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-   -   Replacing Subfloor (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/replacing-subfloor-52110/)

whatispunk 09-01-2009 12:52 AM

Replacing Subfloor
 
So I just bought this house and I love it, but if I ever meet the people who built it... Suffice to say, it won't be pretty.

We had a month to reno/paint the place before moving in, but that's come and gone and now we're living in a disaster zone. The reason: my kitchen floor.

We ripped out all the cabinets and tore up the existing linoleum to reveal 3/8" particle board that had been glued down to the underlying 5/8" plywood subfloor. I tried for several hours to chip away at it, but only managed to remove about 3 feet and thoroughly damaged the subfloor in the process.

We really want to put in tile, but in hind sight if I had just laid some different linoleum and I'd be installing my cabinets by now. Oh well.

Sorry that this is so long winded, let me get down to my questions.

I've already started to rip out the subfloor. I chose the most difficult area first under the cantilevered bay window. The joists run perpendicular to the window and I've managed to cut (using a sawzall) flush to the sill plate. However, where the joists run parallel to the adjacent exterior walls I am concerned about cutting flush to the walls.

If the exterior face of the wall is resting on a joist, but the interior face is not, was the subfloor providing structural support? Do I need to install blocking? The wall is only 4 ft long before turning 90 and continuing through the living room (which won't be touched). The other adjacent wall runs the entire length of the kitchen, is parallel to the joists, and the interior face is maybe 2-3 inches from the nearest joist. This wall will be underneath the cabinets so I could likely cut down the middle of the joist and leave the 2-3 inches of the old subfloor along the edge. But I'd prefer to just remove it all. However, installing blocking or sistering a joist here probably won't happen as I have no room to reach in between joist and the wall.

So that's the first question. The other ones are simpler.

Where I've cut the subfloor out it appears that the acoustic sealant under the vapour barrier is flaking off. I don't want to remove the drywall so I did my best to re-seal it with some more acousti-seal. The vapour barrier in the basement was done poorly as well, can I wait until the subfloor is installed and attach the basement vb to the bottom of it?

And final question, I sure hope you've read this far, and I have been somewhat coherent. I am using 3/4" T&G plywood with 1/4" Easyboard. Will this be enough for the tile? They are 13"x13" ceramic tiles. Has anyone worked with Easyboard before? It sounds like an amazing product, but I'm not sure if it counts toward the recommended 1" thickness for tile? Do I need to install 1/4" ply on top of the subfloor and then install the Easyboard?

Sorry, I am a major novice at this. Please help. I don't want to pay professionals for this, as it seems like a pretty straight forward job. I just need a bit of direction.

Cheers.

Bud Cline 09-01-2009 09:50 PM

WOW, that's too long for me to read but I'll jump in with the tile stuff.:)

Quote:

I am using 3/4" T&G plywood with 1/4" Easyboard. Will this be enough for the tile?
I heard Easy Board had been pulled from the market. That is a brand new product this year and I wouldn't trust it at this time. Use one of the proven tile backers that has been around for years.

Quote:

not sure if it counts toward the recommended 1" thickness for tile?
"Recommended one inch"??? Where does that come from? The recommended minimum has always been 1-1/8" - 1-1/4", never less than that. And keep in mind that is a MINIMUM.


Quote:

Do I need to install 1/4" ply on top of the subfloor
No, 1/4" plywood is forbidden in any tile installation. The entire tile installation industry poo-poohs the use of any 1/4" plywood, 3/8" is the absolute minimum there.:)


Quote:

I don't want to pay professionals for this, as it seems like a pretty straight forward job
And as you can see this is not the case. I wouldn't underestimate the knowledge it takes to properly install a long lasting tile floor. It isn't always as simple as the Big Box Stores want you to think it is.:wink:


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