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badhaircut 01-23-2013 03:10 PM

Shower tiles fell off, water damaged wall
 
Hey all I have a bit of a problem with my shower... I noticed today that two tiles were coming loose on my shower wall so I pulled them off. They came off quite easilly but I noticed that the wall behind the tiles has some water damage. I'm not even sure if dense shield was used.

The previous owner was an elderly woman and she had someone install a shower bar for her. My guess is that when they installed the bar, they popped the tile off and water seeped in slowly.
I don't have any extra tile which rely sucks so I'm going to have to shop around to see if I can find a match. Every 6x6 white wall tile I see is much thicker.
The water damage doesnt seem to go past the two tiles and there is no sign of mold.

I'm posting some pictures of the damage and would appreciate any help getting this fixed from start to finish. I'm a tiling newbie btw.


PS: can a mod please move this to tiling, Thanks

http://s9.postimage.org/i8ve18ghn/IMG_2817.jpg
http://s13.postimage.org/g3pxw6tur/IMG_2816.jpg

http://postimage.org/image/i8ve18ghn/

JazMan 01-23-2013 03:33 PM

Hi badhaircut,

Looks like you're dealing with a bad tile job too.:yes: You got a typical hack job, drywall, and mastic. Works fine in a dry area.

You need to rip it out and start over using waterproof methods. For a temporary fix, just slap some adhesive on the back of the new tiles, grout or caulk, and hope 'till you're ready to remodel.

Jaz

badhaircut 01-23-2013 04:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JazMan (Post 1100276)
Hi badhaircut,

Looks like you're dealing with a bad tile job too.:yes: You got a typical hack job, drywall, and mastic. Works fine in a dry area.

You need to rip it out and start over using waterproof methods. For a temporary fix, just slap some adhesive on the back of the new tiles, grout or caulk, and hope 'till you're ready to remodel.

Jaz


Thanks for replying. There are chunks of drywall missing now. How should I go abouts fixing the damaged drywall? should I remove the surrounding tiles and replace say an 18"x18" piece of drywall?

oh'mike 01-23-2013 05:14 PM

Leave the drywall as it is---use silicone caulk to stick on the new tiles---good strong waterproof glue---tape may be needed for 24 hours.

JazMan 01-23-2013 05:19 PM

That's one way. You'll know better once you remove enough tiles to get to good wallboard. You'll have to remove more tiles than you now think cuz you'll also have to tape the seams.

I wouldn't use drywall though. Get a sheet of 1/2" concrete backer and thinset mortar, (powder)

Jaz

joecaption 01-23-2013 06:17 PM

That's your probulm, drywall never should have been used.
If he did that poopy a job I'd bet the grout never got sealer.
Gout is not water proof.

oh'mike 01-23-2013 07:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JazMan (Post 1100346)
That's one way. You'll know better once you remove enough tiles to get to good wallboard.
I wouldn't use drywall though. Get a sheet of 1/2" concrete backer and thinset mortar, (powder)

Jaz

The wall may end up without any tile at all----:laughing:

gregzoll 01-23-2013 08:09 PM

Looks like a new tub surround along with a bath remodel are in order, for a new project this year. Only thing you can do temp, if it is not the wall the shower head is on, is use a shower curtain to protect the wall. If it is the back wall behind the shower head, you will have to tack the curtain up to protect the wall, until you can get around to getting the materials and time to do the work.

gregzoll 01-23-2013 08:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1100376)
That's your probulm, drywall never should have been used.
If he did that poopy a job I'd bet the grout never got sealer.
Gout is not water proof.

My bet is that it is Gyprock, if that is a old home.

badhaircut 01-23-2013 09:38 PM

So upon further inspection err tile removing... it looks like they did use green board which is a relief. Green board is for bathrooms correct? I should mention that the house is 15 years old and the builder installed the tiles so I'm assuming it was done right because they are a pretty reputable builder in this area. It looks like whoever installed the shower bar didn't realize that eventually water would work its way behind the tile, maybe they could have caulked around the flange ad screws?

So I picked up some tiles which are very close to what I need, they are about 3/16" shorter than the existing tiles but I think I can make them work if I space them out a bit. I plan to remove 9 tiles in the area of the damage, cut out the old wetboard, and replace it with a new piece of wetboard or cement board.
I only need this fix to last me until the summer when I plan to remodel the bathroom.
Any thoughts?

gregzoll 01-23-2013 09:49 PM

That should work. I would get the materials now since it is Winter, and usually prices are lower during this time. Also keep your eyes out for clearance prices on fixtures, etc. We ended up shopping around between Lowe's, Home Depot, Menard's hardware stores, and got our vanity through a Ready To Assemble website.

I do not even want to say what it cost in my labor to do the work over a 6 week period. Our main concern when we did our bath, was get the shower done first, because we ran into the same thing as you did. Water got behind the tiles, rotted out the Gyprock, and from there it cascaded into one huge headache at 5pm on a Saturday night. Took until Monday Night to get the shower back up and running. We cheated and instead of tiling, just used one of the five piece surrounds, since it was a case of "have to get it back up and running now".

JazMan 01-23-2013 10:36 PM

Badhaircut,

You made a few assumptions that are not correct. I'd like to talk about those for your future remodel and for others reading this.

Quote:

So upon further inspection err tile removing... it looks like they did use green board which is a relief.
No cause for any relief because of the green board. GB is not waterproof or even water resistant and should never be used in wet areas. It's often used on the "regular" walls in a bathroom, but it's not that great for that either.

Quote:

I should mention that the house is 15 years old and the builder installed the tiles so I'm assuming it was done right because they are a pretty reputable builder in this area.
If using GB and mastic for a wet wall were considered reputable, we're all in big trouble. :huh: It's what we call "cheap a**" builder, who cuts corners where ever he can get away with it.

Those look like 6x6 tiles from here. I'm surprised you couldn't find anything closer in size. But fine, who's gonna see it?

Quote:

I plan to remove 9 tiles in the area of the damage, cut out the old wetboard, and replace it with a new piece of wetboard or cement board.
Again, I know you now know, but you do not have wetboard, it's not much better than regular drywall and it's not as stiff.

Regardless, the repair should last long enough to meet your plans.:thumbsup:

Jaz

jeffnc 01-24-2013 04:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by badhaircut (Post 1100530)
So upon further inspection err tile removing... it looks like they did use green board which is a relief. Green board is for bathrooms correct? I should mention that the house is 15 years old and the builder installed the tiles so I'm assuming it was done right because they are a pretty reputable builder in this area.

Greenboard is for bathrooms in general, but never behind tile in a wet area. Drywall should never be exposed to actual water. Looks like they did it wrong.

badhaircut 01-24-2013 10:58 AM

Here's the hole I ended up with
http://s14.postimage.org/xdel8qe8t/IMG_2832.jpg

Jaz I took your advice and will use cement board instead of greenboard. I was wondering though, with these new tiles I'm installing which are a tad smaller than the existing ones.... The old grout joint is very small, about 1/16". I will have to make the new grout joints about 1/4" wide, will this be too large of a joint for a shower?
Also if you can guide me in the direction of a material list that I will need I would be greatly appreciated! ie: glue type, grout type, sealer etc

Thanks

JazMan 01-24-2013 03:29 PM

To do the job the right way you'd have to remove all the tiles surrounding the hole. You might be able to save the corners, but you should remove at least 12 more tiles. But..........

Since you're just applying a band-aide, you can get away with just slipping some more wood to fasten too and hope. After the new board is screwed in, glue the edges so it'll bond to the old wallboard. Let dry overnight, then bond the tiles. Let dry, then caulk the perimeter, cuz it'll likely crack with grout, and either caulk the rest or grout the rest.

I would look further for the right size tiles, 1/4" joints with bright glazed wall tiles would look hideous even if they were all that way. Your choice, it's not gonna last anyway.

list of materials;

the board, screws, thinset mortar - comes in #50 bags, YIKES, or 1 qt. of mastic, or just use adhesive/caulk, caulk, grout, (sanded if wider than 1/8"), Sealer is for the grout but has nothing to do with waterproofing it. Sealer does NOT make it waterproof. Use sealer as a maintenance item to make grout easier to clean. If you're really just looking for a temp fix, this should do it.

Jaz


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