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Old 01-22-2010, 01:59 PM   #1
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Tiling bathroom floor


I asked someone in the flooring department at Home Depot if you could tile over existing tile, and they said yes, to just score the top of the old tile with steel wool then I should be all set to go. Also, they say that it is not recommended to use marble or smooth tile for the sake of getting wet and becoming slippery. Are both of these true? The only reason I question their expertise is because sometime Home Depot hires people who aren't qualified to answer those questions. (I used to work there back in the day, specialized in doors, windows and paint, and they had me in plumbing... go figure)

Anyway, just wondering if I can tile over existing tile and how you recommend I go about doing it. If so, should I remove the toilet and sink basin? I checked under the door and I definitely have about an inch clearance all the way through the swing.

And the reason I ask about the tile being smooth is that I found a tile I'd like to use, but couldn't find any in the rough textured tiles that I'd care to use. I was looking at the black marble with white veining. I'm kinda limited on the colors to use since the tile on my walls are peach and black. My floor has the tiny square tiles and it's peach. I can't stand the sight of it anymore. Any help would be appreciated!

John

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Old 01-22-2010, 02:08 PM   #2
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Tiling bathroom floor


oh man, thats the classic 50's style tile job. People kill to go retro like that again. My place in Berkley MI was baby-blue and white, friends had the seafoam green and black. I painted the grout, freshened it up and it looked killer.

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Old 01-22-2010, 02:12 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by ferris13 View Post
oh man, thats the classic 50's style tile job. People kill to go retro like that again. My place in Berkley MI was baby-blue and white, friends had the seafoam green and black. I painted the grout, freshened it up and it looked killer.
Yeah, but peach? I'd take baby blue and white or seafoam green and black over peach any day! lol

Last edited by jho; 01-22-2010 at 02:20 PM.
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Old 01-22-2010, 02:21 PM   #4
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Tiling bathroom floor


yeah....i know.... .

Not sure about tiling over it. Wait for a response on that.

If your floor is cracked then obviously don't. Pull it up and properly prepare the floor. Only thing under it is a few inches of morter bed and then 1x6 subfloor boards (circular saw with masonry blade, set the depth and cut it up in the tile and mortar in sections).
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Old 01-22-2010, 02:26 PM   #5
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Tiling bathroom floor


Lovely colors...all of those!

John, It doesn't happen very often but you got correct answers from the flooring department at your HD. (was it Mad. Hghts?). Well....with the exception of the steel wool recommendation. I recommend scuffing with a Carborundum brick or with 60-80 grit on a belt sander. Then super clean and rinse.

Use a high grade latex modified thin set mortar (bag), to set tiles. Do not use polished marble. Also do not use a tile that is too rough or textured. Matte finish smooth or with slight texture is good. Black will not be easy to find.

All this is contingent on the old floor being in good condition. Remove the toilet, and pedestal sink, if any. Do the walls all have tile with a base molding at the bottom? Is the marble threshold high enough above the floor?

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Old 01-22-2010, 03:26 PM   #6
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The steel wool suggestion is hilarious. LMAO at that one.

Follow Jaz's advice.

I will also add that the hard black marble with hard white veins running through it that almost look like lightning bolts is beautiful stuff. I will warn you however that that particular tile can have a super high mortality rate when it comes to cutting it. The white veins are fissured and will easily break away from the black body when cutting the tiles. Be sure to buy extra tile for that reason. The tiles will also give off a slight sewer odor when they are cut but that will go away in a few hours.
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Old 01-23-2010, 10:04 PM   #7
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I'm glad I stumbled on to this. Talking about inch or two of mortar under the tile...
I'm demo'ing a bathroom with an inch or two of what looks like poured concrete on the floor, and what looks like up to 4 inches of concrete in the shower pan. Would a big sledge hammer do the job or would that end up busting out the floor?
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Old 01-24-2010, 03:16 PM   #8
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I'm demo'ing a bathroom with an inch or two of what looks like poured concrete on the floor, and what looks like up to 4 inches of concrete in the shower pan. Would a big sledge hammer do the job or would that end up busting out the floor?
The concrete under the tile could be an old fashion "mud-job", wouldn't be unusual. Could also be a "Self Leveling Compound Job". The thickness of the shower floor also isn't unusual.

A sledge hammer is probably the most efficient means of removal.

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