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Mikon 10-09-2007 09:52 AM

sealing cutback adhesive
 
Is there any paint/primer that will stick to cutback adhesive residue? I removed the 9x9 tiles from our furnace room because they were chipped and looked crappy. All I really would like to do is coat the floor with some floor paint to clean it up and seal it. Thanks

jmancine 10-15-2007 12:47 PM

Yikes. You probably want to make sure you didn't just stir up a whole mess of asbestos fibers in your basement.

It may not be the best solution, but when I had to deal with chipping VAT's in my basement I poured self leveling concrete over it all to encapsulate the asbestos and not have to worry about the asbestos tiles or the cutback adhesive underneath.

I also got a nice smooth level floor out of the deal.

Mikon 10-16-2007 02:57 PM

No danger of asbestos, I used a heat gun to soften the tile, and carefully popped them off intact. This room is my furnace room, and also houses the water heater, so SLC might be a real pain. I have a second room that I want to do under my stairs, and the SLC might be a good option there. What type of prep did you do before laying down the concrete? I've never used the stuff before, what's the consistency like?
Thanks

jmancine 10-17-2007 10:08 AM

There are probably more detailed posts about SLC, but here's a basic rundown of my DIY experience (which is only one basement and a small corner in a kitchen!)

The prep is simply sweeping and vacuuming, then applying a latex primer to the tile/concrete. I used one that claimed to be a special primer for SLC applications.

I'd guess that primer would adhere to the cutback, but I really don't know...someone else might have an answer for that one. The best way to find out would be to get a small inexpensive can of latex primer and test it.

The SLC is mixed from dry form, so you control the consistency. The directions I followed said to mix to "milkshake" consistency -- not very scientific, but it works fine. As long as it is mixed thin enough to run and seek its own level it works. Start pouring in the lowest spot and let it run as far as it will go, then clean up the edge with a trowel.

Easier than it sounds since the SLC sets in about 10 minutes. You have to work fast once you start mixing it. Also, make sure to mix enough the first time! It proved difficult to pour and smooth out fresh stuff onto partially set stuff...

Sounds like your biggest hassle might be the hot water heater and furnace. Mine were already raised up on cement pads, fortunately.

Good luck!


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