Refinishing Maple Hardwood - Flooring - Page 2 - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Flooring

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-24-2009, 07:01 AM   #16
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 135
Rewards Points: 75
Default

refinishing maple hardwood


Quote:
Originally Posted by jaros bros. View Post
I hope you will check the old flooring finish AND the paint you will remove to check for lead based products. Having a pregnant wife nearby would be a terrible risk to take. You might want to read up on lead abatement. I know a lot of the old flooring finishes had lead in them.
The man came here looking for legit advice on how to tackle a project. Why do so many members here feel the need to scare people with things that more than likely don't apply to them? Could you please show us the documentation as to where old floor finishes had lead in them?

Speedster, can you post some pics of the floor? It would be easier to offer advice based on pictures as to what sander will work best.

As a rule, the multiple head sanders are foolproof. They're just extremely slow at removing finish & grinding down excess material. A drum sander is better suited to removing old finish, but you're right, you need a skilled hand as a rule. Some drum sanders are more forgiving than others. Go to a regular rental store, not a big box store & talk to them about equipment. The drum sanders I'd recommend renting would be something like an alto/clark EZ8 or something similar. They've got a handle that allows you to feather in & out of the cut. If you choose to go this route, let the paper do the work & don't expect the first cut to make the floor look perfect. 20 grit is for removing the majority of the finish. It's non clogging. 36 or 40 grit is for the major material removal. 60, 80 & 100 grits are for final smoothing. On maple, I'd go all the way to 100. Open grain woods like oak, you can get by with 80 grit.

As for finishes? I'm an oil based man myself. Far more forgiving as for laying a smooth finish IMO. Water borne really does take a skilled hand to prevent lap marks on the ends & turnarounds, especially if you're room has closets, hallways or other offsets to the main room. Once cured & degassed, water or oil will be safe for your pregnant wife to stay in the house. Typically, 2-3 days full cure for either one. Even though you're not smelling the water based finish, it's still degassing as it cures too.

Someone advised you to save your money & hire a professional for this job. My advice? If you can live with some imperfections in the job & like the satisfaction of doing things with your own hands, jump right in & keep asking questions. If you & your wife are really perfectionists about things of this nature, hire it out. But be sure to go look at some of the floor finishers work before you turn him loose on your floors. Not all floor finishers do a professional job.

Advertisement

pinwheel45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2009, 07:02 AM   #17
Remodeling Contractor
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Sandy Hook, CT
Posts: 3,590
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

refinishing maple hardwood


I did not say you do not need ventilation. But water based dries by evaporation. Thus the fumes dissipate rapidly. Oil will give off fumes for days.
Bob Mariani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2009, 07:17 AM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 489
Rewards Points: 250
Default

refinishing maple hardwood


http://www.askthebuilder.com/EM00004...Finishes.shtml

I just did a google search and picked the first one. People think lead safety is something to disregard. It's not bad for adults, but for babies and small children it can cause serious damage. Most DIYers don't know that. Older houses, such as the OPers have these lead paint and finishes. I know personally of several people that have had lead in their old floor finishes. You can get a tester at any local hardware store. Yes, I do think people should be scared. It is an often overlooked problem. So overlooked that the EPA is not requiring contractors to have certification for working in older houses.
__________________
Josh Jaros Remodeling in The Woodlands, Texas www.jarosbros.com
jaros bros. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2009, 07:42 AM   #19
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: WV
Posts: 294
Rewards Points: 258
Default

refinishing maple hardwood


I do appreciate you fellas bring the potential lead issue to my attention. It's something I didn't think of and didn't know existed. I'll get a test kit and check it before I dig into this job. With that being said, the house is 59 years old. Most likely the floors were finished in some type of varnish or shellac. Worst case scenario it has lead in it. I will then buy a good respirator and sand the old finish off down to the bare wood. At that point I'd be lead-free and then apply a poly finish. I guess in all actuality I'll be doing that anyway regardless of the presence of lead. Again to reiterate, all of this will be done without the presence of my wife. I'll be sure that she avoids the place during the sanding and refinishing phases of this project.
speedster1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2009, 08:02 AM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 135
Rewards Points: 75
Default

refinishing maple hardwood


Quote:
Originally Posted by jaros bros. View Post
http://www.askthebuilder.com/EM00004...Finishes.shtml

I just did a google search and picked the first one. People think lead safety is something to disregard. It's not bad for adults, but for babies and small children it can cause serious damage. Most DIYers don't know that. Older houses, such as the OPers have these lead paint and finishes. I know personally of several people that have had lead in their old floor finishes. You can get a tester at any local hardware store. Yes, I do think people should be scared. It is an often overlooked problem. So overlooked that the EPA is not requiring contractors to have certification for working in older houses.

Thanks for the info, learn something new everyday.
pinwheel45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2009, 10:02 AM   #21
Mold!! Let's kill it!
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,849
Rewards Points: 2,012
Default

refinishing maple hardwood


Quote:
Originally Posted by speedster1 View Post
I do appreciate you fellas bring the potential lead issue to my attention. It's something I didn't think of and didn't know existed. I'll get a test kit and check it before I dig into this job. With that being said, the house is 59 years old. Most likely the floors were finished in some type of varnish or shellac. Worst case scenario it has lead in it. I will then buy a good respirator and sand the old finish off down to the bare wood. At that point I'd be lead-free and then apply a poly finish. I guess in all actuality I'll be doing that anyway regardless of the presence of lead. Again to reiterate, all of this will be done without the presence of my wife. I'll be sure that she avoids the place during the sanding and refinishing phases of this project.
FWIW, I've never seen a lead test come back positive on a clear finish. Lead was a pigment extender mostly used before WW2. It added hiding qualities to coatings. During WW2 and today titanium dioxide is used in stead. That said, I'm not a paint chemist, so if there is a question, test first. If it's positive, in addition to the respirator, wear disposable coveralls and goggles. Use a HEPA rated vac to collect the dust. Wear the safety gear until everything is thoroughly cleaned, including yourself. Whoever said "It's not bad for adults, but for babies and small children it can cause serious damage." needs to reread about lead poisoning. Lead can stay in human bones for years until it dissipates. There is no reason for anyone to needlessly expose themselves. Lead tests are cheap. If there's no lead, wear the respirator and goggles anyway. You still don't want to be breathing whatever crap settled into the cracks of the floor over 60 years.

Last edited by Maintenance 6; 11-24-2009 at 10:06 AM.
Maintenance 6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2009, 12:09 PM   #22
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 4,300
Rewards Points: 2,178
Default

refinishing maple hardwood


Just for the record, from my research lead in varnish was common prior to the introduction of urethane in the early 1960's. In fact, my old house had window varnish that tested out at about 30 percent lead by weight, which surprised me, as I too thought that clear finishes were unlikely to have lead in them. As for the use of lead in paints, that is well documented, however it seems that lead in varnish was also common, and certainly since it is easy to test for, and precautions can be taken, it would seem to be a no brainer to buy the test kit first, then formulate a plan later.
Daniel Holzman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2009, 06:51 PM   #23
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: WV
Posts: 294
Rewards Points: 258
Default

refinishing maple hardwood


I found out the closing on my house will be next wednesday the 9th. So I'm preparing to get to work. I do have a question though......

In the past, every time I've pulled up carpet it was laid on top of a plywood subfloor. We just used razor knives to cut down through the carpet and padding in 4-6 foot sections and rolled the old carpet out. However, with hardwood floors underneith this carpet what is the best way for me to take this carpet up? Do they make a special tool that can cut it without gouging the floors? Maybe like a hook knife or something?
speedster1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2009, 12:07 AM   #24
msv
Hardwood pro
 
msv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Lawrenceville, Ga
Posts: 102
Rewards Points: 75
Default

refinishing maple hardwood


hey speedster... the condition of your floor is what will determine the type of sander you need. if all you have to do is remove old finish, a buffer with sandpaper will do(will take a lot of time though). if you need to level the floor, unless you use a drum sander, you're wasting your time. buffer=175rpm, drum sander=1800+rpm. Start with finer grit until you get the hang of lowering/raising the drum, then you can start the actual sanding with 36grit. depending on how dark thestain you want to use is, i recommend applying a stain conditioner prior to the actual stain, or else you risk not having an even color, but spotty and blotchy. The screening of the floor after sanding is also crucial to color uniformity, as you need to get the entire floor to the same smooth "feel" for the stain to be absorbed evenly. I don't know what people have against Minwax, but i've been using their stains and finishes for 6 years (i do this for a living) and not once have they let me down. costwise, i think they're competitive. one thing you can do is, if you have a floor supply store close, go by and check out their products first.
good luck.
Mike, www.getyourfloors.com.

by the way, DO NOT CUT THE CARPET WHILE LAYING ON YOUR FLOOR!
lift it from a corner and then cut it. even a cutter will leave a very deep mark in the wood, one that you will only see when you apply the stain, when it will be too late.

Last edited by msv; 12-04-2009 at 12:10 AM. Reason: incomplete
msv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2009, 07:08 PM   #25
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: WV
Posts: 294
Rewards Points: 258
Default

refinishing maple hardwood


I finally took pictures of the hardwood floors. I'm almost positive they are maple. Some of the boards have a sort of flamed look to them. Unfortunately I left the camera at the new house and can't upload them tonight.

In general the floors look pretty good. There really isn't any finish on them to speak of so sanding them should be easier. There is one small area where there must have been a woodburner on tiles. There are small black spots of mastic or some other adhesive. Not much though.

There are also a few areas near register vents that I'll need to replace a few pieces of wood. What are my options for finding similar flooring. I really think this is similar to baskball court type fo flooring. It appears to be 2 to 2.5 inch flooring. I figured if I can't find any replacement boards I'd pull the boards out of a closest and use them since the vents will be more visable. Would I just cut the tongue off the face bail them down?
speedster1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2009, 05:37 PM   #26
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 20
Rewards Points: 10
Default

refinishing maple hardwood


Just wanted to say congrats on your closing, and good luck with your floors! I'm in the process of the same project (not to the sanding part yet)
de_sjiem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2009, 08:05 AM   #27
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: WV
Posts: 294
Rewards Points: 258
Default

refinishing maple hardwood


Thanks. You too.

Here is a few pics of the floors. Maybe you guys can tell if it's maple.

The second pic shows the location of the old wood burner and you can see the little black areas of adhesive.

I have to admit now I am feeling a little nervious about refinishing these floors. I'm afraid it might be over my head. And I'm not sure I can afford to pay someone to do it for me. Oh the trials and tribulations of home ownership
Attached Thumbnails
refinishing maple hardwood-floor1.jpg   refinishing maple hardwood-floor2.jpg  
speedster1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2009, 08:14 AM   #28
Remodeling Contractor
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Sandy Hook, CT
Posts: 3,590
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

refinishing maple hardwood


looks like one area is patched with a different wood species. This will really stand out when you stain it. Good luck.
Bob Mariani is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2009, 11:18 AM   #29
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,634
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

refinishing maple hardwood


Quote:
Originally Posted by speedster1 View Post
I have to admit now I am feeling a little nervious about refinishing these floors. I'm afraid it might be over my head. And I'm not sure I can afford to pay someone to do it for me. Oh the trials and tribulations of home ownership
People on this site who suggest anybody can run a drum sander, especially first time out of the rental yard, or properly refinish floors by attaching sanding discs to the bottom of a buffer? Are right to a point I suppose.

You can do this if you want but try one of the orbital sanders to start. Don't screw up your nice wood floors doing something stupid. A drum sander weighs 8,000 tons and when you turn it on to try it, you are already through the floor. You cannot edge it down for a test sample section. Unless someone knows of one I don't that is forgiving?

I still cannot tell from the photos by the way, but I am guessing from the grain mix you may not have a single wood species. I restored a little historic railway worker house here that had a mix of red oak, cherry, and maple. The historic worker houses here got leftovers from the mansions and grand Victorians being built at one point. It is beyond a beautiful wood floor once restored because of the mix.

I would never have attempted to redo it myself. And I am sorry, but renting the sander, buffer or whatever and buying it sandpaper at retail unless you can cut a discount? Cleaning everything up spotlessly so you can stain and seal the floors with box store crap at retail?

Some things are not DIY projects. The two competing guys who refinish floors for me here are insanely busy but almost cheaper than carpeting unless you like nylon and are willing to skip decent padding.

Any investment you put into restoring wood floors will come back at you ten fold along with anything you do to with regard to home hearth like the kitchen, bath and so forth. Bite the bullet.

Last edited by user1007; 12-15-2009 at 11:34 AM.
user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2009, 12:29 PM   #30
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Port Huron, MI
Posts: 84
Rewards Points: 75
Default

refinishing maple hardwood


Speedster,

I definitely can relate with your feelings of being scared to do the floors. I had convinced myself I could do it, but then the day before starting it I panicked and thought I might be nuts to try it by myself. I'm a grandma pushing retirement so physically I wasn't sure I'd be able to handle the (orbital) sander I had decided on. I ran through my options again. 1 - Do nothing and keep looking at my ugly floors as I did not have the money to spend on having them redone by a professional. Or 2 - Do it. I DID it!

There is no way I'd encourage a DIY'er to do your floors if you were going to be using a drum sander. Those are BRUTS and (I think) the ones you get at the rental places are not cared for well and therefore don't do a wonderful job - even if a pro was running it. AND, I think there is a real skill that is needed to operate it with professional results.

That being said I really want to encourage you to do it yourself (with an orbital sander). If I can do it, I think most anyone can do it with great results. Just take your time. Don't try any short cuts. After sanding be sure to vacuum really good, then tack off before doing the next poly coat. Put on sufficient coats using a high quality Poly product and applicator. Personally, although stinky, I was very pleased with the oil based poly. It gave me sufficient time to get the product down without any dry down problems and gave a wonderful end result.

I am SUPER pleased with my floors and feel they look as good as if they were done by a pro. I just had a party last week and had another person tell me they had just had their floors done by a pro and that mine looked better than theirs did.

So... If you're open to hearing from another true DIY'er with some recent experience with this,,, my suggestion is to DIY. Let us know what you decide and how it goes okay? The very best to you! Rox

Advertisement

roxksears is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
refinishing hardwood floors that have particle board over them skullface Flooring 3 06-02-2009 06:52 AM
Refinishing Hardwood floors ponch37300 Flooring 2 11-02-2008 05:08 PM
reclaimed maple hardwood cbeingessner Flooring 1 06-16-2008 09:08 AM
OLD Hardwood ( maple ) on a concrete slab MrLinux Flooring 1 01-31-2008 10:47 PM
Cost of Refinishing Hardwood Flooring ? Piney Flooring 2 03-27-2007 04:33 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts