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-   -   Removing carpet pad and paint from hardwood floors (http://www.diychatroom.com/f5/removing-carpet-pad-paint-hardwood-floors-20766/)

Rahci 05-08-2008 12:05 AM

Removing carpet pad and paint from hardwood floors
 
What chemicals and tools would make the job of removing old stuck on carpet pad off of hardwood floors a bit easier? Also, there is white paint on the boards as well. Is there anything that would facilitate the removal of these things so I can refinish this floor the way it ought to be? Well, I know it is going to be lots of work no matter what, but I'm just looking for suggestions to make things go a little faster and a little easier if possible. Thank you!

Changeling 05-08-2008 03:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rahci (Post 121727)
What chemicals and tools would make the job of removing old stuck on carpet pad off of hardwood floors a bit easier? Also, there is white paint on the boards as well. Is there anything that would facilitate the removal of these things so I can refinish this floor the way it ought to be? Well, I know it is going to be lots of work no matter what, but I'm just looking for suggestions to make things go a little faster and a little easier if possible. Thank you!

Rachi, I don't know about the carpet pad stuck to the boards, I have the same problem myself only it is stuck to sheet vinyl flooring.

However "IF" the paint is Latex you can remove it easily with a product from Valspar called "GOOF OFF 2". The Goof Off 2 might remove the rug pad from the wood floor also, but I've never tried it this way.

Good luck.

Bud Cline 05-08-2008 04:08 PM

"Detach". Available from a flooring supplier.:)

Termite 05-08-2008 04:08 PM

If you're planning to properly re-finish the floors, why worry about removing all the surface goo and paint? You need to sand the floor down to bare wood to be able to do a good re-finishing job, and the drum sander you rent for that will certainly cut right through anything on the floor's surface.

AndyH 05-08-2008 04:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 121865)
If you're planning to properly re-finish the floors, why worry about removing all the surface goo and paint? You need to sand the floor down to bare wood to be able to do a good re-finishing job, and the drum sander you rent for that will certainly cut right through anything on the floor's surface.


AMEN,

a couple of passes with that 20 grit, and trust me, it will come off.

Leah Frances 05-08-2008 06:45 PM

I had amazing success with wetting the carpet down with a mild solution of white vinegar and hot water. Don't ask me why I used it - I don't really know. I applied it, let it soak and the padding came up much easier.

The worst thing that happens is you kill some spiders. ;)

NateHanson 05-08-2008 10:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 121865)
If you're planning to properly re-finish the floors, why worry about removing all the surface goo and paint? You need to sand the floor down to bare wood to be able to do a good re-finishing job, and the drum sander you rent for that will certainly cut right through anything on the floor's surface.

If the house was built before 1978 then make sure you test for lead before you sand all that paint off into a billion tiny particles. They'll go to your brain and make you spudit.:huh:

Rahci 05-09-2008 08:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 121865)
If you're planning to properly re-finish the floors, why worry about removing all the surface goo and paint? You need to sand the floor down to bare wood to be able to do a good re-finishing job, and the drum sander you rent for that will certainly cut right through anything on the floor's surface.

Quote:

Originally Posted by AndyH (Post 121869)
AMEN,

a couple of passes with that 20 grit, and trust me, it will come off.

I would like to finish the floor with poly. So the sanding seems like the way to go. And I have thought about renting a machine. However, I was trying to save a buck, and avoid moving all the furniture at once. Figured I'd take my time to a certain extent. Of course, I do want to have a measure of speed compared to what I am doing now. Right now I am attempting to use my belt sander with 50 grit, (that was the coarsest i could find so far for it). I would like to make a little more progress than I am making now so I will look into renting a machine a bit more seriously now. A couple of questions: Will a drum sander smooth out a degree of unevenness in the boards in relation to one another? Also, I have nail heads to contend with, that is, flat headed nails, nailed in from the surface, some of which are sticking up just a bit. What is the best way to tap these back down with out damage to the boards, a nail set perhaps? One of those nail heads really tore up my sand paper once already!


Quote:

Originally Posted by NateHanson (Post 121937)
If the house was built before 1978 then make sure you test for lead before you sand all that paint off into a billion tiny particles. They'll go to your brain and make you spudit.:huh:

LOL. Would a dust mask protect you from this hazard? If not not how do you test for lead?

Thank you all for your suggestions!

Rahci 05-14-2008 01:16 PM

Just a bump to see if someone has an answer
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rahci (Post 122008)
I would like to finish the floor with poly. So the sanding seems like the way to go. And I have thought about renting a machine. However, I was trying to save a buck, and avoid moving all the furniture at once. Figured I'd take my time to a certain extent. Of course, I do want to have a measure of speed compared to what I am doing now. Right now I am attempting to use my belt sander with 50 grit, (that was the coarsest i could find so far for it). I would like to make a little more progress than I am making now so I will look into renting a machine a bit more seriously now. A couple of questions: Will a drum sander smooth out a degree of unevenness in the boards in relation to one another? Also, I have nail heads to contend with, that is, flat headed nails, nailed in from the surface, some of which are sticking up just a bit. What is the best way to tap these back down with out damage to the boards, a nail set perhaps? One of those nail heads really tore up my sand paper once already!




LOL. Would a dust mask protect you from this hazard? If not not how do you test for lead?

Thank you all for your suggestions!

(Also, how do you protect against lead exposure in the situation?)

ayeshaa 05-14-2008 01:52 PM

As of I know, if it is latex paint, it may still be possible, with a bit of water and elbow grease and a buffing pad or steel wool to soften and remove the paint. If it is oil paint, perhaps a hand scraper could remove it.

i remember someone told me about Varsol - it is available at most home improvement stores. It is great for floors and cabinets that are wood and have gunkie build up from old carpet, grease and age. be careful it is very flammable, but works great. It is also wonderful if you have expensive paint brushes, after you clean them dip in varsol, shake off excess and wrap in paper towel. Your bristles will stay nice and plyable

NateHanson 05-14-2008 01:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rahci (Post 122008)
I would like to finish the floor with poly. So the sanding seems like the way to go. And I have thought about renting a machine. However, I was trying to save a buck, and avoid moving all the furniture at once. Figured I'd take my time to a certain extent. Of course, I do want to have a measure of speed compared to what I am doing now. Right now I am attempting to use my belt sander with 50 grit, (that was the coarsest i could find so far for it). I would like to make a little more progress than I am making now so I will look into renting a machine a bit more seriously now. A couple of questions: Will a drum sander smooth out a degree of unevenness in the boards in relation to one another? Also, I have nail heads to contend with, that is, flat headed nails, nailed in from the surface, some of which are sticking up just a bit. What is the best way to tap these back down with out damage to the boards, a nail set perhaps? One of those nail heads really tore up my sand paper once already!




LOL. Would a dust mask protect you from this hazard? If not not how do you test for lead?

Thank you all for your suggestions!

You can have a lead testing contractor test it for you, or you can get home lead test kits at places like home depot.

I've always heard that you simply don't dry-sand lead paint. Using a stripper is the safer way because lead is only toxic when inhaled or ingested.

A paper dust mask won't protect you from anything except a bug flying up your nose. Those are useless and misleading because people think they're getting protected from something when they're wearing them. If you're working with anything that you need to keep out of your lungs you need a mask with a rubber face-cup that seals all around your face. What sort of cartridge it uses depends on the particular hazard you're exposed to.


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