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Old 09-10-2008, 07:48 AM   #1
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Tiling Class


So, we have been planning on installing tile in a small downstairs bathroom for a few months now. I have been lurking here and over at JohnBridge's site and we have the materials picked out, the tile purchased, the old flooring removed, and are about ready to go. Home Depot has a tiling class that lasts about an hour every Saturday (well, almost every Saturday... not when a hurricane is coming or has just passed ... or when they are understaffed...).

Has anyone ever been to one of these classes? Are they worth waiting for?

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Old 09-10-2008, 09:30 AM   #2
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I have been to one I thought it was a joke.Someone asked how you cut the tile for around a pipe and the guy had no ideal of what to do.He told the people that they sell premade tile for around pipe.He just couldnt figure out how to cut and nip out a section for that area.If you have a stone and tile store (not the box store) around you they will show you just what to do or just ask on here alot of the folks on here are real heplfull

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Old 09-10-2008, 09:53 AM   #3
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Well, I only have two real questions after hanging out and reading here for so long (well, only two questions for now ) 1) My bathroom floor is at max, 35 square feet. There will be some cutting of tiles needed around the edges and around the toilet but I will wait until we dry set the tiles to see exactly how convoluted those cuts need to be. I will be using Mapei's Ultraflex2 thinset to adhere the tiles to a concrete floor that had vinyl flooring attached. The thinset comes in 25 pound bags and the instructions are for 3 quarts of water. I am not going to be mixing it all at once as I am a newbie at this. What is the "best" amount to try to mix per batch at first? I figure that means 400 oz in weight in thinset gets 96 fluid oz in water so I can do the math to figure out water needed for a certain weight of thinset... I just do not know how much would be good to start with. 2) The whole downstairs (except kitchen) was carpeted. The bathroom has two door ways - one to a bedroom one to a hallway. The bedroom and hallway carpeting will be replaced with engineered/laminate wood flooring before this is all done with. So, what is right under my doors? Or where SHOULD my threshold transition be? on the bathroom side edge of the door or the hallway/bedroom side edge of the door? or, since the door is roughly 1 1/3" thich, right in the middle? Are there "standards" for this?
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Old 09-10-2008, 10:17 AM   #4
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Tiling Class


35sqft is really not that much area to tile but since you havnt done it before you dont know how fast the thinset will set up on you so just mix a small pal at a time so as not to waste much.It should go quickly until you get around those area like the toilet or a supply line if it comes up through the floor but dry fitting and precutting will help.As for the other I dont know for sure but I dont think their is a standred for that IMO I would put it in the middel but I could be wrong on that someone else may chime in for a better answer
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Old 09-10-2008, 01:14 PM   #5
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Typically interior doors are 1-3/8" thick and you would stop the tile under the center of the door. This is done so that each room shows only the floor covering of that room when the door is closed.

That's the rule-of-thumb but you can do it any way that looks good to you.

You will have plenty of "pot-life" with whatever amount of thinset you decide to mix. You don't have to be precise (to the nth degree) about measuring the water and weighing the powder. Thinset (unlike grout) is very forgiving when you mix it. I would start with less than a quart of water and add powder while you mix until the consistency is that of creamy peanut butter or toothpaste. You will be fine. Once you get the hang of it you will know how much thinset to mix and how long it will take you to use it.

Mix the thinset, let it sit about ten minutes and thoroughly mix it again.

Decide on your layout and put some guidelines on the floor. When you come to a cut make the cut and dry-fit the tile BEFORE you spread any thinset to be sure it fits properly.

Last edited by Bud Cline; 09-10-2008 at 01:17 PM.
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Old 09-11-2008, 08:28 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bud Cline View Post
Typically interior doors are 1-3/8" thick and you would stop the tile under the center of the door. This is done so that each room shows only the floor covering of that room when the door is closed.

That's the rule-of-thumb but you can do it any way that looks good to you.
Cool! I kept thinking of the carpet but we will be replacing carpet with "wood" soon enough and I think splitting the door will be a better option for that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bud Cline View Post
You will have plenty of "pot-life" with whatever amount of thinset you decide to mix. You don't have to be precise (to the nth degree) about measuring the water and weighing the powder. Thinset (unlike grout) is very forgiving when you mix it. I would start with less than a quart of water and add powder while you mix until the consistency is that of creamy peanut butter or toothpaste. You will be fine. Once you get the hang of it you will know how much thinset to mix and how long it will take you to use it.

Mix the thinset, let it sit about ten minutes and thoroughly mix it again.
"Pot life" is the time it will remain usable in a covered bucket? "Open life" is the time it is still workable once it is spread? I think the Ultraflex2 has a 2 hour pot life and 20 minute open life.

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Decide on your layout and put some guidelines on the floor. When you come to a cut make the cut and dry-fit the tile BEFORE you spread any thinset to be sure it fits properly.
I am going to try and dry set most of the tiles this evening so we can get the best layout to minimize slivers of tile along the edges while still keeping a nice layout in front of the doors, etc. The tile edges have a slightly wavy edge to them and the corners are sort of rounded so I am not sure how easy it will be to use spacers so the guidelines will be important. You just spread the thinset so it does not cover up the lines? or in reality are you using the lines outside of your thinset area to line the tiles up?

Thanks for your response!
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Old 09-11-2008, 09:01 AM   #7
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Actually those wavy tiles are still square. Do layout lines and stay with them faithfully on one side when the tiles are installed. If there is any error let it go to the next grout line. Then the next row do the same, stay with the layout religiously and let any error go to the next grout line.

Spacers will only screw things up with that tile. Also shorten up on your desired grout-line spacing. Those tiles when grouted show a much larger grout line then you would think.

Stay with the layout on one side of the tile and after the grout is installed everything will blend nicely and you won't notice the errors.
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Old 09-12-2008, 01:15 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Bud Cline View Post
Actually those wavy tiles are still square. Do layout lines and stay with them faithfully on one side when the tiles are installed. If there is any error let it go to the next grout line. Then the next row do the same, stay with the layout religiously and let any error go to the next grout line.

Spacers will only screw things up with that tile. Also shorten up on your desired grout-line spacing. Those tiles when grouted show a much larger grout line then you would think.

Stay with the layout on one side of the tile and after the grout is installed everything will blend nicely and you won't notice the errors.
I am trying to do a dry run layout and got tired of all my gaps being different so I did buy myself a bag of spacers to help me line things up dry. I do plan on using layout lines for the actual layout though. I think spacers give you a false sense of security - especially with these wavy tiles.

Here is my quandary. I have moved these things around all over and so far this is my "best" layout yet. I am using 3/16" spacers for the layout.

For lack of a better description, I have a sort of backward-s-shaped bathroom. There is a main entry from the hallway and then a secondary entry from the guest bedroom. In order to get the tiles centered in both doorways (and otherwise not having too large of a gap next to a wall) I am still left with the following. I have attached pictures of a "full view" and then the front gap and the back gap. There is a 1 3/4" gap left in the door way and then next to the tub. We are thinking of using a 2" marble threshold for the doorway which could take up that space quite nicely actually (although it is white marble against the blue gray tile). I am not sure what to do with the back gap. Put in matching marble threshold along the tub?

Any advice or suggestions?
Attached Thumbnails
Tiling Class-316_full_view.jpg   Tiling Class-back_gap.jpg   Tiling Class-front_gap.jpg  

Last edited by dumbunusedid; 09-12-2008 at 01:17 PM.
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Old 09-12-2008, 04:12 PM   #9
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BUMMER!!! Those dimensions are causing narrow cuts you don't really want. I would pull the whole layout exactly 1/2 tile towards the door. This will give you a larger cut at the tub and a larger cut at the door if you don't use a the marble threshold.

Right to left, keep what you have now and take what you get behind the toilet.

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