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Old 06-28-2013, 01:32 AM   #16
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Subfloor thickness question


I recall travertine is a semi porous tile and the top needs to be sealed previous to installation or .You will stain it with the mortar and your fingers ,I am not 100% so you should find out , Been a few years since i laid travertine Then , I would take Some tiles ,walk around the floor , Lay that tiles in various places and try to figure out if you could lay them evenly , If the floor is too un even , Then you may want to think about a smaller tile that won't teeter totter on the high spot of the floor .

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Old 06-28-2013, 09:12 AM   #17
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Which isn't what they're asking. They'd already put that down in the bath and aren't looking to use it in the kitchen.

Teetering and high-spots is one issue with large formats, but I'd be more worried about lippage from uneven tiles. Getting rectified ones helps but you're still at the mercy of doing a very accurate job when laying them.
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Old 06-28-2013, 12:08 PM   #18
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Which isn't what they're asking. They'd already put that down in the bath and aren't looking to use it in the kitchen.

Teetering and high-spots is one issue with large formats, but I'd be more worried about lippage from uneven tiles. Getting rectified ones helps but you're still at the mercy of doing a very accurate job when laying them.
Bill.... Sorry did not understand... but why would rectified tile help with any lippage issue over an un-flat floor?

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Old 06-28-2013, 12:17 PM   #19
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Hmmm, I didn't even know what rectified tile was until it was mentioned here and I googled it.
Now I'm gonna insist on rectified tile because I want the teensiest grout line possible.
Not sure how rectified would help with an unlevel issues.
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Old 06-28-2013, 05:24 PM   #20
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I wasn't aware there was an issue with the floor not being level. There are ways to deal with that. Smaller tile is a quicker/less expensive way. Otherwise you'd get into using something like using self-leveling concrete to provide it.

I was pointing out that large formats present longer edges that might reveal issues, lippage being one. It's hard enough to get a whole bunch of BIG tiles all laid perfectly. It gets even worse when there's any variations in the tiles (as in, not rectified). Or varying thicknesses. But you've likely already dealt with this since you used large formats in the bath, right?
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Old 06-28-2013, 08:27 PM   #21
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I wasn't aware there was an issue with the floor not being level. There are ways to deal with that. Smaller tile is a quicker/less expensive way. Otherwise you'd get into using something like using self-leveling concrete to provide it.

I was pointing out that large formats present longer edges that might reveal issues, lippage being one. It's hard enough to get a whole bunch of BIG tiles all laid perfectly. It gets even worse when there's any variations in the tiles (as in, not rectified). Or varying thicknesses. But you've likely already dealt with this since you used large formats in the bath, right?
Indeed. It was a tough choice for a first tile job for sure. Hubby used these cool clip thingy's, and we ended up with as close to perfect as a couple of newbies could get. To our eye, we see a few spots that could have been better, but anyone who comes in oooh's and ahhhh's over the tile.
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Old 06-28-2013, 09:13 PM   #22
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Indeed. It was a tough choice for a first tile job for sure. Hubby used these cool clip thingy's, and we ended up with as close to perfect as a couple of newbies could get. To our eye, we see a few spots that could have been better, but anyone who comes in oooh's and ahhhh's over the tile.
Welcome to an inate truism of DIY.... or actually also DIP (Do iI as a Pro).

As a DIY, you'll always see some minor issue that no one else will ever see.... although the damn thing will always stand out to you.

As a DIP, I don't care how good you are, if you are a pro, you'll always see something that you could have done just a little bit better.

Good going... have fun with it

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Old 06-29-2013, 09:11 AM   #23
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Heh, that's the reason I avoid painting. My eye always gets drawn to the mistakes; like that roller that skipped onto the ceiling. Whereas if someone else does it, even if they make the same kind of mistake, I won't notice it every time.

I've read about the tile leveling schemes with clips. Glad to hear it worked for you.
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Old 06-29-2013, 11:02 AM   #24
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Heh, that's the reason I avoid painting. My eye always gets drawn to the mistakes; like that roller that skipped onto the ceiling. Whereas if someone else does it, even if they make the same kind of mistake, I won't notice it every time.

I've read about the tile leveling schemes with clips. Glad to hear it worked for you.

SO TRUE... BILL..... We're funny animals.

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Old 06-29-2013, 01:16 PM   #25
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Just do what I tell you and lay it out first before you freak out about everything , I am a pro, I do a fair amount of tile ....Rectified tile and special cuts and on and on ,. you could drive your self nuts . The mortar if mixed right will allow to adjust for slight differences in height , MIX the Mortar so when you turn the notched trowel sideways in the bucket the mortar holds and does not drain down ,Yes it will droop a little , But should be as if you wanted the tile to hold on a vertical wall , Which it won't with out a brace , But just get the mortar right and you can push some of the tiles down a little more than others Also , Rectified tile , I never heard of it , I heard of the uniformity grading , I forgot where that is written , But Just ask about it , Your going to drive yourself nuts , I repeat , Lay the tile dry run , and quit freakin . No Matter what it will teeter a little , I think you could get 1/8th out in thicknes , the grout line is what takes up for lack of uniformity , If you scrutinize all tile floors are not perfectly straight , You just never got down and lined up on the lines , There may well be a perfect floor , Maybe one I didn't check , Again and again the bet solution is tp dry lay the floor . Don't cut any tiles . Since no one has told you yet , There is only two ways to center tile , Snap a line down the center , Run the tile along side the line .Or with the line in the middle of the tile . There's a point where you git er done . The best way to start for an amateur is to dry lay , Don't cut in . Just dry lay . Then . If you are satisfied , Lay the uncut , You could lay the whole thing , Take a flat 4 or 6 inch paint scraper , Scrape all the excess mortar where the cuts will go in a couple days when it dries , The reason for an amateur to lay and let dry is , A pro can cut and lay fast as we go , You will be lucky to keep the tiles straight if you are working on or over them , Not trying to besmirch you as an amateur , But play it smart and get the majority straight and don't mess with them , Then cut the edges when it is good and dry ,And if you touch one , You won't push them out of straight or square

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