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Old 03-02-2008, 01:47 PM   #1
mcu
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Subfloor Recommendations/Opinions...which is best way to go?


Hi Guys,

I will be startng my personal subfloor this week and wanted you help choosing the way to do it on concrete for the basement.

1. OVRX/Dricore 2x2 tiles. The most expensive way, but only 1 1/8" thick. My concern is that since its not nailed down, I should install another 3/8 plywood to cross. Manufacturer says its not needed, but I am wondering if I should to make it more solid and level.

2. 1x3 (forence) base, nailed/screwed to concrete over asphalte paper, and hardwood nailed directly on it or over 5/8" plywood. Is it safe to nail directly on 1x3 or need plywood before? This is the cheapest way and loses the least headroom

3. Floating subfloor on 1" DOW XEPS blue insulation sheets, then two layers of 3/8 plywood crossed. This will be the warmest floor, and cost is between the other two, but also loses most headroom.

Please let me know your experiences and if anything here you would not touch. these are just techniques I saw while doing net searches.

I have been installing hardwood floors for a few years, but have seen so many techniques and not sure which are good and which are not.

Thanks!
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Old 03-03-2008, 04:32 PM   #2
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Subfloor Recommendations/Opinions...which is best way to go?


Does this space need to be heated?
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Old 03-03-2008, 05:07 PM   #3
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Subfloor Recommendations/Opinions...which is best way to go?


Quote:
Originally Posted by mcu View Post
Hi Guys,
I will be startng my personal subfloor this week and wanted you help choosing the way to do it on concrete for the basement.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcu View Post
I have been installing hardwood floors for a few years, but have seen so many techniques and not sure which are good and which are not.
Ok, I take it, that this means that you are planning on installing hardwood floor in a basement?
If so, I would not recommend that.
If you are deadset on installing something that looks like hardwood, in a basement, I'd suggest going with a laminate, or floating engineered wood. If doing so, I'd also still strongly suggest to make sure that moisture levels are acceptable, and that the proper vapor barrier is installed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcu View Post
1. OVRX/Dricore 2x2 tiles. The most expensive way, but only 1 1/8" thick. My concern is that since its not nailed down, I should install another 3/8 plywood to cross. Manufacturer says its not needed, but I am wondering if I should to make it more solid and level.
It is not advised by the manufacturer that you install a hardwood on their product in below grade locations (basement/cellars).

http://www.dricore.com/en/dinstal.aspx:
"Engineered Hardwood Flooring - Only install wood flooring finishes approved for use below grade. We do not recommend that solid hardwood floors be installed below grade."

In addition, Dicore flooring "floats", thus a similar, floating-type flooring material (laminate, engineered floating, carpet, etc) are the suggested type finished flooring, to be installed in below grade applications.

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2. 1x3 (forence) base, nailed/screwed to concrete over asphalte paper, and hardwood nailed directly on it or over 5/8" plywood. Is it safe to nail directly on 1x3 or need plywood before? This is the cheapest way and loses the least headroom
Again, I do not suggest installing hardwood in a basement environment.

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Originally Posted by mcu View Post
3. Floating subfloor on 1" DOW XEPS blue insulation sheets, then two layers of 3/8 plywood crossed. This will be the warmest floor, and cost is between the other two, but also loses most headroom.
I know that you are considering this type of subfloor, again, for installing hardwood, which I do not recommend...


If you are deadset on a geniune hardwood look. Consider this:

1.) Application of drylok on concrete floor.
2.) Application of a 4 to 6 mil Poly.
3.) Installation of Dricore.
4.) Taping over of dricore seams with Tyvek Tape.
5.) Installation of a floating engineered hardwood (not nailed, not glued = floating).

Something to consider: Engineered Hardwood is more dimensionally stable than solid hardwood, due to it's manufacturing process, this makes it ideal for installation in basements, where a wood-look finished floor is desired.

http://homerepair.about.com/od/inter...lr_intro_3.htm: "This construction technique results in a wood floor that is more stable than a solid wood floor. Stable meaning the floor is less susceptible to shrinkage and expansion movement due to fluctuations in humidity or temperature. These floors are also able to be installed directly over concrete and may be installed in below grade applications unlike solid wood floors."

Also reference: http://www.bellawood.com/custserv/ab...ame=Engineered

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 03-03-2008 at 05:14 PM.
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Old 03-03-2008, 08:22 PM   #4
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Subfloor Recommendations/Opinions...which is best way to go?


yes this space will be heated
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Old 04-19-2008, 11:41 AM   #5
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Subfloor Recommendations/Opinions...which is best way to go?


Hi there,

1. "It is not advised by the manufacturer that you install a hardwood on their product in below grade locations (basement/cellars)"

==> Hardwood flooring is not recommended to be installed on such subfloor because nails & tacks won't be fixed as well as they would be in plywood sheets. BUT if you install plywood on top of Dricore 24x24 then you solve that problem (be sure to do what is written next prior to attach plywood on top of Dricore tiles). But since Dricore system is a floating subfloor when installed alone, meaning that it will expland and retract with temperature, I strongly recommend to install those tile with a 1/16" space in between each squares and make a silicone seal between. You can also fix few tiles to the concrete slab on the perimeter to fix the subfloor permanently making it "non floating". That way you will have the great advantage of the insulation space between concrete slab and subfloor, a perfect vapor barrier and a perfect base for any kind of flooring system.

I personally plan to do the very same in my basement but if I have choice between engineering hardwood and hardwood, I'll take engineering for stability and moisture resistance. But if I cannot find the wood I want to match my stairways and upper level flooring, then I'll use hardwood flooring.

IF humidity might be a big factor because of basement specifications, then consider installing a humidity controller in your basement and no moreproblemmay occur while you enjoy your hardwood for years to come.


2. "1x3 (forence) base, nailed/screwed to concrete over asphalte paper, and hardwood nailed directly on it or over 5/8" plywood. Is it safe to nail directly on 1x3 or need plywood before? This is the cheapest way and loses the least headroom"

==> THIS IS THE WORST THING TO DO!!!! You are exposing hardwood directly to concrete slab humidity that might passes thru asphalte paper and there will be. Just a year and you will see the disaster in your floor warping.


3. "Floating subfloor on 1" DOW XEPS blue insulation sheets, then two layers of 3/8 plywood crossed. This will be the warmest floor, and cost is between the other two, but also loses most headroom."

==> I am very concern about what will happen if ever there is water infiltration in the basement. How will you find out? How water will affect the whole floor? How will you repair?


These are my advices from my experience and knowledge so far!

Lucas_Mtl :o)
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