Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Flooring

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-05-2012, 12:00 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 2
Share |
Default

Is tile the answer? (to a moist subfloor)


We installed enginereed bamboo over slab about a year ago. It cupped almost immediately and recently began lifting. We ripped it all out.
Calcium chloride test came in with numbers from 8 to 11, with most areas being around 10.
We want to do large format (8x36) porcelain tiles with 1/16" grout lines. To meet up with our baseboards, it will require about 1/4" mudset. We have about 2500 sq ft to tile.
Do we need a moisture barrier? Is mold a concern? Is the moisture excessive for tile? or is it no big deal?
I'm having trouble getting consistent answers from local contractors and our home is supposed to be on a home tour (benefiting the local high school) in a month and a half!
Help!
Thanks,
John

iwrate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2012, 01:24 PM   #2
Tileguy
 
JazMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Troy, Michigan
Posts: 3,955
Default

Is tile the answer? (to a moist subfloor)


Hi John,

You've got a very damp floor there. Generally anything up to 3 is safe, 4-5 may be ok for carpeting, but 10 is very high. I doubt there's any floor covering that will work.

How many spots did you test? You should have tested in 4-5 areas to get a better idea of what's happening. Do you believe the test was done correctly?

I will check further to see if there are any membranes that might help. I doubt it. I recommend you give Schluter a call to see what they have to say about using Ditra. Tel.: 1-800-472-4588

Jaz

__________________
Tile 4 You LLC Troy, MI

DITRA Installs - KERDI Watertight-Mold-Free Showers. I have NEVER made a mistake, I thought I did ONCE, but, I was WRONG! A+ BBB rating - est. 1987 - over 50 yrs. exp.
JazMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2012, 01:34 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 25,604
Default

Is tile the answer? (to a moist subfloor)


Might be a good idea to take a look around outside and see if you can prevent some of the water from getting in.
Working gutters, grade sloping away from the house, no flower beds forming ponds, no mulch piled up againt the foundation.

Running a dehumidifier will go a long way to get the humity down.
joecaption is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2012, 02:56 PM   #4
liscenced electrician
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Oregon coast
Posts: 979
Default

Is tile the answer? (to a moist subfloor)


Where is the moisture coming from? Gutters? Ground water? Where do you live?
jimmy21 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2012, 03:02 PM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 2
Default

Is tile the answer? (to a moist subfloor)


We're not sure where the water is coming from. It could be ground water as grading and gutters are not an issue. I had a contractor that specializes in slab moisture problems come out and he couldn't find any external problems. We've also had a plumber come out and check for leaks and he didn't find anything (and only pipes to the kitchen island are below ground)

We did the calcium chloride tests in multiple places and (with the exception of the island - which was a 7.6) the results were in the 9-10 range.

I have done the diy test where you duct tape saran wrap to the concrete and check for moisture. Even after 72+ hours, there are no visible drops of water, but the concrete does feel slightly moist to the touch and there is a darker coloring.

Also, we're in Newport Beach, California.

Last edited by iwrate; 09-05-2012 at 03:06 PM. Reason: Add information
iwrate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2012, 09:50 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 345
Default

Is tile the answer? (to a moist subfloor)


Maybe consider acid staining the concrete. It's cheaper than most tiles, you can score tile patterns into it and it can be made to look like an expensive stone. Plus, I don't think moisture would effect it in anyway.
Awoodfloorguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2012, 10:36 PM   #7
Tileguy
 
JazMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Troy, Michigan
Posts: 3,955
Default

Is tile the answer? (to a moist subfloor)


I don't know of any product, be it paint, stain or any floor coverings including carpeting, that is recommended for a surface that tests out at 10 lbs/1,000 sq. ft. of moisture evaporation using (ASTM F710).

I just checked a Sherwin Williams concrete stain used in acid staining and it says;

Quote:
When to Apply: H&CŪ Concrete Stain
Water Based should be applied on to
a dry surface where moisture content
should not exceed 3lbs/1000 sq. ft. of
surface
If someone knows something different, let us know.

Jaz
__________________
Tile 4 You LLC Troy, MI

DITRA Installs - KERDI Watertight-Mold-Free Showers. I have NEVER made a mistake, I thought I did ONCE, but, I was WRONG! A+ BBB rating - est. 1987 - over 50 yrs. exp.
JazMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2012, 05:45 AM   #8
Doer of Many Things
 
poppameth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Staunton, VA
Posts: 1,160
Default

Is tile the answer? (to a moist subfloor)


When you are at that level and really want to install a floor covering you have to start examining moisture mitigation products. We've used one from Uzin extensively that handles massive amounts of moisture. It's not inexpensive and is a very involved process. You are looking at an epoxy prime coat, then a bonding primer, and lastly a self leveling compound to get you to a floor ready for covering that will be warrantied again moisture issues.
__________________
Darkling Designs
poppameth is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2012, 10:07 AM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Longview, Texas
Posts: 270
Default

Is tile the answer? (to a moist subfloor)


there are also tiles you can buy online that just snap together, and once installed it appears to be a normal wood/carpeted floor but it has space underneath the top covering, that is made of plastic so moisture doesnt affect it. They are primarily meant for a high-moisture spot, like a garage, but they would work for your house.
firsttimeremode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2012, 01:59 PM   #10
Tileguy
 
JazMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Troy, Michigan
Posts: 3,955
Default

Is tile the answer? (to a moist subfloor)


Quote:
Originally Posted by firsttimeremode
there are also tiles you can buy online that just snap together, and once installed it appears to be a normal wood/carpeted floor but it has space underneath the top covering, that is made of plastic so moisture doesnt affect it. They are primarily meant for a high-moisture spot, like a garage, but they would work for your house.
Wrong. From Snapstone instructions;
Quote:
Sub-floor must be clean, smooth, dry, and structurally sound
BTW, a garage under normal conditions does not have anywhere near this much moisture under/in the slab.

Jaz
__________________
Tile 4 You LLC Troy, MI

DITRA Installs - KERDI Watertight-Mold-Free Showers. I have NEVER made a mistake, I thought I did ONCE, but, I was WRONG! A+ BBB rating - est. 1987 - over 50 yrs. exp.
JazMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2012, 03:02 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Longview, Texas
Posts: 270
Default

Is tile the answer? (to a moist subfloor)


not talking about Snapstone. there is a product that moisture doesnt bother. i just saw it advertised on DIY network and i know ive seen it online. top side is usually carpet, bottom side is plastic. the DIY network episode was for a family that had this exact problem and this is what they used.
firsttimeremode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2012, 03:11 PM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Longview, Texas
Posts: 270
Default

Is tile the answer? (to a moist subfloor)


here is the link to what i was talking about. Water doesnt bother it. Good luck to you!

http://www.cartwheelfactory.com/plastic_decking.html
firsttimeremode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2012, 03:56 PM   #13
Tileguy
 
JazMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Troy, Michigan
Posts: 3,955
Default

Is tile the answer? (to a moist subfloor)


That product is not relevant to what John in this thread is talking about. John removed engineered bamboo cuz it cupped and wants to install porcelain tiles in his damp basement. That would not be an alternative for a basement floor.

Jaz
__________________
Tile 4 You LLC Troy, MI

DITRA Installs - KERDI Watertight-Mold-Free Showers. I have NEVER made a mistake, I thought I did ONCE, but, I was WRONG! A+ BBB rating - est. 1987 - over 50 yrs. exp.
JazMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2012, 04:02 PM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Longview, Texas
Posts: 270
Default

Is tile the answer? (to a moist subfloor)


i was just offering him an option, Jaz. These would work well and look very nice. Plus they install in no time. Maybe not porcelain but it is an option that is open to him.

firsttimeremode is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Travertine Tile Help MikeinTexas Flooring 1 09-07-2011 10:43 AM
Subfloor base for bathroom tile StevePax Remodeling 6 12-23-2009 09:41 AM
Subfloor for under tile petsparkle Kitchen & Bath Remodeling 1 04-12-2009 06:54 AM
help with choosing subfloor for bathroom tile red86yota Flooring 6 02-20-2009 09:49 AM
Removing Ceramic tile from subfloor Gerry Kiernan Flooring 4 06-06-2008 08:55 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.