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-   -   Snap, crackle, pop...PERGO flooring!!! (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/snap-crackle-pop-pergo-flooring-161514/)

georgiabird 10-29-2012 12:50 PM

Snap, crackle, pop...PERGO flooring!!!
 
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Hi guys. It's me again still trying to unravel the mess the con-artist carpenter left us with.

My next problem is this: We paid him to level our kitchen floor (concrete slab). He used leveling compound but he only poured it in spots and we ended up with more humps and bumps than we started with.

Then, we had purchased allure flooring to go on the floor. He tried to put it on the foundation with no luck and trashed about $500.00 worth of flooring. We then switched to Pergo, and he layed that. But the Pergo cannot lay correctly with more than a 1/4" variation in the slab. When he realized he had also screwed up the Pergo is when he skipped out...and never came back.

My question is this: Can we pull up the Pergo and pay someone to level the floor and then relay the same pieces back down? (assuming they are not cracked)?

Thank you for any feedback! The snap and pop of these boards is driving us all crazy.

-Julie

georgiabird 10-29-2012 12:52 PM

If you look at where the floor hits my cabinets, you can see the ripple of the uneven boards. He also never put our shoemolding back down.

joecaption 10-29-2012 12:57 PM

Just from what I can see in the picture there's also no expantion gap.

zakany 10-29-2012 02:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by georgiabird (Post 1040284)
My question is this: Can we pull up the Pergo and pay someone to level the floor and then relay the same pieces back down? (assuming they are not cracked)?

Yes, you can. Especially since joe is right - you have a little too much flooring on the floor.

joecaption 10-29-2012 03:03 PM

That's one way to put it. lol
Like the time I had to go back and tell a lady that was over 200 lb. and only 5' tall she had been turned down for life insurance.
I told her if she was 7' tall and her weight she would have been excepted.

Guess he was trying to cut down on the scrap flooring.

JetSwet 10-29-2012 03:48 PM

Is it that there are no expansion or the floor isn't flat?....

joecaption 10-29-2012 03:59 PM

Sure would account for at least some of the problum.
So much for a floating floor.

RWCustom 10-30-2012 04:29 AM

Nearly every laminate floor manufacturer recommends at least a 1/4" expansion gap around the perimeter, and if you have any runs that extend over 40 feet they may also want you to add in another "mid room" expansion joint. The expansion joint allows the flooring to expand and contract with the seasons without buckling or warping. The installation instructions that come packaged in each carton of material should have this information readily available to you. If it doesn't then look up the installation instructions on the manufacturers official website.

As long as the locking mechanism isn't damaged and the individual planks are flat and true you can most likely reuse most of your floor.

Also, I hate to even say this... but here goes. Depending on what type/brand of self leveling material he used he may have needed to prime the underlying concrete first to get maximum adhesion. If you're going to tear out your floor anyway you might want to make sure that he properly prepared the slab for the self leveler.

Is there a good vapor barrier, properly installed, beneath all of your laminate flooring? This is absolutely critical.

If you are going to have someone properly self level your concrete substrate and reinstall the laminate then have them install maybe 60-80 square feet and then you can walk around on it and see if the noise is gone. No sense having someone install the whole floor again if it's still crackling and popping with every step. The flatter the floor the less strain it puts on the joints, which means less strain/friction/movement, and significantly less sound. Oh yeah, speaking of end joints, you don't want any of the end joints to be within 6" of each other anywhere in your floor. This makes for a much stronger and more stable floor.

Good luck with your project.


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