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Westond 09-30-2013 02:09 AM

Remove tongue and groove or...
 
Howdy everyone. We are redoing our kitchen have all the demo done and an empty room and I'm looking for an opinion on our floor situation.

The house was built in 1940 and has the following floor setup:
wide (10"?) tongue and groove subfloor on a 45 degree angle to the floor beams -> tongue and groove hardwood (not finished) -> 2 layers of linoleum sheet.

The issue is that this floor is level to the adjacent rooms beautiful finished original hardwood floors. If I just remove all the linoleum I'll lose a little height difference, but still have to have a transition between the hardwood and kitchen.. Not ideal. So should I just pull up all the kitchen tongue and groove and then lay new hardwood on top of the 1940s subfloor? Or just pull the linoleum and deal with the height difference?

I can't just finish the ancient unfinished hardwoods in the kitchen either because they are pretty beat up and patched in with plywood in sections.

Any feedback would be most appreciated. Thanks everyone!!

gregzoll 09-30-2013 02:14 AM

I would pull the linoleum and deal with the height difference, if you can refinish the flooring underneath. Most likely you will find out that it was damaged over the years, and any substrate they used as adhesive for the linoleum, will be hard to sand off.

So most likely will have to go with option B. That is pulling it up and hoping that you can get the new floor to the same height as the existing dining and other rooms adjacent.

wkearney99 09-30-2013 11:16 AM

What's your planned flooring for the kitchen? I'd think that would be your starting point. First by making sure the framing that's present will properly handle whatever flooring you're planning. As in, tile or stone is a lot heavier than the wood/linoleum you had there, so the joists better be capable of handling it. Ceramic is the lightest, followed by porcelain and then stone (more or less).

Westond 09-30-2013 11:51 AM

The plan is some kind of floating floor. Probably Cork click lock or bamboo.. so not very heavy. Here is a picture of what was going on under the base cabinets. You can see the original 1940s subfloor.

http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i5...ouse/floor.jpg

gregzoll 09-30-2013 12:25 PM

I would be ripping that whole mess up, to the original sub-floor. As for the floating floor, remember that you will have to place exterior grade under where the cabinets go, since you are not going to be placing the flooring under the cabinets, just where the stove, dishwasher and fridge will be.

So take into account those areas, when you make your measurements for figuring on materials.

wkearney99 09-30-2013 12:37 PM

So leave the diagonal subfloor and then just lay down the appropriate thickness of plywood necessary to meet your requirements.

Westond 09-30-2013 01:58 PM

Thanks for the input guys.

So it sounds like the plan should be to get down to the original subfloor, place plywood where the cabinets will go, and then install the new flooring onto the old subfloor. Any recommendations on an underlayment to go onto this type of old subfloor?

gregzoll 09-30-2013 02:05 PM

Exterior grade Plywood, if just going to lay a wood flooring on top. If tile, use DensShield or DuRock.


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