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Old 01-24-2008, 10:43 PM   #1
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Trivertine all thruout the house... or too much?


wanted to install new flooring in my house. It is a small place about 1000sqft total. I thought about trivertine 24x24 (since designers say that large tiles make small places look bigger). I was wondering if I should install the same type of floor all over the house (rooms, restroom, kitchen and living room) or will it be too much. I did not want to have carpet in bedrooms, then a different tile style in restroom and the rest trivertine 24x24 since it would probably make the space look in pieces and not allow a flow. I really need sugestions, please what do you think?.

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Old 01-25-2008, 01:14 PM   #2
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Trivertine all thruout the house... or too much?


The first thing to consider when installing a natural stone tile is the strength of the subfloor system. Many forget this. Very few homes are built to meet the deflection standards required for these tiles. Usually if natural stone is to be used, the builder must make necessary changes in the subfloor construction.

The standard maximum deflection allowed in the codes I'm aware of is L360. That means 1" in 360". This is the bare minimum standard for ceramic and porcelain tiles. Stone tiles require no more than L720 deflection. So your house may not meet this standard as is? You can still have travertine, but not with a regular thin set method, unless you can reduce deflection.

Other than that you need to know that most natural stone floors require lots more maintenance, cost more than ceramic and labor is also more.

However, the results would be really nice. Or....look for a porcelain look alike. Cheaper and much easier to live with.

Jaz

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Old 01-25-2008, 02:02 PM   #3
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Trivertine all thruout the house... or too much?


Thanks Jaz for all this information. It really makes me reconsider my plan. Is ceramic and poercelain tile the same?. The badget is tight so I guess trivertine is out of question. Plus it requires more maintenance.
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Old 01-25-2008, 03:31 PM   #4
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Trivertine all thruout the house... or too much?


In general terms both are ceramic, but porcelain is better in every way. I have porcelain that comes in sizes up to 36x36". Yikes that's big!!

Are you planning to do the work? Where are you?

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Old 01-27-2008, 05:03 PM   #5
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Trivertine all thruout the house... or too much?


Quote:
Originally Posted by gante View Post
Thanks Jaz for all this information. It really makes me reconsider my plan. Is ceramic and poercelain tile the same?. The badget is tight so I guess trivertine is out of question. Plus it requires more maintenance.
Poercelain is basically the same material fired at a hotter temperature in the kiln, which makes it more durable (harder), but also more brittle to work with. It was a commercial product that has filtered down to the residential market, and IMO is not necessary for residential conditions, but it is the new in demand flooring by HO's. Remember ceramic tile is like everything else, you get the quality you pay for; cheap ceramic is going to perform poorly over the long term.

Travertine is a soft stone and I do not recommend it for spaces that take hard use. It is best left to entry foyers and such IMO, but your limited budjet will take is out as an option anyway. There are a couple of ceramic/poercelains out there that are very good imitations of the real stuff, look around at different brands.

Also, the larger the individual tile, the more critical the flatness of the floor is.
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Old 01-28-2008, 03:59 PM   #6
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Trivertine all thruout the house... or too much?


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In general terms both are ceramic, but porcelain is better in every way. I have porcelain that comes in sizes up to 36x36". Yikes that's big!!

Are you planning to do the work? Where are you?

Jaz
I live in southern california. I would like to do the work my self but I just don't have the experience to do so. Most likely I will have to get a proffessional to get it done right the first time.

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