these floors are in rough shape
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2...ow1/IMG144.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2...w1/IMG144a.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2...w1/IMG144b.jpg

there is a few trouble spots like this. this is the worst of it.

i was also thinking of just installing laminate overtop of this flooring
but im concerned about the floor being uneven in a certain spot. when i walk over it i can tell there is a slight "bump" in the floor and i also thought just sanding it smooth or removing just those pieces and replacing them and then put the laminate down.

any pros/cons, thoughts/opinions/suggestions?

user1007 04-29-2012 10:31 AM

Given you say this has been nailed with out subflooring? Must have always been rather squeaky by the way? I would pull it out, level your floor joists, put down a decent sub-floor and then think about the new floor you want to put on it. I happen to hate laminate flooring but even it will not do well without a halfway decent subfloor.

Not what you wanted to hear? Sorry.

echobravo 04-29-2012 06:18 PM

pulling it up isnt an option, i just dont have the money to do all that.

gregzoll 04-29-2012 07:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by echobravo (Post 910369)
pulling it up isnt an option, i just dont have the money to do all that.

Do not really know what to tell you then.

Daniel Holzman 04-29-2012 07:48 PM

The standard way to install hardwood flooring is to install an acceptable subfloor, typically plywood, then nail the hardwood down over the subfloor. You apparently don't have a subfloor, so unless you install a subfloor, by definition you would be doing a non-standard installation if you removed the existing flooring and installed new flooring.

That said, if you don't have the money to install a subfloor, you can certainly replace individual pieces of the existing floor, it will be better than what you have. Remove the offending pieces, take them to a lumberyard (not a big box store, a real lumberyard), let them identify the species, and see if they can match it. Someday down the road if you have the funds, you can remove the entire floor, install subflooring, and put down a standard hardwood installation.

user1007 04-30-2012 12:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman (Post 910440)
The standard way to install hardwood flooring is to install an acceptable subfloor, typically plywood, then nail the hardwood down over the subfloor. You apparently don't have a subfloor, so unless you install a subfloor, by definition you would be doing a non-standard installation if you removed the existing flooring and installed new flooring.

That said, if you don't have the money to install a subfloor, you can certainly replace individual pieces of the existing floor, it will be better than what you have. Remove the offending pieces, take them to a lumberyard (not a big box store, a real lumberyard), let them identify the species, and see if they can match it. Someday down the road if you have the funds, you can remove the entire floor, install subflooring, and put down a standard hardwood installation.

Hate to hear myself recommending this. But nice carpet padding and decent WTW might be the way to go until you can afford a subfloor and real flooring.

I really have not recommended WTW in decades but for some commercial clients. It can work I guess. Overspend on the padding. Chimp change carpeting will last near a lifetime with decent padding under it.

Please heed the advice here. You cannot lay down a finished hardwood, bamboo or whatever floor without a subfloor.

Ironlight 04-30-2012 12:40 AM

Just because you can see light through the floor in places does not mean there is no subfloor. Does the floor run in the same direction when viewed from below, in the basement, as the floor from above? If so then you almost certainly don't have a subfloor. If the boards run diagonally or perpenticular to the boards when viewed from above then you have a subfloor.

It's hard to tell if that is pine or oak. I'm leaning towards pine because I don't see the grain of oak but it's difficult to tell for sure from those photos.

Whatever it is, also consider painting it. I've seen quite a few painted old wood floors over the years, some of them incredibly elegant looking. It would certainly be the easiest and least expensive option. Scrub it clean, use wood filler, sand, prime, and paint with a floor enamel.

http://assets.curbly.com/photos/0000...mila_after.jpg

RhodesHardwood 04-30-2012 01:34 AM

The flooring looks like Douglas Fir to me. You could probably lay a new floor over the existing hardwood.

echobravo 04-30-2012 09:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman (Post 910440)
Remove the offending pieces, take them to a lumberyard (not a big box store, a real lumberyard), let them identify the species, and see if they can match it.

and if they cant?
removing a piece of it and if it cant be matched how to do repair that spot?
at that point can i just put anything in there or what would you do if you were in this situation.


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