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Old 01-24-2012, 09:44 AM   #1
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Slab that will not dry out


We had a plumbing leak. It has been fixed and rerouted throught the roof and there is no more leak. My son's room backs up to the bathroom that had the leak. We ripped up his carpet and noticed lime build up on the slab due to the moisture coming up through the slab. We cleaned all of that off.. then did two coats of bleach/water. The past three days we have been drying his room with professional fans and dehumidifiers. We kept totes on the concrete in different areas in the room to test the concrete to see if it is holding water under objects sitting on the slab- and it was. So within the three days of testing we have been moving totes around and still damp under. The fans/dehumidifiers have been removed and the totes have stayed. We have noticed that it is still getting damp under the totes, but not as bad as it was before. Almost like its drying up, but taking a while. We have also noticed some damp spots in our daughters room which backs up to her brothers room. At this point we are not sure if we should go ahead and let it dry out naturally for a month before reflooring the areas? or if we should seal the concrete and put flooring down. We were told not to put sealer down because if slab was still wet it would push the moisture to other areas in the house, and to put breathable flooring down- like carpet, tile or natural stone. I don't want to do the carpet because I feel like I would have the same problem as before (damp carpet feeling). But i'm afraid to do tile and the slabe still have moisture and have a damp residue on the tile and it be slippery. I also heard if you dont seal the slab and put breathable flooring down that it would dry out on its own with time... i would hate to spend the money and have to refloor in a year because of mold/mildew?? any suggestions on how to dry out the slab or what we should do would be greatly appreciated.. thanks!

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Old 01-24-2012, 11:25 AM   #2
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Slab that will not dry out


Keep a dehumidifier going all the time.

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Old 01-24-2012, 02:04 PM   #3
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Slab that will not dry out


We always have dehumidifiers going in our basement, instead of having to empty them we have them hardlines to drain pipes to the sump pump. You should do the same. You will find there is an endless amount of moisture in the basement. I am about to put flooring down in my basement, and I am curious as to what options I have besides carpeting. Subscribed
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Old 01-24-2012, 02:11 PM   #4
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Slab that will not dry out


Carpet would be one of my last choises in a basement. Tile, engineered hardwood, shet linolium, glued down linolum tiles.
And you right if the floors still wet leave it open.
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Old 01-24-2012, 02:14 PM   #5
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Slab that will not dry out


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Carpet would be one of my last choises in a basement. Tile, engineered hardwood, shet linolium, glued down linolum tiles.
And you right if the floors still wet leave it open.
What is wrong with carpet?

How resilient is engineered hardwood to water? My basement has had several water problems and the carpet has held up fine, granted we shop vacuumed it out pretty quickly, and we use the dehumidifiers.
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Old 01-24-2012, 02:36 PM   #6
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Slab that will not dry out


Carpet will breathe and let the moisture dry out. Some of the other floor coverings won't.
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Old 01-24-2012, 02:37 PM   #7
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Slab that will not dry out


If you have vapor barrier under the concrete and interior drain tile, it is a different world. building on a sugar sand hill is also great for dry basement.

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Old 01-24-2012, 02:52 PM   #8
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Slab that will not dry out


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If you have vapor barrier under the concrete and interior drain tile, it is a different world. building on a sugar sand hill is also great for dry basement.

Dick
What is a sugar sand hill? I am assuming sugar sand is sand the consistency of sugar, but what would this have to do with a basement?
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Old 01-24-2012, 04:29 PM   #9
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Slab that will not dry out


Lavid -

Sugar sand is uniform well drained sand (usually spherical, not angular particles) that has minimal fines and drains very well. In some areas, it is a common occurrence.

If you are on a hill, the sand will be very dry and any moisture will percolate away. Therefore, is it the ideal for dry basement, but a vapor barrier under the slab is a smart and cheap investment.

Dick
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Old 01-24-2012, 04:34 PM   #10
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Slab that will not dry out


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Lavid -

Sugar sand is uniform well drained sand (usually spherical, not angular particles) that has minimal fines and drains very well. In some areas, it is a common occurrence.

If you are on a hill, the sand will be very dry and any moisture will percolate away. Therefore, is it the ideal for dry basement, but a vapor barrier under the slab is a smart and cheap investment.

Dick
When you talk about a vapor barrier under a slab, I think you are talking about the slab on concrete that makes up his basement floor, in which case, he couldn't alter this now as it is something that would have had to be installed when the slab was poured right? The barrier keeps water from seeping through the concrete?

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