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-   -   tile, wood or laminate for kitchen/foyer? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/tile-wood-laminate-kitchen-foyer-36831/)

goldfam 01-25-2009 09:19 PM

tile, wood or laminate for kitchen/foyer?
 
We are planning a kitchen remodel and are trying to choose a flooring.
Love the look & durabiluty of tile but am afraid it's too hard to stand on for long periods of cooking/baking, not to mention what happens when a dish or glass drops. Also, how easy is it to mop, espially the grout lines?
Love the look of laminate but can it safely go in a kitchen where spills and water will surely happen? Is it strong enough to roll the frig & stove in and out?
Love the look of wood, but again is it safe for a wet area?
There are kids, dogs, and lots of tracking in of mud, dirt & such. Anyone have any ideas? Anything new out there?

angus242 01-25-2009 09:51 PM

No flooring is perfect. They all have benefits and short-comings. I think overall, tile is the most durable. If installed properly with the correct materials, it will last the life of your house. Some people don't like the "cold" feel. I don't think the hardness should be a concern. Do you really think wood is "softer"?
Wood is simply beautiful. It can give your kitchen a classic, warm look. I wouldn't worry too much about water damage. If your kitchen gets enough water to damage a properly sealed hardwood floor, you have bigger problems. However, wood can be damaged (and repaired). You spoke of dropping a dish. That can gouge wood. It can be repaired but a new sand, stain & seal can be a disruption to your household.
Laminate would be my last choice. To me, it's the poor man's wood flooring. While it can be practical, I don't think it looks best. Easily cleanable but most susceptible to moisture damage.
My vote is for tile. But then again, I'm biased. :whistling2:

goldfam 01-25-2009 10:00 PM

Thanks, Angus.
Do you think a DIYer can do a proper tile install? How difficult is it to do a diagonal pattern? How about with a 2" dot detail?

JazMan 01-25-2009 10:02 PM

Easy choice
 
You've got kids, dogs and lots of mud? Game over.....get ceramic tile.

To make the floor even easier to maintain I suggest a rectified porcelain installed with an 1/8" grout line. Rectified tiles are flatter at the edge because they are ground down to make them very square...to rectify them. The tiles can therefore be set closer and the process reduces the curved edges so the grout is not as far below the surface. This makes cleaning easier since the dirty water is easier to remove while mopping.

You'll also chose a grout color that blends with the tiles and also hides dirt. You will apply a few coats of sealer every 5 years or so and you're good.:thumbsup:

Jaz

Floorwizard 01-26-2009 12:21 PM

Quote:

Some people don't like the "cold" feel. I don't think the hardness should be a concern. Do you really think wood is "softer"?
Yes it is. Your bones will notice more than your brain immediately. But that does not mean you should go wood. Tile is by no means a no-brainer as some would suggest. I have had elderly or people with leg problems (bones) and people who have arthritis in the hands who would be pissed if I suggested tile.
But in most cases tile is best with durability and water proof. Mats can be used in places you stand often to soften it a bit. And cleaning is not terrible if you seal the grout.
It is not as DIY friendly as some woods and lams, so hiring a pro with something as specific as tile is usually a must.

Chemist1961 01-26-2009 01:12 PM

Poor Man
 
Given all the negative feed back on this site on accidental moisture causing issues with laminate, I have steered clear in the foyer and kitchen I HAVE 3 KIDS AND A WATER DISPENSER ON THE FRIDGE...etc.

I did however stumble across a huge deal on Pergo cherry with underlay and did my family room and dining room for less than .70 a foot:yes:. But it's cool on bare feet in the morning and now we're shopping for an area rug.

Either way even it it gives me a few yeras to figure out other renos it was cheaper than cheap carpet and the cherry looks really good almost authentic grain.

angus242 01-26-2009 01:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Floorwizard (Post 219382)
Yes it is. Your bones will notice more than your brain immediately. But that does not mean you should go wood. Tile is by no means a no-brainer as some would suggest. I have had elderly or people with leg problems (bones) and people who have arthritis in the hands who would be pissed if I suggested tile.
But in most cases tile is best with durability and water proof. Mats can be used in places you stand often to soften it a bit. And cleaning is not terrible if you seal the grout.
It is not as DIY friendly as some woods and lams, so hiring a pro with something as specific as tile is usually a must.

I didn't mean tile is literally as soft as hardwood. That's why I put softer in quotes. To the average person, I don't think there's a big enough difference for that to sway them one way or the other.
Cost, durability, maintenance and installation should be some of the factors that help you choose a material. Like I said, no one flooring is going to be perfect.

Floorwizard 01-26-2009 01:36 PM

Quote:

Like I said, no one flooring is going to be perfect.
That's the truth

Quote:

To the average person, I don't think there's a big enough difference for that to sway them one way or the other.
I completely agree. I just wanted to make sure we speak to both people.
Not sure who is reading this.
How do we know they are average?
Just want to cover all the bases....

Good stuff though. Thanks for your input.

LoneStarGuitar 01-27-2009 10:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by goldfam (Post 219181)
Thanks, Angus.
Do you think a DIYer can do a proper tile install? How difficult is it to do a diagonal pattern? How about with a 2" dot detail?

In order:
Yes,
not very,
explain please.

I DIY'ed the tile in my parents house with my dad 15 years ago, and it is still looking quite nice.

Diagonal: it is a snap. Find the center of the room with chalk lines snapped on each diagonal. Now snap a line across the X cutting the X in half. Use this line as your center line and build off of it.

check out the pic. this method works for me pretty well. I am not a contractor, so I do have the advantage of doing one row and letting it set overnight. I have a group of friends, and all of us purchased fixer-uppers all around the same time. I am the "go-to" guy in the bunch for tile... this method has worked pretty dang well, even though it does require a bit longer and a bit of measuring. Once that row has set, the rest goes very quickly, especially if you have a helper or two.
http://i42.tinypic.com/2yxnfid.jpg

goldfam 01-27-2009 10:55 PM

Oh, this is very helpful. Thanks Lonestar.
The dot detail is done by cutting the corners off of 4 intersecting tiles and inserting a coordinating tile.
We also have 2 stairs and a curved landing to cover in the foyer. I think trying to tie in the pattern in both areas (that are joined by a 32" off-center door opening) is the challenge.
This is also a consideration in choosing tile vs. wood (we've ruled laminate out).

LoneStarGuitar 01-28-2009 12:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by goldfam (Post 220428)
Oh, this is very helpful. Thanks Lonestar.
The dot detail is done by cutting the corners off of 4 intersecting tiles and inserting a coordinating tile.
We also have 2 stairs and a curved landing to cover in the foyer. I think trying to tie in the pattern in both areas (that are joined by a 32" off-center door opening) is the challenge.
This is also a consideration in choosing tile vs. wood (we've ruled laminate out).


i understand now what you were referring to. WAAAAY too many cuts for me however, I agree that look is nice.

One consideration, wood is much easier to cut.. but there is always the potential for water damage. Oh, I believe somebody mentioned the stress hard surfaces can put on your feet... that is why rugs were invented! I also saw some designed to go in you kitchen, but were much nicer looking than the commercial kitchen stress relief mats. I think Bed Bath and Beyond stocks them


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