Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Flooring

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-18-2009, 12:26 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Travertine Upstairs


I plan to replace my carpet upstairs and want to know what materials, if any, will be needed in addition to the glue, travertine, spacers, grout and sealer.

Deb K is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2009, 01:08 PM   #2
Stuck in the 70's
 
Blondesense's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: south central Missouri
Posts: 2,162
Rewards Points: 1,018
Default

Travertine Upstairs


I'm not an expert, I just read this forum waaay too much.

Along with that you will need tools such as trowel, grout float, sponges, etc. along with some method of cutting the tile (saw etc.) You also want to be sure you have chosen the right "glue", ie thinset, for the application.

I don't know if you are planning on doing this yourself or are purchasing supplies for someone with more of a background in tiling but I'll throw this out just in case: Before you start buying stuff, you want to be absolutely sure your floor will handle travertine. If there is too much deflection (or bounce) in the floor your grout will crack, tiles will pop off and you'll end up with a mess.

At the top of the flooring forum is a sub-forum for tiling. I would recommend poking around there a bit.

Not affiliated with the following (nod to the mods), but this site might also help you with more research on tiling.

http://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin/index.php?

http://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin/deflecto.pl


Last edited by Blondesense; 10-18-2009 at 01:13 PM.
Blondesense is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2009, 01:54 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Travertine Upstairs


I am not a professional but my house has been forgiving of my experiments and blunders so far and although I would like to give this tiling thing a try - I can't find the time. I am hiring two somewhat experienced family members to do the work for me but my plan is to have everything ready for their arrival. I just spent some time on the site you recommended and will continue to do some research. My problem is not knowing what everything is that they are referencing. I am worried about whether I need anything between the plywood (subflooring?) and the travertine.
Deb K is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2009, 02:34 PM   #4
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 4,254
Rewards Points: 2,086
Default

Travertine Upstairs


Hopefully the folks you have recruited to do the project are familiar with tiling. Travertine is a relatively soft stone, and you should think carefully about how you want to seal it before you put it in. Also, stone tiles are not very forgiving about a floor that flexes too much. You need to compute the deflection of the floor under the tile to determine if the joists are sufficiently rigid to allow tiling. Typically, the allowable deflection for stone is on the order of 1/600. This means that for a 10 foot span (120 inches), the maximum allowable deflection at the center of the span is 1/5 inch.

In order to compute the deflection, you need to know the span of the joists, and the load. Check previous threads in this forum for further discussion about deflection and tile. If you use stone on a floor that is not rigid enough, you risk cracking the stone.

The stone tile manufacturer will probably have specs on the allowable deflection, and also the required subfloor preparation. For stone, it is common to require a total of approximately 1-1/4 inches subfloor thickness, typically consisting of 5/8 inch thick sheathing or board overlaid with 5/8 inch plywood. Again, you need to check the specifications of the manufacturer for the minimum floor preparation.

If you are planning to use Ditramat or similar, you can check their web site (google Ditra) and there is an enormous amount of information on exactly how to prepare the floor, minimum thickness of subfloor, allowable deflection etc. If you use Ditra, you will need both modified and unmodified thinset; check their website for details. If you elect not to use Ditra or equivalent, you typically use modified thinset, but again you need to check with the stone manufacturer for specific installation practice.
Daniel Holzman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2009, 11:48 AM   #5
Stuck in the 70's
 
Blondesense's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: south central Missouri
Posts: 2,162
Rewards Points: 1,018
Default

Travertine Upstairs


My experience consists of tiling one bathroom floor and a couple of repair jobs, so like I mentioned, I'm not an expert but I'll throw out a few random thoughts I've learned along the way.

I used ceramic tile in my bathroom. I've never touched travertine, but I have read that the procedures (grouting and sealing ) are different than ceramic. From what I've read here grouting travertine (or rather cleaning up the grout) can be a challenge. Keep this in mind when doing research.

Before I started I went to the library and borrowed a book on tiling. I know its old fashioned not to get all your information off of the internet, but I liked having that book near at hand to reference and study. Procedures and supplies change, so find one that is current. Then come and ask specific questions here. These guys (and gals) helped me a lot! (Over many, many home improvement projects I have found the helpful people at the apron stores (Lowe's and Home Depot etc.) may or may not know what they are talking about. I would double check any advice you get from them - including which thinset to use).


A couple things on grout. Don't let your friends dump the excess grout down your toilet or sink. I've read it can set up underwater and clog your pipes. Don't know if it is true or not, but why take a chance.

Lastly, a common newbie mistake is cleaning up the grout at the wrong time. Cleaning it too soon and you pull too much of it out. On the other hand if you decide to call it a day and clean it up the next morning it will cement itself to the tile and be durn near impossible to remove. Follow the instructions on the box or bag.

Good luck!
Blondesense is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2009, 08:23 PM   #6
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 3
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Travertine Upstairs


I appreciate yours and Dan H's opinions and guidance and because of it recruited a third party to help with my project. He knows flooring and will help the two family members. Although, at this point, I still wouldn't trust myself to do the job - I feel so much more knowledgeable because of this site and people like you that are willing to take the time to share their experiences. Thank you.
Deb K is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2009, 06:20 AM   #7
Member
 
ccarlisle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 1,889
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

Travertine Upstairs


Good. As you can gather from the advice given, tiling jobs using natural stone usually start with a calculation of deflection of the floor you plan to tile; this is because deflection will crack your tile and/or grout lines and most of the houses built are not be designed to take on the load of stone floors. In many cases, beefing up the floor joists from below is the only way to guarantee a good job over time.

Now some people can live with cracks - but most can't and it would be a shame to have spent all the money just to have to do it again. So sufficent opinions on deflection are worth the investment.

You'll have the choice of a honed or a polished surface on the travertine; and also filled-holes or not filled holes. Your choice really, but be aware of the dos-and-don't of each type. Once you've got all that under control, there are reference standards out there that give you precise details as to grout type, trowel size etc etc that will make the job go alot smoother.

As in most things, preparation to do the job well is about 80% of the job itself. You'll want to do it right the first time - because the alternatives are expensive.

Oh yeah - find out precisely where your travertine comes from; they sell cheap stuff at the big box stores and you'll spend the $ better somewhere else.

__________________
“The average American woman is about 25 pounds heavier than she was in 1960...Recognizing obesity as a disease will help change the way the medical community tackles this complex issue that affects approximately 1 in 3 Americans,”
ccarlisle is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
cream trim downstairs, white trim upstairs, advice for stairs? allyr Painting 1 09-26-2009 04:01 PM
travertine floors Keith Carlson Ceramic Flooring 4 09-29-2008 11:41 PM
HVAC Upstairs QUESTION Statecowboy HVAC 1 09-15-2007 11:15 AM
baseboard heat upstairs not working TraceyLee HVAC 1 10-23-2005 05:47 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.