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-   -   Screen and Recoat correct way to go? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/screen-recoat-correct-way-go-60700/)

pktrocket85 12-31-2009 09:15 PM

Screen and Recoat correct way to go?
 
Long story short just moved in with my gf. Her hardwood floors are some form of maple. I was going to restain the floors but thought otherwise. This will be my first time doing this type of project. My test room is our bedroom where the king size bed takes up the majority of the room.

1. I tested all the floors in the house with drops of water. All of the rooms beaded up the drop of water for about 10mins. From this information, I am assuming that the ureathane is still holding up well.
2. This is when I decided to do a screen and recoat.
3. My Plan
a. Shop vac the whole room
b. Seal off the air flow
c. Clean the floor and room with TSP
d. Renting a square buff sander from HD. Screen sanding the floor.
e. Shop vac again, getting up all the dust
f. Use a tac cloth until no more dust residue
g. Apply first coat of water based urathane

My questions are: What screen grit should I start with on the floor? Do I work from 80 to 120 grit screen then apply first coat? Is my plan on track or should I start over?

Any advice or words of wisdom would be appreciated. Thanks.

Jason

Bob Mariani 01-01-2010 07:41 AM

it will work if the floor indeed does not have significant scratches. You may not be seeing them until you apply a new coat. Wipe the floor with mineral spirits. This will show what it will look like with a new coat. If not acceptable you will need to use a sander, not just the screening

pinwheel45 01-01-2010 08:02 AM

For some reason, what you're wanting to do just feels like your going to have failure.I don't have a ton of experience with water based finishes, but I did attend a seminar on recoating with water based finish. The recomendations of that seminar were to use a bonding agent when recoating over polyurethane or aluminum oxide with water borne finish.

If you decide to go with oil based finish, I'll be able to offer a lot more advice. I've got a lot of experience to draw from there.



Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Mariani (Post 374711)
it will work if the floor indeed does not have significant scratches. You may not be seeing them until you apply a new coat. Wipe the floor with mineral spirits. This will show what it will look like with a new coat. If not acceptable you will need to use a sander, not just the screening


Mineral spirits & water based finish are not a good combination. I do exactly what you desribe to give clients an idea of what they're floor will look like, but I use oil based finish.

pktrocket85 01-01-2010 04:08 PM

I was going to use water based just because of odor and dry time. From reading, I may use oil because of the amount of time that you have to work with the product.

I would appreciate to hear what you know about applying the oil based poly and what would be the best process for me. Thanks.

ghio

IceT 03-19-2011 02:49 PM

I love Water and Oil.. just don't mix the two.

The water seems to be doing better over the time of having a floor down.


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